Tuesday, September 08, 2020

How to ruin your image in two easy lessons

It is almost impossible to ignore sport nowadays as the media relentlessly shoves it down our throats. High flying sportspeople are tall poppies and are especially vulnerable to being cut down by the media and the public should they misbehave.

Not always but at times I do take some care when I write. You can say the same things in many ways and it is nice to read something a little more polished and elegant. I wonder if that happens with other languages. As you can see below, I made some serious rearrangements to my opening paragraph. Whether it is better, you be the judge.

In these times it impossible to ignore matters of sport. Especially vulnerable to being cut down as a tall poppy are the high flyers in the sporting world.

In these times it impossible to ignore matters of sport. High flying sportspeople are especially vulnerable to being cut down as tall pop

In these times it impossible to ignore matters of sport. High flying sportspeople are tall poppies especially vulnerable to being cut down should they (remove swear word and up)

In these times it impossible to ignore matters of sport. High flying sportspeople are tall poppies especially vulnerable to being cut down should they misbehave.

It is almost impossible to ignore sport nowadays. The media shoves it at us without relent. High flying sportspeople are tall poppies especially vulnerable to being cut down by the media and the public should they misbehave.

It is almost impossible to ignore sport nowadays as the media relentlessly shoves it down our throats. High flying sportspeople are tall poppies especially vulnerable to being cut down by the media and the public should they misbehave.

You've already guessed where I am going with this. You could hardly avoided the appalling behaviour a couple of days ago by Novak Djokovic. Up until this year I had a benign view of him. He was an excellent tennis player who only made headlines because of his tennis achievements. 

Then he arranged the tennis tour that led to a breakout of COVID infections among the players, including Djokovic himself and his wife. It was such irresponsible behaviour by a person in the public eye.

Now this awful incident where he slogged a tennis ball in anger without knowledge of where it would go and it hit a line judge.

I was assured that early in his career Roger Federer's behaviour wasn't always the best but his dad gave him a good talking to and so far as I know, his behaviour since on court has been impeccable. 

What we need to remember that these are essentially workplaces and tennis player behaviour would not be tolerated at all in any other workplace.....well, maybe on a football field.  Did the rot start with John McEnroe where bad behaviour began to be tolerated? 

28 comments:

  1. I really don't know where it started, but some poppies should be cut down before they are allowed to seed. Sadly we have been too slow in a number of arenas.

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  2. Oh Andrew, I was watching the match when this occurred! I was sickened to watch the Lines-judge crumple up and fall like a sack of potatoes. The reruns of the incident sickened me.
    Years ago, Novak was a nice person. Life was going on well for him until his wife caught him with his nickers down in Las Vegas! It appears our happy family man, was in fact a ladies man when he was on the road.
    His wife took their baby and left. He took time off, and she did take him back, but since that time he has been angry and hostile when I have watched him. He is no longer the happy go lucky man he was.
    The punishment for his crime at the US Open is not nearly enough. No he did not intend to do this, but he was so careless.
    It reminded me of the man who killed my daughter. He didn't mean to do it, but he was stoned, and careless driving a box van truck. And she is gone.
    He was not punished well either. Only lost his license for taking a life.

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    1. Maribeth, what interesting colour. I had no idea of his shenanigans. Just losing your license for such dangerous driving and killing someone sounds way inappropriate.

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  3. He hit a line judge? Now the cartoon in today's paper makes sense :)
    I'm pretty sure the rot set in harder and faster with John McEnroe's appalling tantrums being "tolerated".
    The only 'cure' is to ban them from playing for a certain time, with repeated bans if the behaviour continues.

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    1. River, yes, rub them out for a time and for a longer time if bad behaviour happens again.

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  4. I've never been a fan of Djokovic. And, my feelings towards him are unlikely to change.

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    1. Lee, whether I like him or not matters not. His behaviour was bad. No excuses.

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  5. Do you remember Johnny McEnroe? He had such horrible temper tantrums on court that we wouldn't allow the boys to watch his games on tv. He too was disqualified from a Grand Slam match.

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    1. Yes Hels. I mentioned him at the end of my post. He is now so sanctimonious.

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  6. At least McEnroe made us laugh, Djokovic is just plain miserable.

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    1. Cro, quite true on both counts.

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  7. I'm sure it wasn't intended.
    He's a funny man, he imitates people well.
    The media have a lot to answer for, the poor women.
    Take care.

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    1. Margaret, there are risks when you do such things. He is old and experienced enough to know that.

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  8. If you watched the match you would have seen this behaviour on two other occasions before he hit the official. I agree there was no intention to hit anyone but he did. He should never have spent 10 mins arguing with the ref about the punishment. Although the lines woman was not seriously hurt she is now having to put up with vile abuse on social media. And to think Djokovic thinks he's the one to start a breakaway player's union.

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    1. Really Marie about two other times? I also thought he immediately accepted the punishment, but there you go. Just doing her job, it is hard to imagine what reason people think she did anything wrong.

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  9. Just one more reason I don't watch sports Andrew, there are enough annoying things going on in the world, to add to it by watching over-paid spoiled brats chasing, hitting or kicking balls would be madness 😁

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    1. Grace, much better things to do with your time, hey.

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  10. You can do almost the same things in other languages ! That reminds me that when I was a child and started to learn English I wondered if there were people who stammered in English or if it was a typical German thing ! My son met Roger Fedderer last year and spent a week with him and a whole publicity crew in the same hotel. He was like everybody and very normal ! I have some photos of both of them but not allowed to show them. I don't remember for which article the publicity was, I think Nike but not so sure.

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    1. Gattina, thanks for the language answer. Yes, stammering is not a language thing. I like that Federer sounds normal. I expect he will retire soon and with great honour.

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  11. You must have been at a loose end last night to come up with all those interpretations of an observation.
    We all succumb to stress - life in the fast athletic lane is certainly stressful. I didn’t see the incident so can’t comment on whether it showed the true person or something that ‘happened on the day’

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    1. Cathy, showing how our language can be rearranged has been on my list for a while, but I intended to feature it, not as an aside. It was daytime when I wrote the post. If you belt a ball with your racquet at full strength and don't know where it will go, that is bad and irresponsible.

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  12. Complex editing process.

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    1. Travel, you can play around till the cows come home with writing.

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  13. Like Maribeth, I've seen this guy change in public, but I believe his being caught by his wife just allowed the world to see that he's really a narcissist who believes that they don't have the same standards as everyone else. He was shocked that he hit the line-judge in the neck, but as you watch him talking to the judges, he smirked and tried to justify his bad act because she didn't go to the hospital. I'm sure his team drew up that response later on to try to cover his tracks. He is who he is. He clearly didn't intend to hit her, but his bad boy antics are the cause. Hugs, RO

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    1. RO, I probably should watch him and the judge, but I don't need to as you have educated me. Thanks.

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  14. I thought of John McEnroe too. I don't know a thing about sports or sportspeople, but I suppose they're all under tremendous pressure -- not that that excuses bad behavior. They're role models, too.

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    1. Steve, at times many of us are under pressure but we use self control and don't hit out. Few major sports people are good role models.

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