Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Graphs

Behind my love of maps is my liking of graphs.

The first is certainly a traditional graph. Where do your electricity prices sit? Darwin and Perth apparently don't exist, but Perthites Grace and Sami are used to that. Country folk? Bad luck. You may have to click on the graph to enlarge it.


There is a Melbourne station with the name Croxton and the Croxton Park Hotel, but really it is Northcote, a suburb once a favourite of female wearers of sensible shoes, but not as much now as it has become gentrified. 

Shopkeepers and retailers always scream blue murder if any on street parking is removed, citing how many of their customers drive cars to get to their business, when if fact they grossly overestimate the numbers, certainly in inner areas of Melbourne. This pictograph? is brilliant. If you don't know, the green is by tram. Many more travel by tram and walk than local traders thought, and even the cyclists were well underestimated. Making road space for public transport, walking and cycling at the expense of cars is a no brainer.

29 comments:

  1. I really like the pictograph.
    Our local government is pushing (hard) for us to eschew the car and walk/ride/bus/tram more.
    Parking in the city is expensive and getting more so. Parking spaces are shrinking.
    Just the same, they really need to improve our public transport for it to be a happening thing. As you know I am indignant at having to walk more than a kilometre to the nearest bus stop. People with small children, those with even more mobility challenges than I do, and those who need to carry things (like groceries) on public transport agree with me. And their displeasure is reflected in the steadily diminishing numbers using public transport across most of the city.

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    1. EC, yes, the alternative has to be a good, easy and if public transport, a fast and frequent service. I think your new tram fulfills this and is popular. While you have personally be disadvantaged by the route change, I wonder what the numbers would be for those who are better off with the new, and perhaps more direct route. Many of our bus services are terribly slow as they meander around suburban streets when they should be on main and direct roads. If the ridership of your buses is dropping, and with a growing population, the government needs to be very concerned about some of the changes made.

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    2. Many of the people on the north side of town (which is the extent of the tram lines at the moment) are better off. However the people on the south side (where I live) are much worse off, and the numbers of people using public transport have dropped off dramatically. In the fullness of time if the current government is returned we too will get the tram - in another four or five years.

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  2. Fascinating pictographs.
    I was looking at my bday list and realized I missed yours. I'm so sorry. Hope it was wondrous.

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    1. Sandra, that's ok. In fact I rather wish I could miss my own birthday.

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  3. The graph is really interesting . The carbon tax took effect in 2012 and there was a downward trend for electricity prices. Then the mad monk won the election abolished the carbon tax in 2014 and since then electricity prices have taken off. The privatisation of electricity in NSW around the same time has contributed to high prices too. What really peeves is we were all promised more competition and cheaper prices.The opposite is true here in NSW.

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    1. Cheryl, I thought it was interesting and I knew you (both?) would find it so. Didn't it really kick off after the carbon tax was abolished. The opposite happened to our power prices too after our much earlier privatisation. Our state government has just done something really good, that is made the companies to offer their cheapest plans as standard. There will be quite a drop in Victorian prices. It was an interesting spike in SA in 2003-4.

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    2. Steve said the spike in SA was caused by the unexpected closure of the coal fired power station at Port Augusta.Its no longer there , soon to be a massive solar farm.

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  4. Nice pictograph. I remember borrowing Edward R Tufte's book from the library some years ago (Quantitative Display of Visual Information) and being in awe of it.

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    1. Tasker, I wonder if it harder to lie when using graphs than it is when using statistics, although graphs are based on stats I suppose.

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  5. Perth absolutely had to be included. Perth's long summers are so hot, most of our electricity went on air conditioning.

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    1. Hels, I think why some places are included is that they have stand alone systems and aren't interconnected like the eastern states and SA.

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  6. I recall in grade school we made graphs that we had to pair off with someone.
    I wonder if our up coming election will be using pictograph.
    Coffee is on

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    1. Dora, if it is, I don't want to see any pictures of #45.

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  7. My city is the tan coloured graph line. Notice the spike from 2002 to 2005? And again higher than the rest of you in 2013 and 2015. I can see that everyone else had astronomical rises too and when some pollie or other announced that prices would be falling and people would pay less per year, it worked out to about $1.61 per week, I nearly laughed my head off. The biggest part of any electric or gas bill is not the amount we use, but the supply charges and that really needs to be addressed.

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    1. River, interestingly when we signed up to the basic plan as I mentioned to Cheryl above, while the tariff was a bit higher, the supply charge was a considerable amount lower and well a truly covered the higher tariff. I may have heard that the Federal Government might do the same as Victoria did in all states. Do you know why there was such a spike in SA 2003-2004?

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  8. Is that graph the cost or the usage?

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  9. That's quite reassuring. Here in France (and still in many Asian countries) people used to travel about on Mopeds with two large panniers either side of the back wheel. Not for long journeys, but for short shopping trips it was ideal, created very little pollution, and was cheap. There should be a revival.

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    1. Cro, while I don't know if it was ever the case here, but there are a lot of mopeds around now, but they are mostly extra vehicles delivering meals to people. The way motorists drive here, it is dangerous to be on two wheels in traffic.

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  10. Well using a car is about the only option where I live. It's over 2 1/2 miles to the nearest grocery store, one way. I'd need a lot more time on my hands to walk to the store and back, and probably some sort of wagon to pull my groceries home in. But then the sidewalks, where they exist in this town, do not have the slopes to navigate a wagon up and down a curb. Feel for the folks in wheelchairs around here. It's a nice idea to walk for groceries and everything else or take transport, but that's another thing we have little of where I live. Probably much different in big cities around the world.

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    1. Strayer, yes, it is about big cities. But really there is no reason why things can't be better in mid sized cities. Your country is so different, without public transport, footpaths everywhere. It is all about car culture and parking lots.

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  11. I think Perth's summers are definitely changing Andrew, it's been a while since we had a continuous stretch of over 40C, in fact last summer I only remember one 41C day. The first few years we were here summers were definitely hotter than they are now. I read somewhere that Australia was going to swelter this summer and that Perth was going to be the coolest, who says that climate change isn't a thing!

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    1. That's interesting Grace, but it is not cool enough for me to move to Perth.

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  12. Car culture is so embedded here that only roads are cleared of snow, not the sidewalks. You read that right. It enrages me and to catch a regular bus from my Seniors Building, one would have to walk 1/2km. It is hopeless but people are getting more and more upset and forming groups. And renaming the city "Winter Unfriendly." Children walk to school in the middle of the road in winter as sidewalks are impassable.
    /rant.
    Thanks for the vent.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, that is so wrong, but at least you have sidewalks, usable or not. So many US cities don't.

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  13. I have noticed that Perth is left out of lots of things as if WA was just another country, lol.

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Democracy is all very well, but why give it to the people? - Audrey Forbes-Hamilton.