Sunday, June 26, 2022

Sunday Selections

I haven't made a Sunday Selections post for a while but this Sunday I will join in this week along with Elephant's Child and River.

Coles is now a supermarket but once was also a variety store with fantastic plain food cafes in several locations as I remember. I like this retro display at Coles in Elsternwick. You can see the same at Manly in Sydney, as we noticed a week or so ago.


Be afraid of what the machine will tell you. They are in Priceline chemists chain stores. Do you want to know your blood pressure, weight, body mass index, body composition, heart age and diabetes risk.


No one batted an eyelid at the sight of two table tennis bats on the floor of the tram.


R is an organised cook.


The tightest curve for our suburban train system is just north west of Rushall Station on the Mernda train line. It makes for a good photo.


Just west of Caulfield Station.


Federation Square.


One of our usual cafes in the city uses souvenir teaspoons. This one, if you embiggen it, shows Fairytale Castle in Bri Bri, state of Queensland. Never heard of it.


Green and orange birds in the trees? 


Just before we visited Sydney, it was Ex Sis in Law's husband's 65th birthday, so down the big roads we went to Langy (Langwarrin). There was a pig on a spit which was delicious, and other roast meats along with vegetables and salads. But really, there were showers and it was so cold in spite of heating in the pool room, the spit warming another outdoors room and this fire in an old washing machine tub. We arrived about 4 and left just after 7 to get home to watch The Bill (Yes, it is a long time since we said that for the first time and even longer when I was a child and wanted to get home to watch Zig and Zag). Mother wisely decided she would not attend, but there were many other family and friends of Ex Sis in Law who we knew. I soon became bored and felt exhausted once home by the social interactions. 


Do tell me what this ship is supposed to carry.


It is always good when a cockatoo visits our balcony.


In the photos below, they are en masse in the trees. They might actually be corellas rather than cockatoos.


34 comments:

  1. Thank you for joining us again. I always love your eclectic collections. R certainly is an organised cook. Sometimes I am too.
    That was an excellent shot from the train round the corner. And, as you know, I am a big fan of cockies - and of corellas. Despite their noisy and destructive ways.

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    1. EC, on the rare occasions I cook, I am very organised too. I knew in advance about the curve on the train track but I had forgotten but I was in the right seat at the right time. Do you ever see cockies and corellas at the same time? I don't.

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    2. We see cockatoos and corellas together every day. They will even share the feeder (sometimes) though there is often a 'beak-off' to ensure that the top birds have it to themselves...

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  2. If you find out anything about that ship, let us know. My curiosity is tweaked also. A wide variety of interesting photos in your Sunday Selections this week!

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    1. Jenny, it is a bulk carrier ship with the tall bits being cranes I think.

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  3. Lovely selection Andrew. I am the opposite kind of cook but always admire the kitchens of the Rs. That ship looks purposeless, strange. And the BBQ sounds lovely.
    XO
    WWW

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    1. Thanks WWW. The barbeque was good, but social things like that exhaust me. Re ship, see comment above.

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  4. Does R clean as he goes? I kind of imagine he does.
    Pig on a spit and a pool room and another outdoor room? You make Langy sound posh!
    Could that vessel be a dredger? I think they have to keep the shipping channels deep for the big boats.

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    1. Yes Caro. I an a tidy cook too on the rare occasion I cook. There is nowt posh about their place but it is large and has lots of space and rooms, indoors and out.
      It is a bulk carrier, I would guess filled with grain. The tall things are for crane lifting or something like that.

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  5. I wonder how many of those souvenir spoons go missing. Maybe they even build that into the price!

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    1. Cro, the coffee is good and quite cheap. Does anyone now collect spoons? Maybe some get nicked.

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  6. I don't think that ship carries much of anything. It's so flat. How would it do in heavy seas.

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    1. Below deck bulk grain carrier I seem to have discovered now Strayer.

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  7. That's an excellent use of an old washing machine tub :)
    I'm glad you went and enjoyed the birthday roast in spite of the cold. My mum used to collect souvenir spoons and had about 100 which came to me eventually but I didn't really want them so after she died I gave them to a local antique store.
    I think that ship probably carries stacks of containers and has just been emptied of its load.
    I remember the original Coles Variety stores, and Woolworths had them too.

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    1. River, the tourist spoons were such a thing once. No re the ships, bulk below deck carriers, probably grain. Not sure if you ever went to our city Coles; the food used to come up in a dumb waiter and the crockery went back to the kitchen by the same means.

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  8. The retro display at Coles in Elsternwick is a terrific idea. Although teenagers may not even look at the photos, they give some evidence of the stories we oldies tell. We were talking today about how meat used to be minced on peoples' kitchen tables because shops didn't do it themselves.

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    1. Hels, ah yes. The mincer screwed to the table top. I am not sure what is in mince you buy now, but hand minced was pure meat.

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    2. I remember my mum doing that and always putting a slice of bread through the mincer after to collect tiny bits of meat that got stuck, for easier washing up later.

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  9. I think some Bond villain is hiding out on that ship.

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    1. Kirk, fleeing Australia? What terrible crime did he commit?

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  10. Lovely selection. like the cocky. the fire does looks inviting but as you said it was cold.

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    1. Margaret, yes the front of you body cooking and the back freezing.

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  11. I reckon you are right and they are corellas.

    We live near a park which is a regional roosting centre for cockatoos and corellas.

    In the last hour or so before sunset there's a kind of mounting rush hour as they converge on vantage points within about a half-kilometre radius of their destination, gradually getting closer to strategic points from which they make their final swoop.

    Since we first moved here the proportion of corellas has gradually increased. The roosting area has also slightly expanded. At the final moment individual cockatoos have a bit of an advantage by reason of size over corellas and the corellas seem to be forced out to the periphery.

    It can be a pretty exciting final 15 minutes or so if you are standing beneath the chosen trees.

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    1. MC, am I not always right? Ok, no. Your avian observations are very interesting. I never see cockatoos and corellas mix here. It is always one or the other for the day.

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    2. Andrew, they don't really mix. They just like the same spot to roost at night. They generally arrive separately, though these days, I reckon because the roosting spot has become a bit of a regional centre for both species, they end up at the same spots through the day. Corellas are later arrivals to Sydney than cockatoos.

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    3. PS: https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=362012112351725 - you can hear corellas more than cockatoos on that particular clip.

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    4. We saw and hears masses of corellas in Echuca last year. En masse they are terribly noisy but cockatoos individually make a louder screech. I like the softer tone of the red tailed black cockatoos we occasionally see here.

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  12. Anonymous6:20 pm

    What is the name / location of the cafe that uses souvenir teaspoons? It would be a fun place to visit to see what spoon you might get.

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    1. It sounds posher than what it is, Aix Café Creperie in Centre Place, Melbourne. The spoons do entertain us.

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  13. I loved your pictures today. The idea of life beyond the headlines in America right now is comforting.

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    1. The world goes on Debby, and most people do very good things.

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  14. Great images! I envy your avian diversity. We see hummingbirds during Ohio summers in the USA but only the single ruby-throated of this myriad species. ~sigh~ But as you kindly noted, I seem able to grow lush and juicy melons. Heh...

    I have to ask the meaning of 'plain food cafes'. Are they a sort of quick-serve restaurant? I'm imagining our Waffle House chain where short order cooks prepare things like steak, eggs, biscuits and gravy, hash browns, and of course waffles on large griddles in full view.

    Be safe and stay well!

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    1. Darla, I love your red cardinals and I was so excited to see humming birds in Canada. How to explain. Somewhere between a diner and a restaurant. You won't get steak, gravy or hash browns. Lots of prepared bread based food; sandwiches and rolls, paninis, bagels and heated pastry food like meat pies, nachos, bruschetta.

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  15. Wow! That's a lot of cockatoos! Glad you solved the ship mystery in your subsequent post. Is that a smiling fish outside the Caulfield Station fish bar? Clever to use the souvenir spoons. Makes things interesting.

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