Wednesday, November 04, 2020

Retirement

 Retirement Imagined

7.00 Wake, dress, 40 minute walk, listen to podcasts

7.50 Shower, breakfast, take medications

8.10 Sit at desktop

8.30 R arises, makes instant coffee, chat about the day ahead

8.50 R showers

9.10 The day ahead begins

Retirement What Really Happened

7.00 Wake, make instant coffee, go back to bed and play on tablet, while listening to radio

8.15 Get up, make more instant coffee, only ever drink half the second cup, sit at desktop while listening to radio

8.30 Take medications

8.30 - 9.30 Occasionally expose myself in my dressing gown to all and sundry on street from the balcony while checking that trams and traffic are flowing normally. Otherwise, still at desktop

9.30 - 9.45 R arises, makes instant coffee, discuss the day ahead

10.10 R showers

10.40 I shower

11.00 The day ahead begins

God forbid we have to be anywhere before 11.00am

Ok, there is a bit of theatre in the latter and during lockdown we really felt the need to spread the minimal things we could do each day out over the day. It has seemed to have become a habit though. Better do something about that.

39 comments:

  1. Anonymous5:15 am

    Gathering age aka old age is a big factor in slowing one down during the day. Roderick

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    1. Roderick, in some ways I have to match the pace of R who eight years older than me.

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  2. My retirement looks very different to anything I had envisaged too.
    Mind you, I get up earlier now than I did while I was working. Up yes, but not showered or dressed before 5. And medication means that breakfast is later too.
    I am usually ready to go out early. My smaller portion is not. Getting up at the crack of noon seems to be his default setting at the moment.

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    1. EC, I was expecting the wrath of gods from you for me being in bed so late when I know you are not.

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    2. Envy rather than wrath. It isn't virtue which gets me up early. It is pain and insomnia neither of which I would wish on anyone (except politicians).

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  3. 7.00 Wake. Go back to sleep.

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  4. Although I do not work at a proper job, I am up at 5:30 and let dogs out. They come in, eat their breakfast, while I have my coffee. The day has begun and will continue on until 7:30 when my dishes are washed and by 8:30-9 I am in bed.

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    1. Maribeth, you are clearly an early person, but then so am I really.

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  5. This election has just sapped any motivation I have. I will feel much better once I have an idea how this is going to go.

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    1. Debby, for many nothing will change I guess, regardless of what happens. No commentator here is game to predict an outcome.

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  6. I thought I would have swaths of free time when I retired. Mysteriously, there were no swaths. Perhaps this is because the house also retired at the same time and began to fall apart. Just keeping it upright with duct tape and a thumb tacks is about all I can manage. I also thought I would do so much reading, listening to music, playing the piano, etc during the seven-plus months of the corona-virus stay-at-home. I've read a few books, listening to 2-3 CDs, but the piano continues to gather dust.

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    1. Cynthia, if you happen to find those swaths, do share them as I am missing some too. The same for me regarding lock down. So much imagined, so little achieved.

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  7. 'Be anywhere before 11.' Ha ha. I only make morning appointments kicking and screaming. We don't like to set the alarm clock.
    How are you feeling?

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    1. Sandra, I bet you do your best writing in the morning. I am fine now thanks.

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  8. PS Forgot to mention Dr. Fauci has really been praising Australia, in particular Melbourne, for their handling of COVID.

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    Replies
    1. Pity no one in government ever listened to Fauci.

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  9. I really resent getting out of my PJs which I had to do for labwork today. My days would be boring to some but not me. But I have fallen down the hole of absolutely no discipline whatsoever. Like a toddler let loose with enough food and toys not to notice everyone's gone.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, does it really matter? We still do what we have to do.

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  10. Retirement and reality - never the twain shall meet. I’ve found the words....plans, expectations, reality, just don’t apply to retirement. Take each day at a time has been my motto....as long as I get my early cuppa tea (kettle on as I wander past on my way to the loo) I’m happy

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    1. Cathy, at least I have some routine.

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  11. I can so relate to your post today. We worked outside all day yesterday and today it's recovery day. Its so good that there's now no pressure to get things done.

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    1. Cheryl, you do have to pace yourself when you are a bit older.

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  12. I think we have an imagine life and then what realities.
    Stay Safe and Coffee is on

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  13. I imagined my retirement differently too, if I'd followed the imaginary plan I'd have walked several thousand miles and lost 30kg by now. Instead I find myself sleeping a whole lot more and taking naps too. I do avoid the computer until after breakfast and dishwashing, bedmaking, reading the paper and doing the puzzles. Then I'll water my garden and neighbours garden if it hasn't rained overnight and finally get to the computer just before lunch, or 10:30/11:00.

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    Replies
    1. River, you too have some kind of routine, which is a good thing.

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  14. My actual (not imaginary) plan was to sit back and watch all the dvds I've collected purely for retirement entertainment.

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    1. River, that too is one where I have really failed. I am not a great tv watcher anyway.

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  15. Surely, when we're retired we can please ourselves. Hang around in dressing-gown and slippers until Tea Time. Personally I stick to my routine of being up by 5 am every morning.

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    Replies
    1. Cro, that is true but I feel guilty at times for my lack of getting out and about, but then of course we couldn't for three months.

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  16. I decided to retire from my TAFE lectureship on my 70th birthday, before we had ever learned of the word Covid. It took a lot of planning in advance because I was afraid of being bored stupid, and I resented the loss of income. The trick was to create and fulfil definite responsibilities eg working at the local museum half a day a week, working for a charity with a specific role, creating and participating in a Blog Carnival etc. etc.

    Day time tv will just make you depressed.

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    Replies
    1. Hels it is hard to imagine you ever being bored. You seem to do so much.

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  17. I wake up at 7am because I have to be at work at 8.15 otherwise I would sleep in for sure, as I'm a night owl who goes to sleep around midnight. Hopefully when I retire I will just sleep until 8 or 9 for sure, lol.

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    1. Sami, midnight plus 8 hours sleep is 8am. I will guess you will get up at 9.15.

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  18. As you might know Andrew, I go to bed when I'm tired and that's late into the evening/night, it seems always coming across something interesting on the internet just before bedtime so have to look it up :) up late in the morning time but always before 10am...if we have to be somewhere before 10am, we get up much earlier as in 7am or 8am.

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    1. Margaret, there is always just one last thing to check on the net before you shut down. Yes, if you have to be somewhere........like a medical appointment at 9.30, bah.

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  19. That's funny. Best laid plans.

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  20. Did I read that right Andrew, since Covid you have become a morning flasher 😁😁😁

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