Sunday, June 30, 2019

my non permanent disability

a week a is too short time to adjust to being unnaturally left handed. i am somewhat bored without the full use of my hands. i miss writing and reading and commenting on your blogs, although i have began to leave short comments. pain has stopped unless it comes as a warning to not do something. the bandaging and sling will come off tuesday and all should be well with another week to heal before we fly to england.

aside from typing there is little i can't do except everything takes so long, like typing this. i had to ask r to fold a tablecloth and ball up some socks. i had a shower yesterday with my arm in a plastic bag but otherwise just sponge baths. my bedding needs changing but it will have to wait. r would do it if i asked but i should have thought ahead myself. i wasn't actually warned about how incapacitated i would be.

yesterday, friday, was a work luncheon for a few people with 25 years service and two with 40 years service, one being me. another with 46 years service has just retired. i wasn't going to attend after the leave business stuff up, but i am pleased i did. with the excuse that i can't type or write, my speech was very brief.

for 25 years service staff receive an engraved silver tray, it quickly tarnishes, and i didn't know until a couple of weeks ago, 40 years is literally a gold watch. someone a year ago found out they retail for 1500 dollars. it is very flashy and heavy and i haven't worn a watch since the mid nineties when i bought my first phone, coinciding with my skin allergy to cheap metal, in that case watch buckles and backs. i did wear it for a time last night to get it wound but it annoyed me. we are having dinner out tonight with my gay workmate and i will wear it to show off. my thoughts of selling it have been stymied by it being personally engraved. joking really. i am a wee bit proud of the recognition. before we travel i will resign from work. easy to type but i am so unsure if i am making the right decision.

my left hand is now aching with its unusual effort. bye bye.

ps. lovely dinner with my gay workmate. i will miss him at work, but we will remain personal friends.


22 comments:

  1. Disability is like that. Everything does take longer, is slower and harder. It is a sucky beast.
    That is a very flashy gift.
    What makes you wonder whether a letter of resignation is the right decision? And no rush to reply. I would like to know, but only when it doesn't hurt you to respond.

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    1. the security of the same job for 40 years. do i have enough money to retire. perhaps mostly, will i use my time well.

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  2. Andrew, I've just now caught up in your last couple of posts, including this one. So sorry to learn of the pain in and discomfort you're presently going through.

    Just take it steady and don't chastise yourself if things can't get done...everything can wait until the pain subsides and your hand/arm is mobile again. Do a bit of bingeing (on series)...and put your feet up. Take good care.

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  3. The retirement gift from your workplace is very impressive and really lovely. After 43 years in the NSW power industry my husband received nothing. He is sleeping much better so I think that is a gift in itself.

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  4. Wishing you a quick recovery.
    Coffee is on

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  5. That's a very nice looking watch, perhaps just wear it for special occasions. With cheaper watches you may be allergic to the nickel content as one of my kids is. I think retiring is a good idea, you've been wanting to, it's just that last permanent jump you're wary of.

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  6. My sister can't wear a watch either, they stop dead and never go again.
    My beautiful watch remains in it's velvet box, wrist got to fat for comfort. I bought cheapish pin on watches on ebay and clip them to my handbag so a quick glance and I'm right. Don't ask about the mobile phone, it's always at the bottom of the bag.

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    Replies
    1. why you never answer when i call you.

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  7. That looks like a very nice watch. I remember posting a photo on my page that inadvertently showed a tiny corner of my Rolex; I came in for quite a lot of criticism from certain quarters. I sold it not long after (nothing to do with the criticism).

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  8. Always terrible when you're not told what to expect pain and incapacity wise after a procedure.
    Wow, that watch is a great gift Andrew.
    We're having a farewell high tea for a colleague today, she's been with the clinic for 7 or 8 years and she's getting some winter pajamas, lol. Wishing you a speedy recovery.

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  9. What a lovely gift Andrew.... even if you don't always wear it. It is so nice to be recognised for your many years of service.

    Hears hoping your hand heals quickly and doesn't cause you too much more pain.

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  10. The trouble with right handed people losing the use of their right hand (or vice versa for left handers) is that life is rooted until the injury is repaired. How much more intelligent if in Prep, we all learned to use both hands.

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    Replies
    1. rooted is a good word description.

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  11. Like everyone else Andrew I'm hoping your pain subsidies quite soon. Pain can be a real killer - it can't be seen by anyone.....only felt by the receiver.
    We'll still be here when you return - refreshed and pain free. See ya then!

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  12. After 39 years of successful take offs and landings in the Airline industry, Jack got almost nothing. He received a photo of his last aircraft, that he was Captain on, and when we taxied to our gate on his last flight, there was an arch of water that we taxied through.
    Nice.
    Then they gave him a packet showing him that his health insurance increased dramatically, and if he died I would only be covered for 18 months.
    It was cold and tasteless.
    I think of all those safe flights that he participated in and it irks me.
    Ah well, believe it or not, the military, which he retired as a Captain from, has been much kinder to him in the end.

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  13. You're as stubborn as I am! "Should have thought ahead" re: changing bed.
    Hate having to do those speeches, lucky you had a good excuse.

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  14. Gosh I was too butterfly ever to have a retirement do. I don't regret it, I am at the point of life where I don't regret an effin thing because I am content where I am today.

    I wouldn't know what to do with a watch as I have an excellent sense of time.

    XO
    WWW

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  15. How wonderful you received a watch, at least they recognise a good worker.
    We take for granted what we can't use, you will be very pleased to get your hand back :)

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  16. It seems somewhat surprising that a watch is still a standard gift for retirement, given that many people don't wear one at all anymore because they use their phones instead. (I still do, though, ha ha) That is a very nice one and you're right, it's nice to be recognized with such a lovely gift.

    Hope you're taking good care of your hand.

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  17. Absolutely you should retire Andrew, you have been thinking about it for a while. Honestly you will love having all that spare time.. maybe even enough time to start jotting down ideas for the book.. when your hand has healed 😉

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Democracy is all very well, but why give it to the people? - Audrey Forbes-Hamilton.