Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Clearing the rubbish from the beach who leave the rubbish

Late post today, and a big one to come tomorrow, if I finish it.

The St Kilda foreshore was in a sad and sorry state this Boxing Day morning. It was trashed by around 5,000 people, mostly backpackers, who gathered together Christmas afternoon and into the evening. At 8pm the City of Port Phillip alcohol ban in public spaces kicked in and was just ignored. By 8pm it was too late to enforce the ban. Many by then would have already been 'well oiled'. Of course the ban should have applied earlier, but I expect it didn't to allow Christmas picnickers to have a drink. Because they are backpackers, they don't have families here to visit with on Christmas Day and it is natural that they would gather together on a very pleasant day at the beach. Photos from The Age.


The worst thing was the broken glass that has been embedded into the grass. The price of the clean up will be about $15,000, paid for by the City of Port Phillip ratepayers, two of which are us!


But really, there is no point in making new laws when it is simply a matter of enforcing existing laws. Admitted the number were smaller, but the police cleared a Sydney beach of drinking party goes.

21 comments:

  1. I hate rubbish left in public. Your photos look like a dump :(

    Yesterday I asked some young men at my coffee shop to pick up newspapers that had flown all over the street in the wind. Put them right into bin, fellas, or take them inside the coffee shop away from the wind!!!!

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    1. Hels, that is your beloved St Kilda foreshore that is that dump. Well done you for speaking up. Now what to say to the ravens that empty the contents of bins onto the streets?

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  2. I expect some of the party-goers wore some of that glass too.
    You are right. If the law is in place - enforce it. Early.

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  3. What a mess. There are trashers everywhere. In Oregon, some trails are now closed because people using them trashed them and some campgrounds and swimming holes now do not allow alcohol because people get drunk, trash the area, get into fights, etc. People behave like toddlers in public places so often. Spring break, last year, or was it two years back, big public outcry over University of Oregon students, from Eugene, no less, a so called Green city and proud of it, who left mounds and mounds of trash at Lake Shasta like spoiled brats who need mommy to clean up for them and since she wasn't along, taxpayers had to foot the bill and clean up after them.

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    1. Strayer, your examples are salient and that is why there needs to be enforceable rules and regulations. If a street is spotless, it would be rare for anyone to drop rubbish. If the street is rubbish strewn, everyone will drop rubbish. Our national parks never have rubbish bins. Your rubbish is your problem. Group behaviour when you are talking about hundreds or thousands becomes problematic and I don't feel too harshly about the backpackers who gathered together because they has no mummy and daddy to go to on Christmas Day. They need to be catered for, and it would cheaper to cater than clean up.

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  4. What has occurred on Melbourne's St. Kilda beach is an absolute, disgusting disgrace! This is one of the few times that words fail me!!! But not quite, obviously!

    I hope those ignorant clowns who left their mess behind take a good look at it today...and take a very close look at themselves. You can bet your bottom dollar the wastes-of-space weren't there cleaning up their waste from that space. They should be banned from the area, and other such areas forever more!!!!!!

    It's not the rubbish that needs recycling...but the rubbish people who don't know how to discard their rubbish correctly!!! Disgusting, worthless clowns! And if my words and descriptions offend...so be it. People like that disgust and anger me.

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    1. Totally agree Lee, but I think that there does need to be some formally organised Christmas Day thing for the backpacker kiddies who are away from family and working hard here in Melbourne. Sydney had to deal with Bondi Beach New Year's Eve backpacker bacchanalia, and it did, I think by locking them in a big cage, haha. I think it is going to have to be an organised event here in the City of Port Phillip, which will hopefully cost less than this year's clean up bill.

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    2. Oh yes, I suspect there was some backpacker navel gazing the following day.

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    3. For heaven's sake! How long do these idiots need hand-holding?! There are no excuses...they're idiots...black and white; pure and simple!!

      Why do others have to be responsible for cleaning up after their bad behaviour?

      Sure...lock them up in a big cage and put fire hoses on them!!!

      The clowns who make such messes and make a disgrace of themselves need to formally organise themselves...and clean up after themselves...and take a good, long, hard look in the mirror!

      They get no sympathy from me....

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    4. Lee, I don't think anyone has sympathy for them and their behaviour, but we have to practical about 5,000 people with nowhere special to go on Christmas Day if such bad behaviour is to be prevented in the future.

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  5. I saw that mess on the news tonight and was horrified. My first thought, as always, is "how dare they, would they do this in their own home?"
    I hope all the broken glass gets found and removed and I hope that next year the ban on alcohol extends to the whole day on beaches and other public places.
    I also hope those involved are suitably ashamed. If they could be identified, they should be made to help with the clean up, but at 5000 people that's probably impossible.

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    1. River, indeed how dare they and why not clear up? For a start the council workers arrived at 5am to clean up. Very few would have been awake at that time. Yes, the alcohol ban needs to be in place earlier. If the local council had any knowledge that this would happen, they would have put rubbish and toilet facilities in place, as they do for other events. But it was not an event, it was just a gathering of people who grew in large numbers. The worst of the rubbish would have been removed by 9am. The embedded glass has taken longer. You can stop people drinking in public, if there is enforcement, but you can't stop people gathering in a public space.

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  6. We saw this mess on our news - it's such a shame that these people left such a mess to be cleaned and to be paid for by the ratepayers. I really don't think if there were more garbage bins in place there would have been enough for all those people.

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    1. Margaret, City of Port Phillip is very experienced at catering for large events and it would have been fine if they knew in advance, but it was just so impromptu.

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  7. I imagine this mess was left behind by young people; they should be bloody ashamed of themselves.

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    1. Cro, I expect many are. They would be mostly English and Irish backpackers, who serve us in our cafes, ride on our public transport and tour Australia. Individually, they are lovely. In a group of 5,000 far away from family on Christmas Day with everything shut, collectively they weren't.

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  8. I watched this on the news, and wondered if these young people don't think that someone has to pay for that cleaning up of their rubbish! The police should have made them do it themselves before ushering them out the beach!

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    1. Sami, young people don't seem to at all think about cause and effect. Christmas Day is usually reasonably quiet for police. I expect the numbers of cops were just not there to enforce. They will be next year.

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  9. I saw references to both disturbances on the news from Brisbane and the images were disgusting.

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    1. Victor, lacking parents here to pick up after them.

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Before you change something, find out why it is the way it is in the first place - unknown.