Monday, January 17, 2022

Mirka Mora

Before Mirka died she expressed regret at being more famous for being Mirka Mora than her copious artistic output. I understand that but would she have been so well known for her art if she wasn't the larger than life Mirka? I doubt it.

The Jewish Museum in St Kilda has a Mirka exhibition running until the end of this month. We booked a time slot, paid and took a look.

I know rather a lot about Mirka and have mentioned her in a few posts over the years. It is so interesting to look back at comments in 2007. https://highriser.blogspot.com/2007/12/iconic-women.html

My writing was not the best at holding a reader, but still I take some pride in this post and the research I put into it. https://highriser.blogspot.com/2012/05/puzzlement.html

Funnily just today (Thursday) we lunched with a friend and his partner who we had not seen for a couple of years (it's complicated). The partner works in aged care and nursed Mirka in her final year. He came home one night and said to his partner, an old lady died today, Mirka. The partner is Indonesian born and had no idea who Mirka was. Mirka who? our friend asked. Mora was the reply, and it dawned on our friend who his partner had been nursing.

Mirka was outrageous at times, and we loved her for it. She was maybe not quite as extreme as Miriam Margolyes but similar. 'I got under the table and.....'.

Here are some photos from the exhibition.












A young Mirka.





Sewing box on the right?



Coming out of a loo.




One of Mirka's sons piggy backing her across water.


She decorated pottery too.


Mali the elephant was a big deal at Melbourne Zoo but I can't remember why. Melbourne Zoo has a very worthwhile campaign against deforestation for the production of palm oil. Mirka decorated this sculpture.


Recorded by the photo name as the French Embassy in St Kilda, but it wasn't. 


It's partly covered over at one end but this Mirka work is at our main city Flinders Street train station.


18 comments:

  1. Hooray for outspoken, creative people. We need them. Whatever their gender.

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    1. We do indeed need them EC, to challenge our comfort levels.

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  2. The first word caught my eye is Bohemian. Mirka is sure pretty. I love to see her work in person.
    Coffee is on and stay safe

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  3. I am so glad she is remembered for her art and her larger than life persona. She was an amazing woman.

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    1. Caro, she was indeed quite amazing. We don't see the likes of her now.

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  4. My three favourite things in life are: the arts, European culture and proper espresso. You covered Mirka's art nicely, but I think she and her spouse had even more impact on Melbourne's food and coffee habits! It was said that Mirka Cafe in Exhibition Street had Melbourne’s first espresso machine (which I don't believe). But I remember very well Tolarno opening in StKilda in the mid 60s. Blissful memories.

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    1. Hels, Tolarno must have been amazing. While Mirka may have been upstairs creating art, she circulated among diners too.

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  5. I can see the influence of Chagall in her work. She was obviously a fascinating woman.

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    1. I had to Google Chagall, Cro, and I see what you mean.

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  6. I have never heard of her, but then I don't travel in artistic/theatric circles. I like the painting which is picture #9.

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    1. River, I don't think Mirka is well known out of Melbourne. Yes, #9 is good. It really struck me.

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  7. To be remembered, is to be immortal

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  8. She seems like quite a personality! I don't think I've heard of her, but her art is interesting. And yeah, how strange it must have been for your friend to realize his own partner was her nurse!

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    1. Steve, I don't think art critics would think too highly of her, but the public do.

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  9. A very big life, she had. I like the jumbled dwelling painting and the one above--the jumbled mess of life people, too. I like both a lot.

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    1. Strayer, I especially like the jumbled dwelling work too.

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