Thursday, June 30, 2022

Finding your way

I love maps and I spend quite a bit of time perusing them. Old  maps can be so interesting, showing you something you had no idea about. Some I save for reference in the future, others I look at in detail when I find them. Here a few I've saved from the net over the last month. 

A ready reference map of the states of India. 


Partly tourist and partly regular passenger travel, Queensland does it country railway lines really well. See the disconnected red line near the top? I am sure Diane at Adventure before Dementia has taken The Gulflander.

No matter how many times I am told about the make up of the British Isles, I forget. This map is simple to understand and tells you what you need to know at a glance.


Now a shadow of its former self, our island State of Tasmania had an extensive train system. Aside from tourist trains, there aren't any passenger trains at all now. Maybe one day we might see a high speed train between the major city of Launceston and the state capital Hobart.

42 comments:

  1. Have you come across the work of Edward Tufte, such as his book Envisioning Information? Some of it is concerned with maps, and all of it is elegant.

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    1. I have not Tasker. I will take a look. I assume you find maps interesting. You've used a few over time.

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  2. I also like maps. Particularly very old ones. I am amazed at both how accurate (given the tools available) and inaccurate they are. And the old 'Here be dragons' could be accurately printed on some of today's maps.

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    1. EC, yes, I am often amazed too. EG, the accuracy of the survey of eastern border between Victoria and New South Wales. Lol, yes I agree about modern maps.

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  3. I am also a mapaholic and own many maps. Mostly I love Britain's Ordnance Survey maps which are downright brilliant.

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    1. Anonymous3:47 pm

      When I migrated to Australia, I couldn't believe there were no OS maps! Another complaint about maps is that some don't have a publication date on them.
      Margaret B.

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    2. YP, yes long have I heard about your OS maps.

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    3. Margaret, we do have high quality maps here but I can't remember who, or which government department, produced them. Lands Department? So true about dates. A map without a date can be useless for historical research. See my last map. No date and I have no idea and could only take a guess.

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    4. Margaret is very right. Maps do need dates - just like the lonely people. Where do they all come from?

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    5. Is this a cultural test Eleanor?

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  4. I wondered about seeing all of Ireland included in British Isles…this wiki article mentions it also. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Isles
    Controversial!
    Only one train from Cairns to Brisbane now, the Spirit of Queensland. We sometimes drive down to the Bowen station ( more like a halt than station) to see it come through making its way south about 5.30pm (4 times a week)

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    1. Cathy, that grabbed me at the time too but I also thought it was very convenient.
      So the Spirit is more of a tourist train now. I wasn't aware of that.

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    2. The Spirit of Australia is the regular passenger train from Brisbane to Cairns & back. Not just tourists lots of locals us it…..last time up there we saw grandmas/grandads being waved off by family “going back to Brissy is easier this way than driving” one family told me “they’re picked up at the other end by another son. Less wear and tear on their car plus less stress for them instead of being out amongst all the truckies”
      Young tourists/backpackers tend to use the long distance (Greyhound) bus

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    3. Thanks for the clarification Cathy. The bus would be cheaper.

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  5. That is interesting. Old maps provide great historical value.

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    1. Darla, I enjoy pouring over local maps and noting changes.

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  6. Interesting to see maps. Wouldn't that we good a train from Launceston to Hobart that went fast.

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    1. It sure would be Margaret but the coach service is not bad and I can't see the line being built in our lifetime.

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  7. When driving down through France recently, I nominated Lady Magnon as Chief Map-reader. On several occasions I noticed that she was holding the map either sideways or upside-down. I didn't like to ask!

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    1. Holding the map in the direction of travel. Makes sense to me.

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    2. Cro, I expect more like you weren't game to ask but probably knew why.

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    3. River, I used to pooh pooh people who turned maps upside now but I find myself doing it at times now.

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  8. I am old enough to remember when most of Africa was pink. I love an old fashioned globe as well. Comparing old to modern maps is fascinating to see how things have changed.

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    1. Our world maps must have been very dated Caro. I can remember seeing the Sub Continent all in pink too, when they became independent ten years before I was born.

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  9. It was my goal once to travel on all long-distance tourist trains, and did quite well across Australia, Canada, India etc. But when I checked the Gulflander map a few years ago, it had apparently closed all services.

    Ha!..I had examined the wrong map. It was the Sunlander that closed down.

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    1. Hels, I didn't know you had taken Indian trains! To Simla? To Ooty?

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    2. Andrew it was 22 years ago, but if I remember properly, the trip started in New Delhi, Rishikesh, Jaipur, Udaipur Agra and Varanasi. Then back to the capital.

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    3. Wonderful Hels. A train trip to the old cool hill stations of Simla and Ooty will remain a never fulfilled dream for me.

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  10. Now I want to go to Queensland and ride all those trains! I need a map of England similar to the one of India so I know where all the different counties are, like where is Northumbria? Which part is Yorkshire and Wessex and so on. I read about places and like to look them up in my big 50 years old Atlas which has a lot of places that now don't exist, or have had name changes.

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    1. River, it doesn't help when historical names are mixed with modern names. Northumbria is where R came from and is now called Northumberland, containing the major city of Newcastle upon Tyne, not our Newcastle on Hunter in NSW. Google doesn't do a bad job of showing English counties if you search for that. As large as it is, Google even does well enough with the US well enough. But I agree, the map of the Indian states is clear and simple and at a good size. Please do not use your old atlas to look at former eastern European countries unless you want an historical viewpoint.

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  11. I love old maps too and can peruse for ours along with helpful photos of places long gone and inhabitants. Especially the over-developed towns I have lived in and remember for their former simplicity without highways and with rail.
    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, yes. The memories that old maps might trigger are important too.

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  12. I always loved maps as a kid and used to spend hours poring over our big Rand-McNally atlas. I'm still good at geography as a result, and I still picture any given country the color it was in that atlas. (China was yellow; Germany was pink; France was green, etc etc)

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    1. Steve, I remember the name Rand-McNally but I am not sure why. Maybe it was the atlas. Your atlas must have been different. The ones I remember used pink for Britain and its colonies.

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  13. That is something that I really loved about the UK...that you could hop a train and go virtually anywhere! I love to look at maps too, and daydream about the places and people that live there.

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    1. Debby, while not cheap, train travel in the UK is so easy and frequent.

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  14. Agree with you regarding the British Isles. I too keep forgetting what is included and what is excluded. That Indian map is not old as I see states likeTelangana is included.

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    1. Haddock, I did wonder if state borders or whatever change in India. It seems they do.

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  15. I love train travel in Europe. How I wish we had a decent train system.

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    1. Jackie, yours is not too bad compared to many places.

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  16. The Isle of Man looks lonely in that third map :) Thanks for that one; it helped me for sure.

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    1. It does look a little lonely, Jenny. Note, no mention of the Channel Isles.

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