Thursday, January 04, 2018

Kick a copper daily

For my male readers, or even female, turn you mind back to when you were 16 or 17. Would you have kicked a policeman in the face when trying to stop a shoplifting teenager mate from being arrested?

I will guess your answer will be no. The instance above refers to northern African immigrants, or those who have parents were African immigrants. But that is not particularly relevant as we also hear of young white multi generational Australian youth doing the same. A couple of white female tourists are charged with assaulting police at a Sydney beach Christmas Day party.

I consulted with my English born better half, and he agrees that when we were young, we were frightened of policemen, and it was men then. If we behaved badly, the threat was always there that a policeman would come and take us away and do goodness knows what to us. Of course as an adult, there is some appeal in a policeman doing goodness knows what to me.

So how has the change in society come about? Perhaps in summary, little respect for authority, leading to those in authority to not have authority any more.

Is there any validity in saying, they need a good kick up the arse? The police were just the people to do that, and they did. Is that where the fear and respect came from? They were never supposed to do that, but a blind eye was turned. Of course given the power of assault being ignored, it led to abuse of power.

One possible reason I have touched on before. If people are not picked up by police for minor matters, they will lose respect for laws and the enforcement of them.

Is it that institutions, including police, around the world have been exposed as being very corrupt in the twentieth century?

Ok, generally police no longer give an arse kicking to a badly behaving youth, but there are other things to fear from getting involved with police, such as being locked up for an extended period, the shame, the pointlessness, the criminal record, the fact that you are a marked person by police. I just do not understand why there is no fear of the police, the courts and the legal system. Is it that the courts are too lenient? Many people say yes, but if they sit in on a trial, they say no. The judgement and sentence were fair.

Oh well, hopefully me pontificating from my ivory concrete tower will not experience some of the terrible crimes in Melbourne that have been perpetrated on those similar to me, very very normal people.

Later edit: It seems like the cop kicking kid has breached many orders, including bail and parole and a criminal history and will now be remanded in custody.


30 comments:

  1. Yes. We might have run from the police but would never, ever have assaulted them.
    Authority has diminished everywhere it seems.

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    1. I think fear of, or loathing for the police might have been a very working class thing. I always believed that police were there to serve us, to protect us from theft or assault or drunk drivers.

      Until the late 1960s :( Remember the high-ranking police masterminding a bribery racket, getting thug-money from important Collins Street doctors in a conspiracy against women needing contraception, abortion and sterilisation?

      I wonder how many policemen were set up for life financially.

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    2. EC, I suppose it was the way I was brought up, but I used to even feel intimidated by those who stood at the gates at railway stations checking tickets.

      Hels, I don't remember any loathing, just respect and some fear. While some did get caught, I expect there were many from the top down who did not.

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  2. We must be the same age...... I was scared of cops, teachers and hell.... my parents! LOL

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    1. Lady J, that is how it was for me. Parents too, but not quite as much.

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  3. The respect by so many for the Force has now gone.
    I'm was a Policeman's daughter.
    Respect at home usually brings respect in the street.

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    1. Margaret, it usually goes back to upbringing, doesn't it.

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  4. Not only do younger people not fear of the police, they also hardly ever see one. I haven't seen a Gendarme for years; maybe they know I'm a good boy!

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    1. Cro, and the Gendarmes don't have you English police record. We saw a lot more on the street out of the city centres in England, actually walking the beat.

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    2. Cro, come to Adelaide, we have them walking around the city now, in pairs mostly, but on days when there is known to be trouble in certain streets, they go in threes.

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  5. I still respect the police which is a product of being a nurse for 34 years. Police and nurses historically have worked together in many scenarios

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    1. And ambulance crew too, I should think John.

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  6. My comment has vanished ?????

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  7. I remember the days when policemen, in pairs "walked the beat" not only in the main part of town, but along the beach road and in the suburbs too, even walking through the parks. Of course Port Pirie wasn't very big then, and most of the coppers knew everyone and if so-and-so was getting up to a bit of mischief, the coppers would haul him home by the collar (leading to the expression 'collared') and tell his parents what he was up to.
    These days certainly are different. I don't fear policemen, never did, but I do respect the law and don't do the sorts of things that would land me in jail.

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    1. River, unlike in England and Europe and New York at least, here you don't see them walking the streets like they do in those places. Yes, small town police were in an interesting and at times difficult situation, often being members of sports teams and social clubs. When they went on holidays, an outsider took over and did a lot of 'cleaning up'.

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    2. They walk the streets here in Adelaide, started a couple of years ago.

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  8. We still have police walking/cycling the best in Perth and I think they do that 'getting to know' the people on their stretch. As you know Andrew, Northridge can be a bit dodgy at night so there's a bigger police presence in spots like that. Thugs and troublemakers definitely need more 'attention'.

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    1. Grace, while they do in the centre of our city, you rarely see them outside on foot. Good to hear that Northbridge is well monitored.

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  9. Speaking of people having no respect for authority anymore....I got a job at a middle school this year, and I've been stunned at how 13 and 14 year old kids treat their teachers these days. Zero respect. I'd have feared for my life once my parents got ahold of me if I had acted like these kids back when I was growing up!

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    1. Jennifer, and it comes from the way they are brought up, it seems. Teachers need extra skills now to deal with such behaviour. I don't envy them.

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  10. Spare the Rod and Spoil the Child. then the Do gooders changed the rules around the Sixties. The most prominent object on the teachers desk during my schooldays was the Cane, a constant reminder of pain and suffering caused mainly by conflicting with the opinions of one's betters.

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    1. Vest, certainly in primary school that threat was there, but by the time I began secondary school in 1969, it had disappeared.

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  11. I was brought up to respect my elders irrespective of their position in society, so I certainly had and still have great respect for teachers, medical staff and policemen who have to deal with all sorts of people. I have noticed that the youth of today has no respect for teachers or police. A very sad situation.

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    1. Sami, in my job I come in contact with all stratas and I will say respect towards authority is generally maintained by the richer middle class kids (don't want any police record) and the $20 smashed avocado eating hipsters. However, generally you are correct.

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  12. I start to think that it is a new fashion to attack and insult policemen ! It happens here in Belgium and in Germany too. I was never afraid of a policeman or teacher, because my grandma had told me to never fear a man uniform or not. And as I behaved normal I never had any problems either. My son had, because he smoked grass, and when the police came I told them that it is not true, and they could check his room and the whole house if they wanted. They had a quick look in his room and went away smiling. I didn't smile when later I was told that the beautiful plants my son had given to me to water them while he was on holidays were Canabis plants ! And the whole house smelled. I didn't know and apparently the policemen neither, ! Only the cats loved the smell of the plants !

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    1. Gattina, that is hilarious about your son and the plants he gave you to water. I expect Belgian, German and Netherlands police are not too bothered to enforce minor matters related to cannabis. It is a rather sweet smell, for sure.

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    2. I'm reminded of the day I opened the shed door to find a large pot with a six feet tall marijuana plant in there. When my son arrived home I told him if it wasn't gone by morning, I'd be calling the police. Sure enough, it disappeared overnight. In hindsight, maybe I should have called the police.

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  13. I am terrified of the police, having once been in the mental system, the way I was treated by most police people would be criminal if I'd done the same thing to others. It left me fearful of them, suspicious, untrusting. Also they harassed me mercilessly in Corvallis when I lived there when I was trapping cats to help. Not so here, in Albany. Merely 12 miles from Corvallis but completely different police mentality I've encountered here. I've been stopped by police, when someone sees a car out in the middle of nowhere middle of the night (me, trapping) and when I tell them what I'm doing, some have even said "thank you". But I'm still scared of them.

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    1. Yeah, I know Strayer. It is weird how different it can be in two cities so close by. Are your police state police or local town police? I've heard towns elect Sheriffs who control the police.

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Democracy is all very well, but why give it to the people? - Audrey Forbes-Hamilton.