Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Town Hall Tuesday

 I was a little surprised by this one, as much for the fact that I did not know it at all. The reason is it is not a on a road to anywhere. It is in quietish streets, ten minutes walk from Middle Brighton Station. 

When my mother's forebears arrived in Melbourne in the 19th century, they bought land for market gardens in Brighton. Over time they sold their market gardens and slowly began at outward creep ending up with market gardens in Oakleigh and even Clayton. While vegetable growing was lucrative, it was very hard work with very early starts to get produce to market. Brighton would now be one of the wealthiest suburbs in Australia, reeking of old money (maybe not so much nowadays). I rather wish my family had kept some land there. 

Brighton Town Hall was built in 1885 but there is little else of his history without having to burrow down. 

Pretty stock standard Victorian architecture and I am pleased to say the clock was correct. I don't like the blanked out windows in the clock tower and it is not grabbing me too much.


The side view with an inappropriate annex entrance to a library I think.


I'm getting a glimpse of something interesting.


A lovely rose garden in front of the main entrance to the town hall. This must be the front.


Yes, a nice portico, but sadly with more blanked out windows. I wonder why? A working fountain. Nothing sadder than a non working fountain.


Oh, a non working fountain, in what seems like an amphitheatre.


I suggest this is the nicest setting of any of the town halls I have photographed yet.



There is even a rose arbour. 

At times public transport works so well for me. This day not so much. I had a decent wait for a 58 tram to South Yarra Station, just missed the train to Middle Brighton with a 15 minute wait for the next, and then just missed a train back with another 15 minute wait. I thought I might had made the train back, knowing its arrival time at the station but as I came to the beginning of the platform that I couldn't access until further along, I realised it was hopeless without me sprinting, and I don't sprint no more. Then I heard the bank of the wheelchair platform being dropped by the driver for someone to board. Had I walked briskly, I could have made it as the train was delayed for a minute, but I didn't. C'est la vie. There was nothing to rush for.

21 comments:

  1. It is a lovely setting, but the town hall itself doesn't grab me. I wonder why those windows are blanked out?

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    1. EC, a good question about the windows. Blinds give privacy and cut out sun.

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  2. Brighton was always a classy suburb, so the council must have been keen to a preserve a lot of land empty to build the huge gardens, paths and fountain. Most suburban town halls now are squished up against the neighbouring buildings.

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    1. Indeed Hels. So many town halls have little land around them. Brighton and St Kilda are quite special in this way.

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  3. A lovely way to be"Nothing to rush for now". It's a nice town hall and lovely rose garden. Shame about the windows.

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    1. Diane, certainly on my own, there is no need to rush. There is always something to look around at and perhaps photograph.

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  4. The building is a bit plain but still far nicer than 70's plain brick square buildings. I wonder if the blacked out windows were merely shaded from the sun? The gardens are beautiful.

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    1. River, the windows could be blanked out for that reason, but blinds would have done. The blanked windows spoil the building. The gardens were such a surprise to me.

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  5. The back is certainly more inviting that the front. If the front had been set back from the road it would have been better.

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    1. Cro, you are so right. It is a strange orientation.

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  6. It sounds so strange to me that people immigrated two centuries ago to another continent, gave the same names as the country they are coming from (I was in Brighton, lol)and built exactly the same way as they did back "home" ! My Great great great Grandfather's brother went to America with his family !

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    1. Gattina, the names reflect where arrivals here came from, Great Britain. We do and always have had Aboriginal names too, and some of the more recent are Wurundjeri Way and Birrarung Marr. It took me a while to learn them.

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  7. Elegant building. My father use to say, "never run after a streetcar or a woman, there will be another one along in a minute." My mother didn't like it when he said that.

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    1. Funny about your father. I used to say, never run for a train, tram or bus. Now, it is a very moot point.

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  8. Those are beautiful grounds! What is the round brick building overlooking the rose garden? That looks pretty cool.

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    1. Steve, it is the local library.

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  9. A tower a tad too tall.

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    1. Cynthia, certainly in the first photo it looks to be rather tall.

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  10. I love gardens and porticoes, and 'I don't sprint no more' either;)

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    1. Sandra, the gardens are particularly nice.

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  11. The tall clock tower is a bit unusual Andrew, makes it real easy to spot from afar I should think. It's so frustrating not being able to move faster, I've tried now and again, definitely not worth it. Four weeks isn't that long right 😀

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