Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Tasmania Day One

If you live overseas you may not know much about our wonderful island state of Tasmania to the south of mainland Australia. I think it is our smallest state and has a population of a little over half a million people, compared to the not much larger Victoria with five million. It is separated from the mainland by Bass Strait, named after sea explorer George Bass. The strait seas can be treacherous at times.

It's capital city is Hobart to the south of the island on the Derwent River with the other major city being Launceston inland on the north coast on the Tamar River, where our Dyke Friend, T, lives.

Its west coast has the cleanest air in the world and is quite wet. The east coast is much drier. Hobart is usually a good bit cooler than Melbourne while Launceston is pretty close to the same weather as Melbourne.

It is a bit of joke how a map of Tasmania might look a little like a women's body part. Please do not send me photos of your Map of Tasmania. Everywhere we stayed is on the map, Launceston, Stanley, Queenstown, Hobart and Devonport.


On Friday morning at 6.30 we set off to collect our Hair Dresser Friend, A. We were cross as she apologised profusely for being nearly twenty minutes late. R and me are so punctual and it is annoying that others are not. But it really didn't matter. We queued in our car in the street leading to the ferry. Eventually we drove on. There were two cruise ships in port which probably delayed our boarding. The Spirit of Tasmania left 45 minutes late and consequently after the day sailing we arrived 45 minutes late to the port in the small town of Devonport. It took an hour plus to drive to T's house in Launceston and once there we had pizza T had prepared and a cheese board. We didn't stay up late.

Departing Melbourne. I took photos of the area where we live but I could not pick it out, not even in high resolution photos, yet we can see the ferry out in Port Phillip Bay. These are just close up local Port Melbourne photos.



We passed a large container ship in the bay.


Mount Eliza I think, on the Mornington Peninsula.


Wow, you can see the brightly coloured bathing boxes at either Safety Beach or Dromana.


A pair of tourist pleasure craft shot out from Queenscliff to check out The Spirit.



Queenscliff with the white lighthouse slightly left of centre. Line up the black lighthouse with the white light house and ships could safely navigate through the narrow Port Phillip Heads.


Far right is a Norfolk Island Pine, lit at Christmas and visible from a long way away. Far left is the Point Lonsdale Light House.


Here we go. Arriving at Devonport.


The voyage was rough at time with lots of 'drunken' people swaying side to side as they walked along the passageways. We had reserved reclining seats with elevated footrests at the rear of the ferry and we were pleased to have them. We bought a sandwich each once on board with coffee. We had a gin and tonic at some point and then a quite nice hamburger to eat for a late lunch.


While it was bright as we arrived in Devonport, by the time we reached T's place in Launceston, it was nearly dark.

27 comments:

  1. Thank you so much for taking us with you.
    I have only ever flown to Tasmania (and that not for years).
    I would be raging (internally) at A too, but am glad that her lateness made no difference. I am also chronically early - and need to lighten up.

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    1. EC, some people just seem programmed to always be late. Thanks.

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  2. it was a lovely trip

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    1. Bit rough Gosia, but we enjoyed it.

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  3. We are always punctual too, and hate people being late.
    Looking forward to your trip recount and wish we had included Tasmania when we were there.

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    1. Jackie, you really need a car there but you can cover lots of things in about ten days.

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  4. I'm always punctual. Why set a time if it's not meant to be taken seriously,and adhered to, is my belief!

    I spent a very enjoyable week in Hobart back in 1987. I was there for a tourism conference. Drove to Launceston and back again one day...the final day of my visit to the Apple Isle. I flew out from Hobart back to the mainland later that afternoon.

    The first and only parking ticket I've ever received was in Launceston!

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    1. Lee, a parking ticket is not a great memory to have of such a nice place. Pleased you enjoyed your visit regardless.

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  5. Aren't the ships a great way to travel? Approaching Devonport is a delight.

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    1. Hels, yes, the approach to Devonport is nice but I really prefer trains to ships.

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  6. I so love to cruise around. I fear it will be a very long time until we cruise again. Lovely photos!

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    1. Maribeth, I expect it will be.

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  7. That was a nice trip Andrew and all without leaving the couch :) I have heard that Tasmania has the most beautiful scenery, looking forward very much to seeing it through your eyes.

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    1. Grace, the rugged mountain ranges were amazing but I don't really have photos of them as I was driving.

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  8. I've always thought of it being a quick trip, as in 'nicking down to Tassie for a bit', but the journey actually takes several hours doesn't it? I'd like to go one day, but think I'd probably fly as it's quicker. Probably I'll never go.

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    1. River, maybe two hours flying time for you. The ferry takes either all day or all night.

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  9. Nice way to travel. Look forward to the ongoing adventure.

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  10. I just love the name "Tasmania", so happy to have a tour of the island coming up with you and R.

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    1. Thanks Strayer. It doesn't rhyme with Tanzania.

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  11. The only association I've ever had with Tasmania is the Tasmanian Devil of cartoon fame (based, I believe, on a real animal?) so it's nice to see these photos.

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    1. Jenny, I wasn't aware there was a cartoon. They aren't terrible nice animals and fight among themselves but the important to the environment and sadly many suffer from a transmissible cancer.

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  12. We have friends who when they retired a few years ago relocated from Perth to Burnie. We have been invited to go and spend some days there, so hopefully we will visit Tasmania one day. Just not in winter!

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    1. Do go Sami. It is a great place to visit.

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  13. Andrew, are you familiar with a book entitled "A Street Cat Named Bob"? It is divided between Australia--especially Tasmania--and London. I finished it last night, and enjoyed it quite well. One thing I got from it was an awfully lot of slang that I didn't know, but had to figure out from the context.

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    1. Snowy, I am not familiar with that book. Aussie slang always puzzles people. I grew up with it and I understand it and sometimes I use, depending on who's company I am keeping. Local author Judy Nunn wrote a great historical novel set in Tasmania. I really enjoyed her book. You may like it.

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    2. The author spent most of his life in England, much of it "sleeping rough" as a heroin addict, so I assume that the slang is from there. I made a list of it that I will send to you (in the next few days) via email.

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