Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Our train system grew and then shrunk

BAD is in Barcelona.

How much work must have gone into this animated graphic. Just brilliant, about the expansion and shrinkage of Victorian Railways. You begin to see it start to disappear in the 1970s and increased greatly after the Lonie Report in the 80s. Some time earlier in England came the Beeching Report, which lead to the closure of many railway lines.

So, go to the above website and you may have to click animate on the left.

I don't think an animated map has been made for New South Wales, but here is a static map for Sydney folk to see when your nearest station was opened. Included is the date when each station opened. Nice work by someone.


Below is a map of Melbourne's trains system. Our naming of lines is absolute rubbish because they keep changing the name. Both London and New York do line names very well, with London having names for lines and the name doesn't change, and New York names their lines with letters such as the A Line, not terminus names as Melbourne foolishly does. Nevertheless, I think our train map is easier to follow than Sydney's. Frinstance, how do I get to Hornsby. I catch the T1 line, but T1 goes three different ways. How do I know? Not that I really want to go to Hornsby.

Ok, no map of Melbourne. It is too hard to find the right one. I've spent enough time on it. But to give you a taste of what I mean, the St Albans line became the Watergardens line as the suburban system was extended, and is now the Sunbury line. The Epping line became the South Morang line and is about to change names again. It is so silly.

Go to this link and see how Victoria's country train system expanded and then contracted. The animated map is just a brilliant piece of work. Yes, I linked to it above, but I can't be bothered editing any more. The large gap on the right is the mountainous Great Dividing Range. For travellers, the final map is not as good as it looks, as a number of lines are slow freight lines, slow because of neglect. 

20 comments:

  1. I am in awe at the animated map. Hours and hours of work, and rather a lot of skill too.

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    1. EC, just drawing a straight line on a Google map is hard work for me.

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  2. Freudian slip or are you being just too witty for words? Should you want to go to Hornby (a brand of toy train set?) in Sydney, you will have slightly better prospects if you look for Hornsby; notwithstanding the three ways of getting there. 😏

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    1. Victor, your vigilance has been tested and as usual you are alert. It was a genuine mistake.

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  3. Are these underground? Miles of abandoned tunnels makes for good science fiction later!

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    1. Mark, no they cover large distance, to the furthest point, a full day's drive at least.

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  4. It really is a great shame that these routes were removed. The silly part is so many places are now re-installing light rail because it is a great way to get around and yet we have lost so much of the old rail tracks which could have been useful.

    Too much short term thinking and not enough long term planning. We were just in Sydney last weekend and Circular Quay is a total nightmare of building works to bring the light rail there.

    Adelaide took out the trams and is now reinstalling some.. The Gold Coast has just added in a new tram network and Canberra are doing the same. But is all of this doomed to the same eventual fate? I hope not.

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    1. Snoskred, as I have written myself, what the hell happened in Sydney. The system is so overengineered. You run a bullet train on it. Canberra's is not quite as bad, and the Gold Coast shows how to do it and do it well. Fixed rail is the only real way to move the booming population we have.

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  5. Interesting watching the system grow, after a while I wasn't sure if bits were being added or removed. I still think all the train lines throughout Australia should be reinstated. Freight trains are a much more efficient way to move heavy goods than huge trucks on roads. Of course the downside would then be all those truckers out of work :(

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    1. River, yes, even with my better geographical knowledge of my state, I felt the same. This is a real problem about truck drivers out of work. If the is any kind halt in housing construction, there is going to be a lot of truck drivers out of work.

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  6. I keep meaning to comment on your comment, when I mention shuttle, it is a private bus from our condo to downtown. When the condo was built it was considered SO FAR from downtown that to entice buyers they offered a shuttle service as part of the amenities. Thankfully we still have it!

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    1. Hehe, Jackie. It is not that far, but good that you have the service. Thanks.

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  7. That was a good animation Andrew, clear and precise! I'm glad Perth's rail system is relatively simple 😉

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    1. Grace, yes that struck me too. Simple can be good, if you can get to where you need to.

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  8. I also find it silly that train lines get name changes, a waste of money too.

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    1. Sami, yes, there is that, the waste of money.

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  9. The animated map is amazing.

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    1. Sandra, I wish I was clever enough to make such a map.

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  10. It's interesting to watch the animated map. I'm a fan.

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