Saturday, September 12, 2020

Readin', writin' and 'rithmatic

Dora asked me for an explanation of our education system here in Australia. I can only speak for our state.

There is kindergarten to begin with at the age of three or four. This is almost like child care or creche. I don't think parents have to pay have to pay for kindergarten but probably they do for creche.

Proper education begins at the age of five with Prep Year. At six they will start level one and continue on until level six, where they will change to a secondary school or college at the age of twelve and continue their education for another six years to level twelve. There will be final exams for them in year twelve and depending on their results, may or may not get a good score to enter university. 

But within this they could attend a normal free state education for their whole education, or a private non religious or very religious school. My niece Jo is not unusual in that her early schooling was at a good state primary school but because she is pretty smart, her parents thought it would benefit her to attend a non religious private school. Of course she has barely been at school this year because of closures and she learns at home. She doesn't mind learning at home but does miss the social interaction at school. 

Further, it they do well with entrance exams, they could enter Melbourne Boys High or MacRobertson's Girls' High, respectively for boys and girls and schools for the gifted but funded by the state. 

Then there are a couple of government funded and private alternative secondary schools for the artistic and perhaps those who just don't fit into the normal education system. 

Teacher's Aids are provided for those students with disabilities but I am not sure that works terribly well.


25 comments:

  1. That sounds similar to the education system in my territory - though prep year is new to me.
    You have forgotten (deliberately?) the school chaplains that were forced on every school. Chaplains who had to come from a religious background to offer support to the students. I don't have any problem with offering support to the students but the insistence on the religious (Christian) qualification sticks in my craw.

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    1. I remember Religious Instruction classes where I sat at the back of the room and read whatever I wanted until I got kicked out to the school library instead.

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    2. I had forgotten about Chaplains EC, Howard's work wasn't it? I connect chaplains in my mind with religion although I know some are not but proselytising was the buzz word for some of them. Support by school counsellors = student support.

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    3. River, they did me no harm. I didn't take a lot of notice and clearly the effort was wasted on me. I did find Joseph's technicolour coat a bit interesting. Gay!

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  2. Hope You Two Are Able To Adventure On Outside And Shoot Some Photos - Would Enjoy A Spring Season Collaboration Of Sights - The More Random The Better

    Cheers

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    1. I am trying Padre but we are so limited to where we can go and how far. Five kilometres, for work, food, individual supermarket shopping, exercise or caring purposes, and of course masked.

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  3. Very similar to hear and our province has reasonable university costs. Up to a few years ago religion was still rampant in our schools and one can still see the symbolism of saints in the hospitals which I find extremely creepy.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, there are still some religious traces in some of our private hospitals and nor do I like it. I will probably write another post about universities here, but yours sound less expensive for students.

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  4. I hope you're not suggesting that 'artistic' people are misfits (but, of course they are!).

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    1. Cro, I love both and they are such an important and creative part of our society. God forbid that everyone was as boring as I am.

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  5. There is a fee structure for kindy Andrew. Government covers about 65% parents the other plus other incidentals per term

    This is for a couple In a nearby council

    https://www.mika.org.au/kinders//croydon-central-kindergarten

    https://www.mika.org.au/kinders//maroondah-pre-school

    And this is for mine - can’t find actual fees but scroll down to see ‘other charges’ .....includes a new to me fee of actually paying an application fee!

    https://www.yrkinders.com/enrolment/fees/


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    1. Cathy, kindy is not cheap at all, although I note free for health care card holders. Thanks for the links. I will ask my mother about my kindy. I am sure it was council provided by City of Oakleigh and free.

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  6. When Melbourne High divided into a boys' school (Melbourne Boys High) and a girls' school (MacRob), I think they were the only sex-segregated high schools in Victoria. My beloved, on the other hand, went to a boys' high school in Sydney; he didn't see girl until he went to university :(

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    1. Hels, were they divided? I think Melb Boys' High was around long before Mac.Rob. But your point stands about them being the only segregated high schools. Did J go to Fort Street Boys'?

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    2. He went to Sydney Boys High, which was a selective government school. However I think in many Sydney high schools, boys and girls lived completely separate lives.

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    3. If you look at old school photos it seems that in NSW where numbers permitted primary school classes were separated into girls and boys until about 1960. Maybe not "infants."

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    4. That's interesting about the segregation Hels. I don't remember that at all here aside from the schools I'v mentioned and I've just remembered there is also Melbourne Girls' College in Richmond.

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    5. MC, I don't think that was the case here. I will check with my mother.

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    6. Now that you mention it...I remember grades six and seven being segregated.

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  7. South Australia is the only Australian state to still have primary school students until year 7. This is slowly changing with a few schools now moving year 7 to high school, but it's slow going with some high schools not being ready to take the year 7's until 2021 or 2022. Apparently they need to build extra facilities.

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    1. River, that is a bit of a hangover to the past. Even here in my Mother's time children finished school at year 7. I suppose it doesn't matter too much now that all students go on to secondary education.

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  8. Similar here.
    Not even public schools are free as they once were.

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    1. Margaret, indeed not and I probably should have mentioned all the extra charges by our government schools. But at least here, there is help for those who can't afford the extra charges.

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  9. Referring to some secondary schools as "college" is unusual to an American ear, where college is a postsecondary or University level institution.

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    1. Travel, yes our terms are very different for schools, as I already knew. College in American slasher movies is tertiary.

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Democracy is all very well, but why give it to the people? - Audrey Forbes-Hamilton.