Sunday, April 14, 2019

NZ Cruise Day 6 Gisborne

We were told in advance that there wasn't much in Gisborne. I don't know why the ship stopped there. It would be better to stop at nearby Napier with its famous Art Deco houses. Nevertheless, Gisborne was a pleasant little town. We weren't the only cruise liner in the area. It was a ferry.


It was tenders to shore, the ship boats.


The town had put on buses for ship passengers to get to the centre of town but we decided to walk and it was leisurely 20 minute stroll, past this long panel of ceramic tiles.



We first visited NZ in about 1984 and we concluded that it was better set up for tourists than Australia. Australia is pretty good now, but NZ really does it well some decades later. As we walked to the town centre, there were volunteer guides, full of information and directions and so friendly. This wasn't the only place we visited on our cruise where there were volunteer guides. They are just terrific.

Turanganui River was wide and slow.



The local cop shop, a renovated Art Deco building.


We strolled through the Sunday Market, blah, had some good coffee and then sat in the rose garden in the local park for a time. The roses were past their prime, but still blooming.






Pretty impressive chick. If you can't read her quote at the bottom, do ask. It is brilliant.


A car getting a dose of shocko electric.


I can't remember what this was about.


Duck.


There was a Maori performance of a Haka in the town square.


After being on the ship for many days among old people, it was good to see some younger skin. The Maori lad with red dreads was kind of interesting. 



Somewhere here was where we had coffee, sitting outside.



We caught the courtesy bus back to the wharf after the performance. The seas had picked up a little a lot and mein gott were we thrown around in the tender. I said to R loudly, not as bad as the Rottnest Island Ferry in West Australia. Heads around us nodded in agreement. A few minutes later I then said, I take that back. This is worse than the Rottnest Island Ferry. Again heads nodded.

Here is a short video.


Goodbye to Gisborne.



29 comments:

  1. For a town with 'not much' it looks delightful.
    LOVE that quote.

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    1. EC, wasn't the quote so good, and not one I had heard before.

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  2. I've only been to NZ one...a week spent in Christchurch to participate the TAANZ Conference back in late 1986. I loved Christchurch. Unfortunately, I had no spare time to travel elsewhere and had to refuse a generous offer to go to Queenstown and be flown by seaplane all over the southern areas as far south to Invercargil1. It was a pity I was unable to accept the invitation...it would have been wonderful.

    Have a good week, Andrew...and thank you for our "Travels with Andrew"....it's great. :)

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    1. Lee, it is a pity that you missed such a great opportunity. Somewhere during our first visit, we caught a small plane and landed on a glacier. Magical. Thanks for you kind words.

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  3. What a beautiful little spot!

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    1. Maribeth, it was, and I suppose it is good to see smaller towns and inject rather a lot of money into them.

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  4. The sea is a lovely colour.
    Not into the Haka at all, just me.

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    1. Margaret, most of the time it was that colour. Not quite the blue of Mediterranean but pretty close.

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  5. In your photo of 'red dreads'; what IS that bloke looking at on his phone!!!!!

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    1. Looks like an arm bent at the elbow.

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    2. The 'bloke' with the blue nail polish Cro? I really don't know. It doesn't look like a camera view.

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    3. River, perhaps. I've looked at other photos and it doesn't seem to be what the camera might be seeing.

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  6. Gisborne looks pretty, I read Cop Shop as Op Shop and thought ooh, how fancy for an Op Shop. The red-dreaded Maori looks a little pale, I think he needs a dose of sunshine. Perhaps he has Irish or Scottish ancestry. That tender looks too small to be out on its own, with a load of people on board too!

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    1. Ha River, my wine nearly spurted over the keyboard. I expect he is a Maori mix with Irish or Scottish. While it never really felt unsafe, I watch the crew to see if they are relaxed, we were certainly tossed about like the proverbial cork. There would have been about 50 passengers on each tender, maybe a few more. They are built for the purpose.

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  7. Very beautiful sightseeing for me ! The car you don't remember is an electric car and loads the battery ! We have more and more here. good for the "planet" and good for the wallet !

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    1. We don't have many electric cars to be charged here yet Gattina. It is a very big country though there are charging places on our major highway. I think more than half our taxis are electric hybrid, with a motor to generate electricity for the batteries if the charge is low.

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    2. I'm envisaging miles and miles of backed-up highways as cars line up for their turn at the recharger.

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  8. That quote is pretty fun, and you find the most fabulous places to hang out, small or large. Thanks for continuing to show us so many amazing things. Hugs...RO

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    1. RO, the quote was so good. Thanks for you nice words.

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  9. The ceramic tile panel done by the kids is beautiful.
    That sure was an amazing lady for her time and love her quote.

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    1. Sami, it was about 100 metres of those tiles. Amazing.

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  10. The local cop shop, the renovated Art Deco building, looks excellent. I am very partial to Deco in any case, but the connection to the water, and the choice of blue and white paint, make the building even better.

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    1. Hels, that did not occur to me, but you are quite right about the colouring.

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  11. I love the bench sculpture. And I too would have picked the rose garden to sit in and enjoy:)

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    1. Sandra, of course R had to sit next to the sculpture and drape his arm over it for a photo.

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  12. what a great quote, men to stand out of our sunshine. Well men do like that bright shiny spotlight. That does look like a rough ride back to your ship. I do love it rough on the water.

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    1. Strayer, if wasn't for some water coming a leaking window, I would have really enjoyed it.

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  13. That is a great quote by Margaret Home Sievwright. I wonder what her husband was like? I think it might take a very self-confident man to be married to a strong woman in those days. Maybe these days, too, for that matter. Societal taboos are still strong in a lot of places.

    I also wonder how many cyclists whacked their heads for that sign to have to be erected on the bridge!

    Wonderful pictures - I think I could spend a good hour looking at the tiles alone if I were there.

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  14. Jenny, it would certainly been an unconventional marriage. I'd think a few cyclists might have taken a hit. Very dangerous really but surprising that people can't see it coming. Thanks.

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Before you change something, find out why it is the way it is in the first place - unknown.