Sunday, January 23, 2022

Patross Knitting Mills

A couple of you were a little curious about the history of Patross Knitting Mills and I was too. 

Cro at Magnon's Meanderings was quite correct in that the name is a combination of two names. The daughter of one of the owners explains in this just over one minute video clip. Bear in mind the clip is twelve years old now, so don't expect to have some good nosh at the Near East restaurant. So we have Patnik and Rosenfield to make Patross. Both men went on to found the still published Australian Jewish News.


The building dates back to 1885 and was built as a (very large) drapery store named Harcourt and Parry Emporium. I like one snippet I found, "The tower was lit up by electric light which made the establishment the centre of public attention". I expect it was battery generation if it was 1885. The shop went on to become the knitting mill.

The building is now occupied by the world famous Australian Tapestry Workshop that has created hand woven tapestries for private clients, businesses, public buildings and galleries all over the world.

27 comments:

  1. Thanks for the history! It IS a great building, and it's cool that it's still occupied by a textile-related business.

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    1. Steve, yes it is great that it has respected textile organisation within.

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  2. Like Steve I love that textiles still call that gorgeous building home.
    World famous it might be, but I haven't heard of the Australian Tapestry Workshop and am heading off to follow your link now.

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    1. Wow, there are some stunning pieces there - and the process reminds me of the bobbin lace my mother created.

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    2. EC, I know a little about bobbin lace, and that it is very beautiful. Aren't mothers strange people! I mean like the picture you have painted of your mother and her needle skills.

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  3. I was quite impress with the tapestries.
    Coffee is on and stay safe

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  4. I just noticed the Whelan The Wrecker history this morning and felt very sad about some of the beautiful Melbourne buildings that were destroyed. Thank goodness Patross Knitting Mills is still in good condition - it is an attractive, historical style of architecture.

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    1. Hels, I saw that about Whelan in an electric newspaper too. Sad about the Colonial building but not about the destruction of one old one for the construction of Manchester Unity.

      Victorian Gothic apparently, like Westminster.

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  5. Interesting bit of history there.

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    1. More so than I thought River.

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  6. I love old textile and mills. Have visited many, this building is gorgeous and the tapestries incredible, what a wonderful repurpose.

    XO
    WWW

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  7. I miss the old haberdashery/drapery stores. They were a treasure trove of interesting bits and pieces.

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    1. Caro, they are not a strong memory for me, but I do remember them.

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  8. That's all very well but can't you just finish off the pub work series first? I can't stand the suspense. You are such a tease.

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    1. MC, I am sitting on the post. I've given it an R rating subject line. I need to remind myself that I among contemporises who have similar life experiences. Maybe Tuesday.

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  9. Ha ha. I was almost right, but not Pat Ross.

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    1. Cro, but was there really a Ken Wood?

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    2. Possibly a wooden Ken? One who (fibs) lies like a (wooden) railway sleeper?

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    3. Yes, he really was!

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  10. Nice look to the building.

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    1. Strayer, a bit shabby but it will receive a makeover.

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  11. Interesting that the style is very European, in a relatively warm south Pacific location

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    1. Hmm TP. Mention this relative warmth aspect to me in July.

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  12. Beautiful building. Glad it lives on within the creative world.

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    1. Free tours I see too Marie. I should take an interior look.

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