Saturday, May 14, 2022

Vote Often 3

Another interesting seat near me is the Liberal Party (conservative) blue ribbon and normally safe Goldstein. The sitting member has a strong independent 'teal' candidate against him. With Labor red, Liberal blue, Greens...well green, teal seems to be a combination of conservative Liberal Party economics, with a strong focus on the environment, climate change and progressive social issues. 

That the teal independents are a threat to moderate conservative Liberal Party members tells the story of how the Liberal Party has not kept up with society's socially progressive attitudes and concern for the future of out planet. I hope the teals do well, with moderates in the Liberal Party removed and the party will go further into an unelectable position full of ultra conservatives religious nutters with no social care values, no care for the environment, anti worker, no care for the less fortunate in society, pro privatised medicine and big business profit over everything. 

I was initially concerned about the removal of moderates but now I can see some sense in what might happen.

One possible victim could be the Member for Goldstein, the openly gay Tim Wilson who is being challenged by former ABC journalist independent candidate Zoe Daniels. Daniels reporting at times from trouble spots around the world was a terrific and she was a passionate reporter and I think hers may have been the last paper book I bought and it was a good read. I recommend Storyteller


22 comments:

  1. So many teals appearing out of nowhere gives me hope. I suspect they will do well though they may give Scummo hope of forming a minority government.

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    1. EC, while I am not liking this election, it is certainly an interesting battle between more than the usual contenders.

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  2. We're just screwed in the upcoming provincial election. DoFo Doug Ford conservative is likely to win again. Makes no sense to me why anyone would vote for him, he's done nothing in the last 4 years except line the pockets of himself and friends. His voters are white rednecks who fly Trump and Confederate flags and attend freedumb rallies.
    We might have a chance if the Liberals and NDP join forces.

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    1. Jackie, as an outsider lacking local knowledge, I am astonished that you think that Ford might win. From what I have read, he has been an astonishingly bad Premier. I am sure his support base is not in Toronto.

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  3. And then there's the bright yellow mob. A lot of those signs around here.

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    1. Caro, I hope to write something about the yellows before voting day.

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  4. I saw an ad from Labor listing 10 reasons to vote them in and the Liberals (they like to focus on Morrison in particular) out. What struck me was that climate change was not one of them. They don't want to antagonise their coal-employed base.

    That's partly a matter of optics (though not so partly as I would wish), but if there is a minority Labor government then I can see that "teals" will have a role to play in stiffening Labor's spine in this direction.

    I can't see Morrison getting much hope from a coalition with teals because if they get the numbers it will be at the expense of credible partners within the Liberals for the things they are keen on. Morrison will be in the same position as Abbott was back in 2010. Dutton even more so.

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    1. MC, Labor can really be wedged on coal. It is probably its weakest spot and I get why they don't highlight climate change. I recently listened to a podcast about the closure of coal mining in Germany's Ruhr Valley. The world did not end. Germany did not end. The coal miner's lives in the Ruhr Valley did not end.

      Morrison, Abbott and Dutton are exactly what is wrong with the current Liberal Party, along with the former creep, Porter.

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  5. Always good to see new faces, let's hope they get in and stick to their guns of what they believe in.

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    1. Haha Margaret, that never happens in politics, no matter how good their intentions are.

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    2. No it doesn't unfortunately .

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  6. I haven't been reading any of the election pages in the papers, I've tried, but my mind goes fuzzy after trying to make sense of it all after several paragraphs.

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    1. River, I can only say this. If you believe in big business making our economy wealthy and a little will trickle down to the poorer people in society, vote Liberal.

      If you are passionate about the environment and climate change, vote Green.

      The party that supports workers, social security, decent pay, health care and care for the unfortunate in society, vote Labor. Yes, I am biased. While I vote for different parties at every election, I make sure my preference goes to Labor.

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  7. If I lived in the Goldstein constituency, I would always vote Labor (i.e. Labour). As in Great Britain, Labor/Labour is historically the only political party that ever willingly did anything of significance to improve the lives of ordinary working citizens.

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    1. Dun worry YP. Typing Labor and not Labour grates on me every time. The change was when you country ran out of favor here, favour. Your later statement is motherhood for me.

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  8. I had no idea what teal meant! How simple - a combination of conservative BLUE Liberal Party economics, with a strong GREEN focus on the environment, climate change and progressive social issues. Teal = half way between green and blue!

    But that presents another question. How can a person concerned about progressive social issues and climate change vote for conservative economics?
    Hels

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    1. With some knowledge Hels, that is my interpretation of teals. Your question is valid and I don't have an answer beyond our political system needs to remain oppositional.

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  9. I look forward to this whole election thing to be in the past, and the elected Government installed.... For me, this is when my "real" work can begin. I will be requesting a lengthy face to face meeting with whoever my local member ends up being. When I voted the other evening, I had a 15 minute chat with my current MP, and she has promised to meet with me over a meal.

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    1. Pippa, do you really think there is a chance your local member will lose office? I am doubtful.

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    2. Andrew, I really do not know. I have noticed a small rumble of talk in my electorate that encourages people to vote in a way that tries to make this into a marginal seat. It has for many years been a "rusted on" very safe Labor seat.

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  10. Anyway, it looks both the camps will have a tough fight on their hands this time round.

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    1. Pradeep, as it should be in a healthy democracy.

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