Tuesday, March 03, 2020

Town Hall Tuesday

The City of Port Melbourne was absorbed into the City of Port Phillip in the 1990s. With a huge number of wharf worker local citizens, it was very much a left wing Labor dominated council. Wharf workers were once treated in the most appalling manner in the early to mid 20th century until they unionised, and some may think they subsequently went too far with pay and working conditions. City of Port Melbourne included working wharves, houses built by banks for subsidised sale to people and some public housing. You now have to be relatively rich to live there if you are not in public housing. There are highrise buildings along the seafront where a friend lives.

While there was a cable tram along its main road, Bay Street, the cable tram was not replaced by electric trams but buses. As is still the case, cable tram routes replaced by buses have quite good services. I would have to go in to town by tram and catch a bus out to see the town hall, which would be fine, but in this case we were in Port Melbourne in the car and I stopped to take photos.

A train used to run to Port Melbourne and onto both Station Pier and Princes Pier but in the 1980s it was changed to become the 109 tram, ok light rail system. In spite of route 109 having reasonably large trams, it becomes overcrowded, especially in the cruise ship season, to the point where there is a 109 bus running when cruise ships are in port. I wonder if people using the 109 bus have to pay? We were not happy recently having out route 58 tram delayed by the 109 bus using tram tracks in Queensbridge Street and loading people through the single front door at the casino.

The town hall was built in 1883 and is now used as a local library, for community events and private functions. It looks solid and dependable, without too much ostentation.



Next week will be South Melbourne Town Hall, still in the City of Port Phillip and I confess to not taking much notice, and I found something included that I have never seen in Australia but I have in England. Any British person care to guess, or local even?

30 comments:

  1. I don't think we have a Town Hall, but will freely admit I could be wrong.
    The one you feature does look solid and dependable and has more than a little charm.

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    1. EC, no, I don't see why you would have really. It is nice without being ostentatious.

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  2. It looks like a good transition from town hall to a library. Glad it hasn't been abandoned.

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    1. Gigi, there would be huge protests if any of our historic town halls were abandoned or demolished.

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  3. Thinking about all the town halls I have photographed, I was puzzled by what you might have found. Other than clocks, towers and weather vanes I have no idea.

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    1. Marie, what would a similar English building have that this one does not, but next town hall post building will have. The feature in England at least is quite widespread but far from universal.

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  4. I love these useful transitions we fight for them here to no avail and I have to choose my battles so carefully now.

    I love this hall.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, yet the town where you live has so much character and is widely known.

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  5. A bell tower, maybe?

    Lovely old buildings, with so much character.

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    1. Lee, it does have a bell within its clock tower and I heard it strike, but no.

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  6. I'm glad to hear the old building is being used again for a new purpose. Too often here that doesn't happen; the old is simply torn down as a more cost effective solution.

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    1. Jenny, aside from perhaps Toronto and Montreal, I think you are correct. Canada hasn't been great at saving its heritage buildings in many places.

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  7. I love the clock tower. It's always been a favorite thing of mine. Perhaps it's the influence of Big Ben, which I adored.

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    1. Maribeth, I wonder if Big Ben is up and working again?

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  8. I'm too tired to play guessing games, so I'll just wait for next Tuesday. I like the clock tower, and always thought our Adelaide Town Hall had one, but it's on the Post Office building across the road from the Town Hall. I think using the building for a library is a wonderful idea.

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    1. River, I have made the same mistake in Hobart, remembering the clock tower on the wrong building.

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  9. Our town has a clock tower and noon whistle.

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    1. Dora, a whistle!!! Used if there is an emergency?

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  10. I'm guessing the fountain, but seeing as it originally included a police station could there also be some cells?

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    1. Marcellous, not close I'm afraid.

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    1. No Cro, only for special occasions.

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  12. Not too ostentatious, true, but in any case the broad spread of the trees was very softening.

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    1. True Hels, but sometimes it is nice to see the starkness.

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  13. Beautifully documented.

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  14. Interesting post ! the town hall looks English, normal when I consider that the English sent their criminals to Australia to clean their country. I don't know anymore to which continent England belongs after the Brexit they are no Europeans anymore, lol !

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    1. Gattina, I suppose England is on its own now.

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  15. Is it a weather vane Andrew? I do like the style of the Town Hall here and as mentioned above, the trees are particularly pretty. Glad it's being used so well ✨

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    1. No Grace, not a weather vane.

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Democracy is all very well, but why give it to the people? - Audrey Forbes-Hamilton.