Saturday, September 19, 2020

Recommended reading

I wasn't going to post today. As I write this on Friday, I have a real case of the sads, no matter how privileged I may seem to some. Yesterday's post was a fail. For all I churn out of course not everything works and people can be cruelly critical at times. No matter. I've been at this blogging stuff for a long time, like 16 years. People come, people go. Onwards and upwards.

Oh, Blogger has changed again for me. What is that 1 in the left hand side bar? Why is there a left hand side bar at all? Well, I will see how it goes. Ok, they are line numbers. I don't really need them.

Former host of ABC TV Breakfast Virginia Trioli is now coming up to her first anniversary as ABC Melbourne radio morning host. She is absolutely brilliant on air. She is challenging, witty, quick thinking, funny and quick to call evasive, stalling and waffling politicians to account . We in Melbourne are privileged to have her on air. She also writes a weekly column for ABC.

Ah, I found something to click on the left and I am back to the old new Blogger. The phrase 'if it ain't broke don't fix it' comes to mind.

Now where was I? Ah yes, Trigger Trioli. What she wrote this week really cut to the chase for me. It is how so many of us feel. We crack at the drop of a hat. I don't remember crying when I was young but now I can just so easily tear up, as Trioli who was interviewing an old digger (army man, a Rat of Tobruk) and he started crying but said to her, don't worry about old man tears. And don't you worry about old man self pity.

You can read her column here

41 comments:

  1. It's not a bad thing for a man to cry.

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    1. Real men may not eat quiche Gigi, but real men have emotions and should show them.

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  2. I read her piece a few days ago and it really, really resonated with me. I have begun to view tears as toxins which NEED to be shed. And shed them I do. I also leak happy tears. I am a cryfest.
    Incidentally, a very clever blogger has found a way to revert to legacy blogger. And revert I have.

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    1. EC, emotions are so raw at the moment. I like your thoughts about shedding toxins. I will struggle on with new Blogger. I always find work arounds when something doesn't work.

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  3. What a brilliant column. I burst into tears in my car today as I was playing a track from the Chieftains - Heart of Stone. Knowing I'd never see them live again, feeling that tribal music crawl into my bones and and settle into my sorrow.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, it ain't easy at the moment and I understand your emotions and frustrations at times. R says to me he doesn't think he up to overseas travel anymore. That is a real turning point in our lives.

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  4. So I Personally Tend To Look At It This Way

    What Does The Letter E Stand For In Emotion??

    Energy

    When Our Bodies Store Something, We Often Have A Build Up. But Our Mind Throws Up A Road Block And We Fester About It For Days, Weeks, Etc

    Finally The Gates Open And We Become Emotional. The Energy Rushes Throughout Our System And We Might Cry, Physically Harm, Or In My Case, Ride My Bike Like There Is No Tomorrow.

    Brother, Cry All You Want. I Only Ask That You Learn From It, Understand Both Sides, And Be The Better Human Because Of It.

    Until Next Time,
    Go Team Human

    P.S. Just Remember, You Are Loved

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    1. I like your thoughts Padre. Shed the emotion and Go Team Human!

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  5. I think it must be hard to be positive and happy living in Melbourne at the moment. You are showing the stress and tiredness of it all just like my daughter is. Having to homeschool the kids has been a challenge and now two weeks of no schooling but nowhere to go either. I feel sorry for you all. I hope it will be over soon.

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    1. Diane, it is an absolute nightmare for parents with young children, as I have discovered from conversations with residents in our building who have young children. No back yard for them to play in.

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  6. It now seam to be changing a lease once month. Maybe it all my head.

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  7. I've had a serious case of the sads myself lately, don't really know why, unless it's a bit of stress caused by neighbours all needing something (not all the neighbours, just a few) and I can't say no because they are older than me and really do need the help with whatever it is, but can't they ask someone else now and again? I find myself just wanting to stay in bed sleeping all day.

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    1. River, you are picking up the slack for your neighbours that should be done by someone else. R feels very much like you.

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  8. Better weather should see your mood change a little Andrew. Have you ever considered taking Vitamin B as well as Vitamin D. .Both help with counteracting mood swings and depression.
    After my episode earlier in the year I upped my daily D and took a course of B.....and certainly am feeling much better ( no more tears) - even though conditions here in Melbourne became more stressful and restrictions tightened.

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    1. Thanks Cathy. I don't think I am vitamin deficient and peoples' apparent lack of vitamin D seems to be a bit of a rort on behalf of drug companies. I will look at Vitamin B.

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    2. Certainly not a root on behalf of drug companies Andrew, Vitamin D levels are part of a standard blood screening test I have taken yearly. It has been suggested deficiencies may be a factor relating to anxiety and depression and yes sunlight as well as various foods can help but proven low levels need to be supplemented (artificially)
      Not suggesting you may be deficient - just suggesting an alternative solution to your woes
      Take care
      Cathy

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    3. Cathy, I truly don't know. When I was working and exposed to plenty of sunlight my doctor told me I was Vitamin D deficient and I began taking Vitamin D supplement medication. Then I listened to Doctor Norman Swan's RN Health report when he spoke to experts all over the world about Vitamin D and while I can't really remember what was said, I decided I didn't need to take Vitamin D supplements anymore.
      Thanks for your concern. I am ok really. I just selfishly want my old life back.

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    4. If your dairy intake is the full fat kind, milk, cheese, butter and not the reduced fat or skim varieties, you should have a good Vitamin D level, you get enough sunshine on your daily walks. Egg yolks and oily fish are also good sources of Vitamin D.

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  9. Haven't listened to the lady but it is good if you like the person on the radio or the TV.
    Emotional, well as we get older we are more emotional, it's nature and probably more so when in certain situations.
    Take care :)

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    1. Margaret, it is interesting how we become more emotional in our older years. Interesting.

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  10. Not only do we become wiser with age, we also can let go of the trivial and focus on the important!

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    1. Hels, I'd like to think so, but I am not so sure.

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  11. Good writing and good journalism are rare, and inspiring.

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    1. Travel, I know you have some great journalists in your country but they are not heard or read around the world.

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  12. My father used to cry at TV commercials! Our hearts do become softer as we age. (And yet we become grumpier.)

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    1. Steve, I guess you could say we wear our emotions on our sleeves more when we are older.

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  13. My husband cries all the time at things he sees on TV, real or fictional. He's lucky. I envy him that ability. I've lost that ability. My antidepressant flattens all my emotions. I don't like it, and being on an antidepressant seems like what Thomas Jefferson said about the institution of slavery: it's like having a wolf by the ears. You're afraid to keep holding on and you're afraid to let go.

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    1. Cynthia, that is such a good analogy. I can't imagine what it is like for you.

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  14. I still refer to VT as Trimboli from time to time. When she worked in Sydney, I had a listener call her that, and it has stuck.

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    1. That's funny James. I only just looked up who her husband is. Interesting.

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    2. He's a good bloke too

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    3. Indeed, and respected.

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  15. I can imagine it must be so frustrating and quite hard to feel positive right now, specially for those living in Victoria.
    I also feel tearful quite often nowadays.

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    1. Sami, at least our numbers are going in the right direction.

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  16. I read her article Andrew, very good. I do understand how horrible it all is but hopefully I don't upset you by saying it could be worse. There are no bombs falling around us, noone is shooting at us and as yet there have been no food restrictions, no coupons needed. It's tough I know but it could be tougher, ask that WW2 veteran. Don't be upset with me ok, love you lots 💜💜💜💜💜

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    1. Grace, of course you are quite right and even just looking at what is happening overseas is awful.

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  17. Sorry Andrew, that was thoughtless of me and probably the last thing you needed, apologies 💙

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    1. Not at all Grace. You are correct about we birds in gilded cages.

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  18. It's quite odd Andrew. I'm a real crier, usually. But currently, I feel quite ice like. Almost like if I start to cry, I will dissolve and never stop.

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