Sunday, August 30, 2020

Sunday Selections

Joining with Elephant's Child and others for Sunday Selections. I was out and about in the city and it looks like some of these at least were taken last Spring, just as we have reached the next Spring.

Princess' Theatre, Spring Street. Generally the apostrophe has been dropped but it's still on the theatre itself and is still used at times. The positioning of the apostrophe tells us it was named after two princesses and I did look it up once some years ago, and that is true.


The Comedy Theatre. Unless they have been replaced, the seats are very uncomfortable but we have some good shows there.


Very early buildings in Little Lonsdale Street, once an area for all kinds of vice related activity including the brothels of Madame Brussels who I wrote about a couple of years ago.

https://highriser.blogspot.com/2018/07/madame-brussels-and-mace.html

https://highriser.blogspot.com/2018/09/madame-brussels-at-home.html






This looks like a fine Winter's day. It took some finding out for this post but the Salvation Army Training School is now a backpacker's hotel. Well, it was when I took the photo.


Also in Victoria Parade is the Eastern Hill Fire Station with its tower to look over the city and spot fires. It is now an overpriced Fire Museum and I visited it a few years ago. Not great value.



Looking in the other direction across Victoria Parade.


Turner Alley in the city. I love imagining about bricked up windows and doors.



28 comments:

  1. Never heard of Salvation Army training school. Only time I see them is during Thanksgiving and Christmas, with red kettle and bell ringers

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    1. Dora, The Sallies is quite a large organisation here.

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  2. I am super impressed at the work you did to track down Madame Brussels actual address. And of course she had some powerful and influential men as clients.
    You have my mind wandering (and wondering) about those bricked up doors and windows now. It is still dark and my mind is going to dark places...

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    1. EC, I impressed myself when I reread my post. Yes, who knows what might be behind bricked up things.

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  3. I too am fascinate by what I call "ghost" doors and windows on buildings. Also desire lines - those trails that animals and people create across grass, etc, ignoring the landscaped paths.
    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, the ghost doors and windows always interest me. Desire lines or goat tracks, but the shortest distance.

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  4. Not much ventilation, if any, in those lower buildings. Oh! All I need is the air that I breathe....

    Set in their ways...to be a concreter and bricklayer was a profitable profession by the looks of it!

    Have a good week, Andrew...take care. :)

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    1. Lee, back in the day stonemasons and brick layers had a pretty strong union and were probably reasonably well paid. Pretty hard yakka though.

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  5. You are lucky to have so many lovely old building still standing. I love those last 3 photos!

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    1. I nearly left out the last three photos Cro, thinking they would be of little interest.

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  6. Some very fine old buildings there. I had no idea the Salvation Army had a training school, is that where they learn to paste on those smiles that never falter no matter how wet your tambourine may get?
    Bricked up doors and windows are sad.

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    1. River, lol about the Sallies. There is still a training school in Melbourne in one of our outer suburbs.

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  7. Love the architecture.
    Those last photos are interesting with their pipes and whatnot, built before power, water and sewage I expect - very interesting.
    Take care.

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    1. Margaret, I didn't think of that but yes, the building would have been built before all those were available.

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  8. The Eastern Hill Fire Station must have been amazing in the 1890s. Imagine the original architect accounting for all the service's needs, including fire carts, horses stables, dorms etc.

    Even better, the watchtower was manned all the time, to watch over the very rapidly growing city! Melbourne was the biggest city in Australia until 1905... and will be again by 2025 (pandemic allowing).

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    1. Yes Hels. It would have been a building and a service that would make Melburnians proud back then. Yeah, pandemic allowing.

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  9. Finally a picture of you Lambo.

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    1. Travel, yes I was going to catch a tram but thought I would drive instead.

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  10. Wonderful old buildings. When I lived just outside of Boston, I used to love walking through the streets.
    Oh, if these old buildings could talk, the tales they would tell us!

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    1. Maribeth, many tales, especially in the brothel area.

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  11. Interesting architecture. I, too, wonder about those bricked up windows. Looks weird.

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    1. Gigi, I guess windows became less important and a security risk.

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  12. Lots of lovely old buildings on this walk Andrew, our old Fire Station, both in Perth and Freo are now museums too, I quite enjoyed visiting the Perth one ✨

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    1. Grace, I hope your fire museum is better value than ours.

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  13. The fire museum might not be great value but it's a nice building. I'm surprised someone hasn't turned it into posh flats!

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    1. Steve, I wouldn't have a problem with that as long as the integrity of the building is kept.

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  14. Those bricked up doorways and windows, you wonder what's behind them, or if someone maybe was bricked in there, like a horror movie.

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    1. Strayer, I don't think you are the only one who was thinking like that.

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