Thursday, December 09, 2021

You don't have mail

No mail anymore from this building. R worked in this building when it was a mail exchange sorting centre. It is now a pretty good hospitality business. I was at Spencer Street Station and I noticed these crowns adorning the building. Are they Doric columns?  

This one looks like a king's crown. Note the GR in the railings, George Regina Rex I suppose but the building is older than the reign of King George. 


And this one is like a queen's crown. 

25 comments:

  1. Ionic columns, I believe? It's certainly a very formidable looking building!

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    1. Steve got there before me. They are Ionic columns. There are three principal styles in Greek architecture - Doric columns, Ionic columns and Corinthian columns. Ionic columns can be identified via the curled scrolling effect at the top.

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    2. Indeed Steve. Ionic was in my mind. I am not sure why I suggested Doric.

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    3. YP, yes I learnt about the three columns at school but it was long time ago. I did know they weren't the more ornate Corinthian.

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    4. It's funny that we all devoted precious school time to learning the three types of classical Greek columns! I wonder why it was considered such an important thing for us to know?

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    5. Learning about Greek columns kept our minds off recreational drugs.

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  2. I love your eye for detail. And yes, definitely regal additions to the building.

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  3. Anonymous10:06 am

    George Rex not george regina (which is the feminine gender)!

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    1. Anon, I have amended, thank you. I was doubtful and I thought I checked but it seems I didn't.

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  4. King George V was early last century (1910?) so it could have been him. I did a walking tour through Melbourne a few years ago and learned so much about our hidden architectural treasures.

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    1. Caro, I am hopeless with English royals. I've done a few tours in the city including gay walking tours, but never just a general one.

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  5. Anonymous11:16 am

    “Statement of Significance
    Mail Exchange Building - 670 - 696 Bourke Street,, MELBOURNE VIC 3000
    Source: http://vhd.heritage.vic.gov.au/search/nattrust_result_detail/64383
    Built during 1913-17 to the design of the office of the Commonwealth Home Affairs under Chief Architect, Horace J Mackennal, the seven storey steel-framed Mail Exchange Building is architecturally significant at the state level as an impressive example of the conservative classical design by the youthful Commonwealth government and in being distinguished by its Greek flavour, ten years ahead of Melbourne's mainstream Modern Greek Revival. Its architectural significance is enhanced by its corner siting and relationship with the generally Edwardian streetscape to the east and by its external integrity. The metal framed windows are early for a major building.
    The Mail Exchange Building is historically significant as a major public building constructed as an extension to the Melbourne General Post Office and situated on a prominent city site that is strategically located opposite its major distribution point, Spencer Street Station (Southern Cross Station), at the western end of Melbourne. The building is technologically significant in reflecting the changing requirements of the postal service and the modernisation of the mail system.
    Classified: 26/07/1990 Revised: 17/04/1991”

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    1. Thank you Anon. Along with steel framed windows, a steel framed building back then really surprises me. I think there was a tunnel connecting the building to Spencer Street Station.

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  6. I used to know which column was which, but I've forgotten and don't care anymore. I never would have spotted those crowns! Good eye, Andrew.

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    1. River, like with any things, I don't care anymore either. I asked R if he knew of them when he worked there and he said yes.

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  7. I knew the Mail Exchange Hotel building was classy. What I did not know what that it had originally been Hoddle's own Georgian home where he lived for nearly 50 years. Thanks for the prompt.

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    1. Hels, where his home was, and that was a surprise to me too.

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  8. Yes, Ionic; as people have said. Doric was less decorative and more 'dumpy'.

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    1. Cro, neurons are firing and I am remembering about columns now.

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    2. Well now I have to google the columns and see which is which.

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  9. My goodness you did well to see those crowns. Seems the building has a lot of history and a few tales to tell.

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    1. Margaret, indeed it has an interesting history. I may go there one day for a daytime g&t.

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  10. Seems strange the columns begin second floor. Seems like a lot of weight to bear from the first.

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    1. I would guess they are just decorative Strayer. However they do look like they are holding up a lintel, so dunno.

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