Thursday, September 10, 2020

I was attacked

We thought it was a raven on our balcony but turned out to be pied currawong. We hear them calling often enough. We had another currawong visit a couple of days later. Of all the birds we have seen on our balcony I don't think we have had a raven although they are plentiful. Maybe they don't like heights.

While out on my ISO walk yesterday afternoon I felt the flapping of wings nearby and a repeated clacking noise and it happened twice. I looked around and while the normal culprit of bird attacks on humans, our magpie and I could see one on the ground, there was a wattle bird sitting in a tree looking at me with malevolence in its eyes. Not a swooping magpie to be seen.

Once home I checked online and yes, wattle birds do swoop and make a clacking noise with their beaks. Unlike magpies, they don't make contact. Just as well.

It is spring here and the birds have younguns and are very protective.

I mentioned this to R once home and he said that there is magpie who has targeted him across the road twice. Odd that he had not told me. I am sure he would have it he felt it came seriously close.

The birds recognise people and if you are attacked once, there is a good chance the same bird will attack you again. 

So, if our hoop snakes, drop bears, poison spraying caterpillars, sharks, crocodiles, feral kangaroos, many lethal snakes and poisonous spiders don't get you, maybe our birds will. 

The Australian magpie is nothing like the European magpie.

The pied currawong. 

And he or she who attacked me, the red wattle bird.

32 comments:

  1. I remember being attacked by this raven when I ran on a trail in Toronto. Every morning she would swoop on my head. Springtime. Nest time. I wore a heavy headband to counteract.

    Your birds are beautiful. Nice shots.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, maybe our ravens are different but I don't recall of one ever attacking a human.

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  2. And I thought you were gay bashed

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    1. Never have been John and I am no longer recognisably gay.

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  3. I have a lot of maggies and currawongs around here...but they all know me well, and would never attack me

    Every day they do melodiously serenade me while hovering around just outside my sliding door.

    Along with the kookaburras and butcher birds, they have a feed of fresh meat scraps every afternoon...so we're all good mates. They won't ever attack the hand that feeds them. :)

    And before you start reprimanding me for feeding the native birds...they are not dependent on my hand-outs. I'd rather the birds benefit from the meat than the scraps from the meat I cut up for my two furry mates be wasted. The birds get the scraps rather than said scraps being thrown into the rubbish.

    They all have their wrist watches set on their dinner time! :)

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    1. Lee, I have been known to feed native animals but in this case I was just walking past. I expect magpie attacks although they must be so used to people at the moment, I didn't expect it from a wattle bird. Admittedly it was a path not too many take.

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  4. I am sorry that you experienced the incident of being attacked by the wattle bird.

    Hopefully their food supply in nature will be more so that they no longer attack humans.

    Get well soon, Andrew.

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    1. Just protecting their young Himawan, just as humans do.

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  5. We have many magpies around here and none of them swoop me. I talk to them every time I see them, so they are used to me and a neighbour has a small family of magpies that she feeds every day, they wait on the guttering above her front porch.
    Now I know what a pied currawong looks like, thanks.

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    1. River, yes it is usually strangers, not people they recognise and feel no threat from. Number 12 on this list and you can hear a pied currawong https://www.birdsinbackyards.net/birds/featured/Top-40-Bird-Songs

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  6. The only bird I've ever been 'attacked' by was a Swan. They're BIG.

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    1. Cro, I don't know if our swans attack. They can certainly approach and you feel fear.

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  7. Wattle birds can be quite feisty. They have sworn at me rather than swooped, but I have seen them swoop cats - ours and others.
    It is only the male magpies which swoop, and for a very brief period. However I have noticed that signs are going up around town warning people that a magpie in the area is being particularly defensive.

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    1. EC, yes, wattle birds are very aggressive birds, and towards other bird species. That's a good idea to put up signs where there is a swooping bird.

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  8. Goodness that wasn't a nice experience, thank goodness it didn't claw you.
    Year before last up in Airlie Beach a magpie attacked a man walking down by the beach, he had sun glasses on, but the bird knocked his glasses off and pecked his eye, he lost his sight.

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    1. Margaret, what a truly awful story. The poor man. I thought because I wear glasses I would be safe from an eye attack.

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  9. Its scary when they attack you. Lapwings or plovers also can have a go at you.

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    1. Diane, maybe walks past trees aren't a good idea in spring.

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  10. Friendly flightless waterfowl would never attack. Penguins Rule!

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  11. When I was ‘attacked’ in the park a few years ago by a rogue magpie it was the beak clacking that bothered me more than the swooping.
    My ‘local’ ones here in the back garden don’t seem to bother - I know it’s protective behaviour so maybe they do know and recognise those they trust.
    I see the currawongs in the trees but never at ground level

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    1. Cathy, so magpies do that beak clacking too. Once they establish you are not a threat they are ok.

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  12. I just got an image of you duck diving to get away from a protective mother wattle bird. On one of our walks recently I must have been too close to a willy wagtail next, honestly you wouldn't believe it, it pecked at my shoes and swooped me, you know tiny they are but I was terrified.. much to Aimee and P's amusement 😉

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    1. Grace, I didn't even have time to duck. It all happened so quickly. I remember your shoes being pecked.

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  13. Yikes! This reminds me so much of the movie The Birds by Alfred Hitchcock, and had me scared to see birds for weeks! Hugs, RO

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    1. RO, the movie still scares me to this day.

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  14. We get wattle birds in our back garden, but they haven't attacked us yet.
    There are plenty of magpies in the park across the street and if we working in the front garden they tend to come to our driveway and I give them a couple of walnuts and they go back to the park. Apparently they don't attack those who feed them, so I hope I'm safe :)
    A few years ago we had a wagtail nesting in our old Hills Hoist now serving as a veggie cover, and she used to attack the cats if they got near the area.

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    1. Sami, yeas it is when you are a stranger in their area that you are a problem. I would think a cat could easily swat a wagtail to the ground.

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  15. They are brave little creatures, aren't they, to attack an adult human. The parenting instinct is strong.

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    1. They are indeed Jenny. They have the advantage of surprise.

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  16. By the way, Andrew, I thoroughly enjoyed the "rabbit" joke a few posts ago. Thanks for the smile.

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    1. I had to think for a minute to remember the joke.

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