Thursday, May 06, 2021

Kill the poof

I am making assumptions but it seems this man was killed because he was gay. Tongans were screwed up by missionaries. If that sounds like a superior white male statement, so be it. Tonga embraces effeminate men who are female like, but not men who like men. 

https://www.starobserver.com.au/news/shock-and-grief-over-tongan-lgbt-activist-polikalepo-kefus-murder/202789


This one is just too awful, such a horrible way to die.

https://www.starobserver.com.au/news/gay-latvian-dies-after-vicious-homophobic-attack/202751


Both overseas but not our business to bother with their judicial systems although to note, people are in custody for both crimes. This one is, a copy and paste from Star Observer. FYI, Grindr is a gay hook up app. The penalty from the South Australian District Court Judge Liesl Chapman follows. It doesn't really matter that the victim was gay. It is an extreme crime against a person and credit to the SA Police and public prosecutors for getting it before the court with damming evidence. That is not always the case by police forces. 

This is not something I do lightly. Blogger may disappear one day and we will all be forced to Wordpress (sorry Wordpress users. Beta videos were superior to VHS but hey, Beta disappeared), but my blog is also archived by the State Library. It is on the record for his future grandchildren to find if they Google him. This is not summary justice. Caire has been convicted by a court and his penalty for torturing someone is an absolute disgrace.  

 saw the victim lured through a fake Grindr account set up by Caire. The elderly man was taken to a Murray Bridge house and then tortured by what was described as a ‘horrifying array of weaponry’ including having a gas lighter held to his head, being probed with a taser, electric drill, his arm sliced with a knife and his fingers placed between secateurs.

The victim was also injected with a needle that he was made to believe contained AIDS, and was told “there’d be consequences” if he did not hand over $5,000 in cash.


Charlie Michael Edward Caire is a right charmer and not even particularly attractive. The sentence? Caire will be released from the Mount Gambier Prison on Wednesday to travel to the District Court in Adelaide to sign a three-year good behaviour bond. 

26 comments:

  1. A three year good behaviour bond!!!!
    I am filled with inarticulate rage and words fail me.

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    1. Agreed totally Elephant's child. But Andrew, Claire's attractiveness wouldn't have affected his moral responsibility anyhow.

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    2. EC, in spite of what MC says below, I think he received a very light punishment.

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    3. Hels, indeed not. As people do, I was looking for a weak point.

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  2. He has spent 14 months inside already and has a suspended sentence with some years to run which afaik should spring back if he offends.

    The sentence does feel unprotective of gay men who are quite frequently (as in this case) the subject of self-appointed vigilante crime as in this case because of the popular conflation of homosexuality and paedophilia.

    Vigilante crimes are also crimes against the administration of justice and should be punished even more severely for that reason.

    All the same, imprisonment achieves so little and costs so much. I'd rather all sentences were shorter.

    The bit about calling him a remarkable young man was doubtless intended to motivate him to rehabilitate himself. There is some chance of this.

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    1. I confess MC, it was very selective writing by me, just as some media organisations do.

      In whatever form, I detest violence by one person against another and I often think punishments are inadequate and not a deterrent, although I don't know that such people like him think things through.

      His legal people pulled out the pedo card, but as far as I can see, unsubstantiated.

      Imprisonment does achieve something. It gives victims some feeling of the world is just. That man is being punished severely for what he did to me and I hope it deters him from ever doing the same to another.

      As I am sure you know, people like him laugh behind the backs of judges' statements as you quoted.

      I know I sound like an old time right wing reactionist, and I am not really. But I have little tolerance for violence by one person against another. I can't save the world, but I can at least give publicity to to the crime committed by scum like Caire.

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  3. He did a very bad thing under the influence of drugs, so let's hope he gets "clean" and then see what kind of person he is. If he is still inclined towards gay bashing then I hope someone monitors his movements. I don't approve of killing just because someone is gay. Don't approve of killing for any other reason either.

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    1. River, my mind is going back to something you told me a long time ago about people and drugs. The can be very troubled people, but as above, I really have no tolerance of violence.

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  4. Ugh! This makes me feel physically ill. No words, Andrew, just tears.

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    1. Maribeth, the world can be a hard place for some.

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  5. Despite all the progress the LGBTQ community has made, it seems like it's never enough.

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    1. It is not yet Kirk, even in so called sophisticated western countries.

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  6. That Caire business is a disgrace, He should never be released; he's obviously a danger to society. Do they honestly believe that if he signs some bit of paper, that he'll behave himself for three years? And what about after those three years are up? Crazy.

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    1. Cro, a judge having wool pulled over their eyes by a criminal seems all too common.

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    1. Margaret, a bit of a downer and yes, all three are shocking.

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  8. I've been having a discussion with some colleagues recently, skeptical about why LGBTQIA+ issues are still important. There seems to be a prevailing view that with marriage equality, everything is now "sorted". On the way home tonight, I picked up a Star Observer, with many stories of violence both here and overseas. I think I'll take a copy of the paper into work and say, "hey, read this".

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    1. James, if you do the SO into work, thanks. People do need to know what things are like for some people. I keep in mind that you work in a very enlightened workplace.

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  9. Violence of any kind is dreadful. Targeting innocent victims because of their orientation is abhorrent. And the punishment does not fit the crime.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, at times it feels like there has been no progress in the world, although that isn't true.

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  10. These are terrible and horrific.

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  11. I think anyone who could do those unbelievably horrific things to another human being whether under the influence of drugs or not has serious issues that need looking into before being let out into society, if ever!

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    1. I agree Grace. I have no tolerance of violence by one person against another and such should lead to long imprisonment.

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