Saturday, May 16, 2020

Wheel Slip

Why can't trains can't travel up steep hills? The engine at the front has just an area of millimetres of contact with the steel train line and may have a hundreds or thousands of tonnes of carriages or wagons to move. To move from stationary and get up to speed requires a very low and gentle application of power, whether it be an electric, diesel or steam train. It seems power application is harder to control with steam trains and they so easily go into wheel slip.

For this reason when an engine has to pull a really heavy load, such as Australian iron ore trains, multiple engines are used, up to six or maybe even more, and if that is not enough, maybe a couple at the end to push as well.

You can hear the engine suddenly speed up, as it suddenly blasts out a huge amount of smoke as its powered wheels lose traction.


While this clip worked fine when I first saw it, it has become weird for me with irrelevant voice overs added that change each time I watch it. Just to be on the safe side, here is a train slipping video I prepared someone prepared earlier. 


I've never had this problem before, but the YT video I have embedded won't work thanks perhaps to the new blogging interface. You can click this link: https://youtu.be/_7lwXtVro6c Hmm, not sure that this link will work either. So annoying.

I reverted to the old Blogger interface and all is well. 

24 comments:

  1. I have avoided the new blogger interface but am glad that (for the moment) we can revert if it doesn't work out for us.
    No voice overs at all in the first video, just the sound of the train. Which I think all of us know whether we have travelled on a steam train or not. A part of our culture?

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    1. EC, it may have been a YouTube problem or perhaps my pc needed a restart. It far better to watch and listen to steam trains than ride on them.

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  2. I like luxury, cross continental trains :)

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    1. Hels, I am sure you do and it would matter little to you as to what was pulling your carriage along.

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  3. Trains are great huge beasts, aren't they? And the steam ones are especially "alive" feeling.

    I refuse to even try the "New Blogger" - the old one has everything I need. You're braver than I am!

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    1. Jenny, they really do feel like living beasts. While I wasn't, some people have been forced to the new Blogger.

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  4. Those old steam trains were wonderful. As a boy I used to love seeing them come into my village station.

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    1. Cro, yes R remembers them in England, along with trolley buses.

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  5. Another problem to be aware of with the new blogger. I would think extra engines pushing from behind would be more effective than having so many at the front, but I'm no expert, so we'll take their word for it that six at one end and only two at the other works well enough.

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    1. River, it is a bit like cars, front wheel drive or rear wheel drive. Which is better? I don't know.

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  6. The engine sounded as if it was complaining.

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    1. Cynthia, yes. Don't do this to me, it was saying.

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  7. Haven't tried the new blogger as yet.
    Recall the train slipping going up those steep hill in Queenstown, the steam train when I was ever so much younger.

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    1. Margaret, how unfortunate that we didn't experience that, that I was aware of.

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  8. Durango to Silverton is on my want to do list, my parents rode it one summer. It is in a rather isolated corner of the country.

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    1. Travel, Colorado it seems. Blogger Padre lives there but a good distance away.

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  9. I adore trains, always have, whether my face was full of dirt from the steam and coal or not. Didn't matter. Member of the rail society here even though the cross province trains were taken away forever in the late 80s. A crime. One of the last surviving passengers of the West Cork Railway who remembers it all so clearly. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cork,_Bandon_and_South_Coast_Railway

    I love your railway posts.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, yes the same the world over. The link was interesting. I the line closed in 1961 and what is called Irish Gauge there we call broad gauge here, which was my state's standard but other states had different gauges leading to many problems. We now have broad gauge and standard gauge.

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  10. Both worked fine Andrew, they were wonderful to see. I can't imagine anyone not loving a steam train 🚂

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  11. I have taken the Durango/Silverton RR. We went some years ago when we were going to Hot Air Balloon Fiesta!

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    1. Maribeth, both sound like good fun.

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  12. I never thought how train wheels might slip like that. We have enough derailments around here. I've seen two at least myself since moving over to train town. I call it that because you can sit waiting on train building going on the middle of an intersection for half hour. The railroads don't give one little thought to anybody else. I also call them Ego Monsters.

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    1. Strayer, yes it is a real problem when trains go through the middle of cities and it is dangerous. We are in the process of removing level crossings in Melbourne.

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Before you change something, find out why it is the way it is in the first place - unknown.