Wednesday, August 04, 2021

Maturity

Just a short post this morning and another short one later today. It may double my daily comments and double my blog comment income, but I haven't received a cheque for that as yet.

Like many childless older people, I am an expert in child rearing. I could write a book with my theory of raising happy and well adjusted mature children who can fend for themselves as I did from about 16. You must have noted how mature I am. "Order! Order! Will The Court remain silent", I say as I bang my gavel.

Children learning maturity, emotional and otherwise, independence and respect for others, animals and environment are partly not things that can be taught. It quite depends on how they are shaped by you and society.

A caller to ABC Melbourne radio station yesterday was talking about the advantages and disadvantages of having her sons in their early twenties vaccinated or not with the AZ vaccine or wait for the Pfizer vaccine to become available to them.  

Did you get that? She is choosing the vaccine for her sons who are in their early twenties! Extraordinary. There was no mention of a disability and that she was their carer.

My jaw fell to the floor.  

Now I have forgotten what my second post for the day was going to be. You may get off lightly if I can't remember.

25 comments:

  1. My reading list has just returned. I have appointments for the day, but am delighted to see another post from you.
    In my early twenties I was virtually independent and would have resented any effort from my parents telling me which vaccination I should take. And I am grateful for that independence which has served me well.

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    1. EC - Yay for the return of your reading list!!

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    2. Ditto :) on the reading list
      I was independent when I began working at 16.

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    3. Good news EC. I would be very surprised if you weren't independent at that age. Maybe my upbringing did not restrict me enough but I was very strong willed.

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    4. River, nor am I surprised at you being independent at a young age.

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  2. Doesn't surprise me judging by the parents of young adults that I know today. These 18-22 yo kids couldn't make a decision on their own.
    I left home at 20 and made all my own decisions by then.

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    1. Jackie, wasn't it just so different. As R says, children were part of the family, not the focus.

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  3. I'm hoping the lady in question just gave the wrong impression of the situation. Here even 12 year olds are specifically encouraged to make the vaccine decision independently. If they say "no", it's no. Likewise with "yes".

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    1. That's interesting Jenny. I think that is too young and parents should hopefully decide to have them vaccinated until at least the age of 15 or 16.

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  4. My question is why is mom making a decision for a 20 year old +.
    My oldest son and his family went and got their vaccination. But Not sure if my youngest one had his vaccination. And what every there choice is...nothing I can do. It bothers me when parents get into there adult children life. And the other way around.
    Coffee is on and stay safe

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    1. Dora, I think with so many staying at home for longer, into their twenties, maybe the mother thinks she still has parental rights over them. A good point about the other way around.

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  5. Didn't hear the conversation which so astounded you, but I wonder if you are being a bit harsh on the caller.

    A friend of mine with three offspring aged about 25-32 told me the other day that she had intervened to send her youngest, aged mid-twenties, to her own doctor after the doctor he first saw declined to give him the Astra-Zeneca jab and said he should wait for the Pfizer. The second Dr prescribed the A-Z.
    I'm sure the son is taking the decision, but of course she still cares about his welfare. She also told me that she was relieved that her middle child, a teacher, was about to be receive a jab arranged by his employer. She doubted that he would have got around to doing anything about it and I'm sure that she would have been encouraging him to get a move on if that had not occurred. Her oldest child (obviously no longer a child) lives in Europe and was also most keen for the other two to be vaccinated asap. Isn't that just family members caring for each other?

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    1. MC, I did take her literally and maybe that wasn't what she meant. Encouraged or suggested or nagged may have been better, which is possibly how it was with your friend. I hope the the recent tragic COVID deaths in your state will get some motivation into younger 'bullet proof' young adults. R's sister in England nagged him to get vaccinated as soon as possible, but it did take time with his own doctor. We are both vaccinated now.

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  6. I was reading yesterday about a woman who is still breastfeeding her 4 year old son. Maybe this woman is doing the same for her sons in their 20's.

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    1. Cro, and I not so long ago read of boys up to the age of ten being breastfed. It seems rather strange to me but then expressed milk is sold here to body builders and others for quite a price. Human milk has some quality to it for adults apparently.

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  7. Extraordinary indeed, yet there are so many like her. I have heard of one woman who cannot even take a peaceful soak in the bathtub without her daughters banging on the door for her to do things for them. Daughters are in their late teens. I fear we are raising a nation of kids who won't be able to cope on their own because mummy hasn't told them what and how and when etc. My own kids made choices and decisions for themselves about a year before they left school.

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    1. River, we think as one on all this. It is of real concern that children are not being brought up to be independent and resilient. Yet, I aside from Jo who has been somewhat cosseted, I haven't seen it in my family.

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  8. In there 20's, good heavens certainly her children are not independent as yet. When I left home to go nursing that when I became independent and was able to think for myself.

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    1. Margaret, you would have been quite young when you began nursing I guess. Swapped Mother authority for Matron authority.

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  9. You would be surprised at the number for 20 and 30 year olds that go to the Doctors at the clinic where I work and then phone their Mothers to supply the credit card details to pay for the visit! I started working in a Bank when I was 18 and even had my own credit card and paid for my clothing, travel, etc. Kids are too spoiled nowadays and have no resilience!

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    1. No Sami, I am not surprised at all. There seems to be a theme of bloggers being early independent types. I wonder???

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  10. All us childless folk should do that, band together, each write two paragraphs when presented a child rearing problem. i bet it would be hilarious.

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    1. Strayer, safe with the knowledge we will never have to test our own opinions.

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  11. Okay, I have children. Granted, the youngest is in her 30s, the oldest about to turn 40. I am trying to imagine myself telling them what to do.

    I can't.

    BTW, all mine are vaccinated, and did so of their own volition.

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  12. Oh this made me laugh so much Andrew. Both my kids aren't kids anymore, Dave has his own family now, unfortunately living in Sydney 😱 Aimee owns her own house, only five minutes away which is lovely.. I am not adverse to the occasional nag, it's my right, right 😀 Both have had vaccine of own accord, no nagging necessary there 😉

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