Friday, July 10, 2020

Lock Down Mk 2 Day 1

The traffic below The Highrise was much quieter this morning, but not as quiet at Mark 1 lock down.

We did our weekly South Melbourne shopping. No panic buying. Panic buying was a total media beat up. Aldi was overstacked with toilet paper. The numbers of vacant parking spaces in the Aldi carpark is a good indicator of busyness. Pre Christmas, it showed Full at times. Lock Down Mark 1 it showed around 55 spaces vacant spaces. Last week it was down to 27 free spaces. This morning under Lock Down Mark 2, it showed 58 free spaces. The streets were deserted. People who were out went about their business but did not hang around.

The Highrisers sanitised their hands about every five minutes, did not put anything down on a surface apart from our Aldi shopping on a the shopping trolley and checkout belt and we kept our distance. R as always wiped down the shopping trolley with sanitiser wipes.

We did buy a pepper steak pie each from a bakery and a take away coffee from Brazil coffee shop but they did not touch any surface.

R is extremely stressed by Mark 2 Lock Down but logic tells him it is necessary.

I had an online chat with our remaining Brother Friend who now lives in Thailand and I asked him if could the Thai figures of virtual zero infections be believed? Vietnam has even better figures.

His reply was, lock down borders early, mask wearing when in public, hand spray sanitising every time you enter a shop, along with a temperature check, closing public venues and bars, and a night curfew. It was strictly enforced and obeyed. Thailand is now opening up. Its medical system was prepared but not necessary.

I ask why has it all gone so wrong in my state when the rest of country is pretty well zero infections?

If you look at a map of COVID infections in Greater Melbourne they are generally contained to areas with a high Muslim population, yet western Sydney has a high Muslim population, so it can't be the religion or the race. Yet, in Melbourne it seems to be. Eid is the end of Ramadan in late May and is when families get together. The highest cluster is now a Muslim secondary school. Many of the locked down public housing blocks are full of Muslims. Many of the guards at quarantine hotels were Muslim and they interacted with each other and it seems sexually with 'guests' at the hotels, along with being lax about keeping people locked up.

I don't want to be seen as a Muslim basher, but it seems like I am being awfully like that. It is just how I see it.

42 comments:

  1. Personally I do not afraid ofCOVID 19. I AM SURE IT IS DANGEROUS ONLY IN MEDIA.

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    1. It is dangerous for sure, not only in media reports, people are dying painfully everywhere.

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    2. Gosia, you only have to look at the death figures in the US. It is dangerous and the treatment is very unpleasant even if you survive.

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  2. Lower education levels and poverty levels (you mention public housing) are probably two of the strongest drivers of infections of all kinds. Religion can also be a driver if there is too much trust in a god and divine care. But that trust often goes hand in hand with the first two factors I mentioned. As you said, not all Muslim neighbourhoods are experiencing the rise in cases.

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    1. Jenny, I think infections went from quarantine guards to Muslim families and it spread from there. Of course you are correct about education and poverty.

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  3. We have had our first cases in over a month. Three of the four had recently returned from your city (and the fourth is their flatmate).
    I am with jenny_o here. Sadly several churches of the Christian variety have told their congregation that the virus cannot enter their church. A dogmatic statement which has been proved wrong. Poverty and overcrowding are close friends. Very close.

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    1. EC, one religion wanted to continue to sip from the communal cup. You are right of course. I feel like deleting the post, but it is important for views on the day to be heard in years to come.

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  4. I hope you and yours are safe.

    Greetings from London.

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    1. Hello Mr Cuban. No one I know has COVID or had it. So far, so good. Please keep your stylish self safe too.

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  5. It isn't over yet, considering the flu pandemic in 1919 lasted for two years. Take care.

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    1. Cheryl, you are safe in your eyrie. It did indeed last for a long time, with waves of infection.

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  6. Perhaps what occurred last night in Sydney will cause a massive shut-down there very soon...https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/coronavirus-sydney-golden-sheaf-hotel-double-bay-slammed-for-packed-queue/news-story/595e217f569355207c25a8dcface3f12

    Seeing this image makes me boil...to say the very least!!

    There is no wonder I am angry and disgusted! There no little wonder I keep to myself, choosing to live a hermit-like existence...with scenes like this to stoke the fire!!!! The ignorance, selfishness, stupid, arrogance, self-centred, self-righteous attitudes of some in today's society/community...scenes like what occurred in Sydney last night...is why I am feeling the way I feel! Brainless (I won't call them here what I am calling them here to myself)!

    Put them all in a leaky boat and set them forth out into the Pacific Ocean with a strong westerly blowing on the stern!!! And, I am not kidding!!

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    1. Lee, that is a shocking photo of a terrible scene. Why don't young people understand? One infected person from Melbourne could have infected half the queue. If you've seen the figures for Victoria today, it is a disaster. A forty year Broadway actor died a couple of days ago.

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    2. Yep! I know, Andrew. The Vic figures today are shocking. People just have to wake-up to themselves...stop being so insensitive...realise there are others in the world...not only themselves!

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  7. We are on the down slope here in New Hampshire. That being said, I still wear a mask and keep my distance. Oh, how I long to be held and hugged.
    I'm sending warm wishes to you and R.

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    1. Maribeth, the holiday influx didn't cause a problem then. Good to know.

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  8. The guards at the quarantine hotels were from private companies and therefore not accountable in the way that public servants, army and police are. They may have been under-paid but they made up for it by selling rights and privileges to the desperate sods in quarantine.

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    1. Hels, private security has always been out of control. I don't like seeing private security, including outside synagogues. I wasn't aware of the selling of rights etc. Interesting and I guess, obvious really.

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  9. Poverty is a killer in many, many ways. And the carriers of these killer viruses and pandemics are usually poor and very ignorant.

    Having said that, I see the privileged trotting around without masks feeling a kind of immunity. Godgiven perhaps.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, you are right about the privileged. We don't have too much extreme poverty in the Muslim community.

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  10. The only thing is keeping Covid is our population. 9 people per square mile. (1.6 kilometer) But today it was report a 40 year male have and resides in area.

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    1. Dora, you are right. It is easier to distance when you have plenty of space.

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  11. Over in the UK, the city of Leicester is in lockdown again after another serious wave of virus. The population there is heavily Asian/Arab, and the outbreak has been blamed on the end of Ramadan, and too much irresponsible mingling.

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    1. Cro, that is interesting and rather confirms my theory.

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  12. Nice to know your Aldi is well stocked with toilet paper. I went to Woolie's this morning for the newspaper and some tissues and was surprised to see none of the cheap $1 tissues and very little toilet paper. It seems people here are stocking up again. So I bought a pack of double length while I was there, I don't need it, but if any of my elderly neighbours runs out I can help out with a roll.
    I'm shocked at the daily news of more and more cases and quite worried about it spreading even though the borders are now closed except for essential services such as cargo deliveries etc.
    I hesitate to point fingers too, but it does seem to be more prevalent in areas where people rely on traditional mass gatherings as a lifestyle.

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    1. River, that is a nicer way of describing it than I did. I wish I had put more thought into the post.

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  13. Once again outsourcing is the problem but it won't happen again. People complained about the police but at least they knew what they were doing after the initial shock of another lock down. I see the Sikh community that did sterling work during the bushfires were cooking for the different diets needed.
    Locking down the Peninsula stops the wealthy from getting to their holiday homes, buying food the locals need and trailing virus along the various nursing homes on their way.

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    1. Jah Teh, I love Sikhs. They are so community minded and never mind many being tall, dark and mysterious. I just saw on the news a Docklands couple were fined twice today for trying to get to their Phillip Island holiday house.

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  14. I live in Granville so this area is full of middle eastern people not all are muslim our lot are very close to family but also.very clean maybe that has something to do with it.
    Merle..............

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    1. Merle, yes there would be a lot of Christians too. I suggest that pretty well every immigrant to Australia in the last few decades is personally very clean.

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  15. The spread is about human behaviour, many people find it hard to restrict social interaction, and social interaction leads to spread be it a wedding, funeral, religious gathering, birthday party, or political rally. It is difficult to convince people to change. A friend died in March, her father was the only one told when the burial would be, and then was asked to remain in his car at a distance from the workers. The father of a co worker was buried in Philly on Monday, 30 family member crammed together in a tent at the graveside (it was raining.) They should have remained in their cars and watching from a distance

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    1. Travel, yes that is it. It is too close when people you know or know of die.

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  16. It is what it is Andrew, the facts are the facts and all that.. hard not to come to the conclusion you did. I can't imagine how frustrating it must be for the general public ✨

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    1. Grace, they are part of the general public and that is how it gets into the wider community.

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  17. But it sounds like it's not being Muslim that made them vectors for the disease. It just happened to arise in the Muslim community at a critical time (Eid) and be passed around there. I mean, if it had arisen at Christmas time, it would have spread like wildfire among Christians. Right?

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    1. Steve, I am not sure about your conclusion but perhaps you are correct. Most happened after an easing of restrictions.

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  18. Hey its everywhere in the US seems like. We will never get a handle on it with the President we have spouting his never ending bullshit that defies all reason, I'm afraid. We need a leader and we don't have one, so onward goes the virus and the bodies mount. Ignorance is a desired value here. The less you know, the more you talk and the more likely you will end up as a politician, small or large.

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    1. Strayer, it seems to affect the poor and immigrants worse than others. He would hardly care about them at all.

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  19. Oh dear me, it's sad that so many people have the virus.
    More again today but for me that's expected as I read about all the testing that's being done to safe guard others.
    Didn't know in those buildings who lived there but understand now.
    Take care and I would be concerned if we had several cases here too...border still closed.

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    1. Not good for your economy Margaret, but the alternative is worse. We have to remember the figures now are from one to two weeks ago when people were exposed.

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  20. Since a week we nearly have a "normal" life, we have to wear masks in shops and closed places. The restaurants are open 4 people on a table then one table empty etc
    The cinemas are open now too but you have to leave a seat free between two ! I only go out to empty our house that's why I have nearly no time for blogging !

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    1. Gattina, that's how we were going until it all went terribly wrong, worse than the first round.

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