Friday, July 24, 2020

A Gay Day

Just a quickie. I don't really know if I sound gay, and while I speak a little strangely with a curious accent, I don't have the classic gay voice that can cut through 100 decibel music on a dance floor. I've mentioned him before and no need to say who it is again but there is an ABC TV reporter who doesn't hide that he is gay and does have the classic gay (we used to call it faggy) voice. This is a manner of speaking whereby you can straight away know someone is gay.

His reporting is good, and was especially good during our terrible fires early this year and his voice and diction are crystal clear.

After ten years of not reading gay media, I have started doing so again online. Here are some links to stories I found interesting, the first being the inspiration for this short post.

https://www.starobserver.com.au/opinion/dont-worry-about-your-gay-voice/196370

Disturbing but a good result.

https://www.starobserver.com.au/news/national-news/victoria-news/melbourne-synagogue-distances-itself-from-vile-remarks/196724

Go girlfriend. She didn't pay a 1 million dollar fine imposed by Russia.

https://www.starobserver.com.au/news/madonna-refused-to-pay-russian-fine/196851

Gay men are always so nice and kind. Nah, not always. Aside from bitchy queens, some are just nasty pieces of work.

https://www.starobserver.com.au/news/pornstars-racism-assault-caught-on-camera/196860

And if that is not enough reading for you, try the post by John Gray of Wales about unkind comments when he wrote a quite positive post. It really is hard for straight people to understand what lives were like for gay men of my age and older. I was lucky that I worked in a job with much diversity and I didn't have family or cultural problems, but still, I remember the culture in my early life that made me feel bad about myself. Ok, this is a proper post, not a quickie.

https://disasterfilm.blogspot.com/2020/07/pride-again.html

28 comments:

  1. I can relate, as a woman, to what gay men feel. I was always on the outside looking in so to speak, terrified of walking alone at night, denied the education my brothers got, etc. etc. etc. In Toronto, many of my friends were gay, still terribly dear to me, and my younger daughter is gay. I remember many nights, late into the night, discussing rights of women and rights of gays, so much overlapping in our demands to be seen as equal. I have a few close gay friends out here one not self declared as he (terribly masculine) can't abide the Brokeback Mountain jokes shared amongst the macho hetero males around him - some of which, he confided, are so far into the closet but have propositioned him quietly.

    A complicated world indeed. I do believe one of my bros is a closet gay as my gay daughter spotted him in a gay club in Cork.

    So much stigma and shame.

    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. WWW, I believe closet cases should only be outed when they speak or act offensively against gays. But assuming those you speak of are of a certain age, I judge them less harshly. Luv, don't you know the story? Your bro went into the pub for a drink and didn't know it was a gay pub.

      Delete
  2. I read John Gray's post and I ached for him. For him and for so many others. We have made steps in the right direction, but obstacles still remain (some of them firmly cemented in place).
    Consideration, compassion, equality are essentials in my eyes - regardless of the person's label.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. EC, a Motherhood statement perhaps, but you are absolutely correct. It is what we should aspire to and achieve.

      Delete
    2. Sometimes our mothers were right.

      Delete
    3. Again, EC has said what I feel.
      Lordy, I must be tired tonight. I can't even come up with an original thought :)

      Delete
    4. Never mind Jenny. At times you can only repeat what others have said, just a bit differently.

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. John, I probably have some repressed memories. But no matter.

      Delete
  4. I don't care how someone speaks...as long as I can understand them; they make sense; aren't nasty; they have a good sense of humour; are fair and just; considerate and respectful of others...that's what matters to me. :)

    ReplyDelete
  5. I never even think about things like gay media, I suppose it is a good thing where people can get reassurance they are not alone etc.
    I've known a few gay people through my working years and I don't recall any gay voices, but maybe I just didn't pay attention.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River, gay media is not what it was once, but it is still out there.

      Delete
  6. I remember working with a young lad who had that very gay voice. And I assumed that all who worked there knew he was gay.
    But no. One of my dimmer colleagues said to him one day that he was going to be a great father. She then left the break room, and he turned to me and said, "Maybe, but I'd make a much better mother!"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lol Rozzie. What did we say? Hit someone over the head with a saucepan before they picked up on something?

      Delete
  7. My UK home town is Brighton, an eccentric, bohemian, gay-friendly place on the south coast. I have always been surrounded by people who others might find 'different', and all the better for that. Even back in the dark days when such things were illegal, the Brighton community thrived, and expressed themselves openly. It must be one of the best places to live in the whole of the UK.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cro, from what I know and what I saw during a one day visit, I really liked Brighton. The hills? Not so much, but they tend to make towns more interesting.

      Delete
  8. Living a small conservative area, when it comes to progressive change it happen at a snail pace. Well I shake my head when people think there no gay here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dora, chicken and egg. Gay people will leave until there are more gay people who stay who feel comfortable.

      Delete
  9. If by gay voice you mean the Truman Capote-Liberace-Paul Lynde kind of speaking style, I actually once tried talking like that in a gay bar, even though it's not my natural speaking style. Why would I want to do that? Because after growing up in the macho blue-collar suburbs of Cleveland, Ohio, to speak in such a way seemed...liberating. Unfortunately, the person I was talking to (who was quite a cute young man) thought I was making fun of him, and stormed off. So I went back to speaking in my natural, somewhat butch, style, and had everyone in the bar think I wan an undercover cop instead.

    I'm thinking of turning the experience into a short story. I'm just not sure whether to make it a tragedy or a comedy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kirk, I only know Liberace's voice and I don't think it is really like that. There are heaps of clips on Youtube made by gay men who speak as I describe.

      I think you can write tragic comedy, and I think it would be an interesting read.

      Delete
  10. There are a few people on TV who don't hide that they are gay, good on them.
    Can say I haven't seen the ABC TV reporter, but sometimes you can tell, sometimes can't. For me it doesn't matter as long as it's clear what they are saying.
    Went to John's link and read two posts, he's rather touchy - well that's how I read those posts. Then I don't know what he's been through over the years and at present so really can't comment or have an opinion.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret, while the vast majority of comments were supportive, a couple must have hit a raw nerve with John, perhaps people he thought well of and their comments were a surprise.

      Delete
    2. I think several comments were misjudged and ill informed

      Delete
  11. Loved the post by John Gray Andrew sad that it was necessary ✨ Gosh that porn star was a nasty pasty, very glad he got his just rewards! Make love not war and all that 💜💙

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grace, yes, sad to see such awfulness.

      Delete