Thursday, January 20, 2022

What? Say again? Speak clearly, don't mumble

Mother readily admits she is going deaf. If you speak directly to her and she is paying attention, she will hear fine, but otherwise not. She also uses it to her advantage. If she has to see a medical person who has an accent, she asks for ABI Brother to sit in and 'translate' to her what the doctor is saying. She tells the accented person she is deaf, not that she can't understand what they are saying. She dislikes any kind of technology she has to interact with, so I guess hearing aids won't be for her.

Meanwhile closer to home, someone else is becoming deaf and at a much younger age. It is hard to believe after a week of hot weather but I think last weekend one day it was cool enough to wear a jacket when we went into town, and cool enough to have bowl of soup at the QV shopping centre. 

We both had our usuals, mine being potato, leek and bacon. The bacon was a bit light on in my soup and I remarked to R, not too many pigs were harmed in the making of my soup. He asked me to repeat myself, twice. I did, the second time adding you know. Oink oink. Apparently I wasn't pronouncing pigs properly, although I would have thought it is a hard word to mispronounce.

Increasingly I have noticed he can not hear me if I am 'off camera' so to speak. The volume of the tv is often at a higher level than I like. 

Just this evening a little before six when he was watching tv, I said from my desk chair 'visa cancelled'. He couldn't hear me from two metres away, and I loudly repeated myself. Then he muted the tv and did hear what I said, but then said, whose visa? Oh, c'mon I replied. Whose visa do you think?

33 comments:

  1. Welcome to my world! John did get hearing aids, with the latest Blu tooth technology and it certainly helps with the TV volume as he can listen through the aids, no volume!! He can also answer his phone with them!! Although if he is listening through his aids then he still can't hear me!

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    1. Jackie, maybe John deliberately can't hear you.

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  2. Himself is going deaf too - though I am never certain whether it is deafness by act of god or selective hearing at play. His father was very deaf and rejected hearing aids. My voice was obviously at the wrong pitch for him. Several times when I rang their home and he answered the phone he hung up saying 'no-one is there' no matter how loudly I shouted.

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    1. EC, it must be your fault that your FiL could not hear you. Your voice was wrong. Isn't that how it works?

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  3. Please type in a louder font as I couldn't make out what you were saying in this blogpost.

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    1. YP, IT WAS ABOUT DEAFNESS. ARE YOUR HEARING ME?

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  4. How I sympathize with R. I have just had both my ears syringed which has made a big difference but I have no directional hearing. No idea from which direction an emergency vehicle is approaching nor where people are when they shout my name.

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    1. Ah Marie. We can sneak up on you from any direction and give you a fright. Do many people shout out your name?

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  5. That's not fun, to lose one's hearing. When we would visit my grandpa, when young, the TV was on so loud you could hear it clearly outside. He was nearly deaf by then. Also, a big threat always from parents, probably still is---turn down the music, you'll go deaf before you're old.

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    1. Strayer, well do I remember 'turn it down. You will go deaf'. Maybe they were right.

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  6. Advanced middle age is a shocker :( And difficult to predict as the issue creeps up quietly. Arthritis is ugly but deafness damages social contacts.

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    1. Hels, I've always thought loss of sight would be worse than losing hearing, but maybe not. Reading is kind of a selfish thing.

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  7. Even with hearing aids, the HH's hearing is shot.

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    1. Sandra, why do people spend money on hearing aids and they still can't hear. A friend is a prime example, having spent about $2,000 on his hearing aids. Our government does supply them for free, but they are very basic.

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  8. Does he realise he is going deaf? Will he accept a suggestion of a hearing test? If eh needs hearing aids will he get them? There are some nice new ones on the market that fit right into the ear and can't be seen so no one will know.

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    1. River, yes, there are quite brilliant sets available now, and he can afford them. I don't think he knows he is going deaf and it is not bad enough yet for me to bring it up. It will be me not speaking properly.

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  9. I feel your pain. I think Himself and R are about the same age. Himself got hearing aids very reluctantly from costco (great price, great aids, great service) and had them match his glasses arms. Then he had his eyes fixed and no longer needs glasses so the hearing aids don't get worn cos he's so bloody vain. I HATE having to repeat myself. Or worse, be accused of mumbling!

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    1. Caro, sorry, I missed what you said. You need to write more clearly. What?

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  10. Good luck. I'm married to one of those as well. His sister used to be the same until her husband adopted the policy of always refusing to repeat himself. She now has hearing aids!

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    1. Barbara, that is so interesting. I think those hard of hearing do hear what is said but need extra time to for their brain to interpret.

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  11. Anonymous2:35 pm

    Really important that he gets hearing aids then, as there are studies that deafness can bring on Alzheimer's. Academic Hearing in Carlton are great, and free to get hearing checked.
    J

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    1. Thanks J. That isn't something I knew about.

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  12. I once took my late Mother-in-Law to see a hearing specialist at the local hospital. She claimed to be very deaf, but I was shocked to see that when the specialist literally whispered to her, she could hear every word.

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    1. Cro, couldn't a whisper in the ear be different to normal speech hearing, let alone being in a crowded area.

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  13. What I say, If you tell him to have his ears checked he will jump to the ceiling and pretend that he hears more then well ! No deaf people will ever admit that he needs a hearing aid ! A friend of mine only wears it when her son is coming ! We can shout as loud as we want to, she hears perfectly ! Riccardo too pretends he hears very well, now in his home everybody is half deaf and they all speak very loud, they can't wear a hearing aid becaause they would break it. The worst is if you don't start early it becomes worse and worse, try to track him to the doctor and prepare yourself for some spectacular scenes !

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    1. All quite true Gattina and you speak from experience.

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  14. Hearing loss is sneaky. It's always easy to tell when it's happening.

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  15. Maybe it is a vanity issue with some women I know who need both specs and hearing aids. I hate shouting at someone (and I articulate well, so they tell me.) But they dislike even tiny evidences of decrepitude. Maybe their diminishing sight tells them they are are still 25 in their mirrors? I dunno.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, I think for many it is vanity, especially about hearing aids, but they are so tiny and discreet now. I don't why it is an issue. Lol at glasses and looking 25.

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  16. As for vanity, I think it's more a broad scale issue with admitting human frailty. My own accumulating decrepitude is disheartening. But there are many stories I could share about my husband and father going deaf. ~rolls eyes~ Communicating can be a huge annoyance.
    Best wishes!

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    1. Darla, while it is not fun to experience it is interesting to observe your own deterioration as you age.

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