Sunday, September 03, 2017

My Store Myer

The subject line was the store's advertising slogan a few years ago. Myer is a large department store based in Melbourne and has stores in other regional cities and states, but it is very much a Victorian (state based) company, now a public company listed on the stock exchange. We like Myer or as it was known in my younger years, Myers, and we have spent many a dollar at the store and rarely regretted any money spent.

Myer is promoting a display at the moment, so I went to have a look. It is on the sixth floor, where there are a lot of apples and other technology. It had less on display than I thought it would, but it was interesting enough and I certainly connected with much of what was on display. I had little chat with a very old woman, like about 90, who was looking at the display with great interest.

The blurb.


We had one of these machines on a shelf in our kitchen in Waverley Road in the 1980s. We mostly used it to listen to AM Radio. I don't remember the Garfield Telephone but I do remember car service stations toys for kiddies. I may have even had one.


You women of a certain age, did you have an Glomesh purse or handbag? If you still have them and are using them, do no admit it. I never really liked Ken Done designs but he was very popular in Japan and with visitors to Australia from Japan. I remember Frij bags, but we never owned on.


This photo is a real tick. We had the Sunbeam electric frypan, well R did. By the time I came along, it was warped and no good for frying but great for boiling smoked cod. Yes, we had a Breville Toaster and I remember so many women having and using a curling wand.


A bit before my time but Mother's first washing machine was a Stampco and was similar to this, except it would spin, rather than having a mangle.


Long did we debate about buying a Commodore 64 computer in the 80s. I expect we didn't because we could not really see a use for it. I think we made the right decision.


In my wardrobe and in R's, you will respectively find one of these Sharp organisers. The records I kept on mine were a list. I also kept work times. It had a back up battery to save the data if the main battery went flat. Eventually the back up battery went flat and all data was lost, but not missed. Ugly cordless phones. So much nicer now. R used to occasionally use a fax machine at work. It is one piece of technology that I just skipped.


Oh yes, I had one of those waistcoats. And yes, a hyper colour tee shirt that changed colour depending on your body heat. They were always so bright at the armpits.


We didn't but a friend did have a Panasonic Genius microwave. When he first bought it, he would gather an audience to sit around watching it boil a cup of water to make coffee. I had a few Sony Walkmans, perhaps three.


I didn't have a Handycam, but a friend lent me one to record things in Thailand in late 1980s. I filmed the lady boy show at Alcazar and  decided that I missed a lot of the show because I was busy recording it. No more video recording for me. Our phones can now make much better recordings than this old clunker. Yeppers, more than one pair of Le Specs did I own.


Step Mother used to use one of these to set her hair if she wasn't wearing her Liza Minnelli wig. It was rather noisy. It also had a fingernail drying warm air outlet.


I learned to type on one of these, in my case a Hanimex portable.


My step brother had a reel to reel. I didn't but I used to buy Scotch brand cassette tapes. They were the best, but TDK tapes were pretty good too. Is the TDK tv ad on Youtube? I hope so. "TDK does amazing things for your system".


Etch A Sketch, I had one and even Little Jo had one. So trans generational. View Master, cutting edge technology in the sixties, with stereophonic views. That particular Sunbeam toaster was owned by Mother for about three decades. I asked her about it and I learnt that my paternal brain damaged Uncle bought it for her and he paid £15 some time in the sixties. It never abruptly popped up the toast, but gently and stylishly raised the toast. I think it only lasted about three decades.


A bit like Grandmother's vacuum cleaner. God, hers was noisy.


Our first family television in about 1965 was an AWA Deep Image. It was bit more modern than this model, in fact it was very stylishly modern. That was back in the days when Australia used to make things.


I did not spend that much time in our garage in Waverley Road but what time I did spend was spent in the company of a bakelite radio tuned to 3LO. It was left by a former owner. I bought new valves for it and it was fine. Yes, I made bad Meccano models like this one in my youth. I inherited my maternal grandfather's Remington electric razor. You had to flick a wheel to kickstart it. Paper bags from Myers to celebrate the crowning of our queen. Envelopes containing your Melbourne Olympics tickets in Melbourne, 1956. I never cared for Bill Haley, comets or otherwise.


A late version of a Coolgardie safe, perhaps once draped in wet hessian to keep food cool and last for longer than one day in the fierce Australian heat. No, that is not right. I remember one in a shed at home or at my grandparents. I can't remember what it was for? Bread? Anyone? I think I may have had one of these metal aeroplanes and I had a book similar to the one pictured.


I can only remember Singer treadle sewing machines. Perhaps Victor took particular notice of Victor sewing machines.


Not so interesting to me, but maybe of interest to some.



Drug addict clothing, which reminds me of shell suits, a most ghastly outfit seen mostly being worn by female American tourists in Australia in the 90s.


I think this was the first Apple computer with the guts contained in behind the screen, rather than in a separate tower.


I am not so interested in female fashion, but I I like this outfit.


Tesla cars are rather topical. Myer had one on display. I saw the front doors open electrically, the rear doors rise electrically, and the boot lid rising electrically is nothing new. Did you know that in Japan they drive on the left as we do, and the taxi rear door opens electrically for you to get into the cab and then closes itself once you are in. Well, you might remember that if you were a blog reader of mine back in 2010.

Why does Japan drive on the left when other Asian countries don't and left hand driving is pretty well only found in British Commonwealth countries and former colonies. The answer is here, with a decent little world map to show which side of the road people drive on.


When travelling six storeys, I prefer the lift over escalators.


Later at Domayne, pineapple and cockatoos. Somehow I doubt Snoskred will rush out to buy this pineapple to add to her collection.

42 comments:

  1. Lots of familiar sights here. No glomesh purse - though my mother had one. No curling iron here either. Our first washing machine was a twin-tub. Which I don't remember fondly. And our current microwave is a Panasonic Genius.

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    1. EC, while labour intensive, those Hoover twin tubs (if that is what is was) were really good. The spin was a one million revolutions per minute and the clothes almost dry when they came out of the spinner. I had no idea Pan...hang on. Panasonic is still around? Or maybe your microwave is really really old.

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    2. I had a Hoover twin tub that saw me through four babies worth of nappies, excellent machine and when the drive belt wore out (mine didn't ever) it could be easily replaced with the elastic band top off a pair of panty hose.

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    3. Sorry River, but I just had a mental image of you taking off your panty hose to repair a washing machine. The Hoover twin tubs were brilliant, but a little labour intensive.

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  2. For 14 years I worked for The Kolotex Group of Companies, as secretary to the Queensland Manager. I was also Office Manager and State Sales Coordinator. I've written about this period in my life often on my blog.

    The Kolotex Group of Companies consisted of Kolotex Hosier, Glo International (Glomesh products), Rogtex womenswear and menswear. In the early 70s we contracted well-known Aussie designer, Carla Zampatti to design a range of womenswear for our Rogtex division.

    They were great years. I very much enjoyed my years working for the company.

    Both Myers and David Jones were major clients/customers of ours, of course.

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    1. Lee, do I remember a brand of panty hose called Kolotex? So do you have a 'sample' Glomesh purse put away somewhere? There was a Carla Zampatti designed car...maybe a very small Toyota. Of course it was only the styling of the car trim. I note you called it Myers.

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    2. I have no idea if you remember Kolotex Pantihose, Andrew. :)

      We were the only hosiery manufacturers who had their factory and offices based in Sydney (in the suburb of Leichhardt)...all others were in Melbourne.

      I've always called Myers..."Myers", Andrew.

      And, no...I don't have a Glomesh purse, handbag, compact case, cigarette case or any other Glomesh producst hidden away.

      Sorry about the typo I've just noticed I made in my response above..."Hosiery"....not "Hosier"!!

      We, in our Brisbane office created the first pantyhose (pantihose) TV commercial to be shown in Australia. It featured Annette Allison, who went onto further fame in Melbourne years later. Annette at one stage was also engaged to Derryn Hinch, when they were both working in Hong Kong. We produced the commercial up at the Channel 9 Mount Coot-tha television studios.

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    3. Was Kolotex the maker of the Razzamattazz panty hose that had the advertisemnets where men drove their cars/bike up into trucks etc because they were looking at women's legs? They were fun ads.

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    4. Lee, yes, there were panty hose called Kolotex, as you comment described. Ha, I had forgotten about the cigarette case. I remember Allison well, but it had slipped my mind that she was engaged to Hinchy. I went to Mount Coo-tha one night in about 1977 and the views over Brisbane were amazing.

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  3. I still call it Myers :)
    And yes, glomesh handbags were de rigueur for weddings etc. Mine still looks lovely.

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    1. Hels, as the Coodabeens say, bring them back.

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  4. Myers it is (always was wasn't it??). There might even be an old Myers card lurking in a drawer.

    What I do have lurking in a drawer is - yes you guessed it - a very nice smallish carry on your wrist gold coloured Glomesh purse. Complete with box! ~ Cathy

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    1. Cathy, you can't buy anything in Myer now without being pestered about your Myer One card. Actually, we had received some benefit from outs. A wrist Glomesh purse! How practical for everything, well your lipstick perhaps.

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  5. This is was a fun post. Thank you

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  6. I admit to using a Ken Done mouse-pad. It illustrates Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Opera House (of course), and was brought back from Oz for me by my wife about 20 years ago. It's about time I bought myself a new one; it's falling to bits!

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    1. Cro, in good condition, I reckon it would be worth a few bob, but obviously it isn't in good condition. I wouldn't mind a photo of it. I don't really hate Ken Done.

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  7. So many memories here! I had one of those hairdryers, but never set my hair on rollers, so it was pretty much a useless Christmas gift and very noisy. I used it once and eventually gave it away. We had the Sunbeam electric frypan and used it almost every day, for years. It made great fried rice.
    In my opinion TDK were the best tapes and that's all we ever bought unless they weren't available and then we bought Sony or waited until a new supply of TDK was available.
    I'm amazed at a toaster lasting three decades, surely that's a record.

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    1. River, how good was meat fried in fat in the electric frypan! Yes, Sony were good too. I remember how on Sunday mornings I would cassette tape blowing around from car cassette players that tangled up tapes. Not TDK though, I should think. No, I think those toasters did really last. The toilet light bulb in my grandparent's house was still working when the house was sold about 1977, having being installed when the house was new in 1958.

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    2. There's a giant lightbulb somewhere that has been burning non stop since the day it was installed in one of the places that make light bulbs. I read about it in a newspaper article called Planned Obsolescence (which I failed to keep and I'm not rummaging through the bin for it) where several large companies got together and decided that items like light bulbs etc should be made purposely to last only 6 months so people would have to buy, buy, buy and stimulate the economy.

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  8. My hair dryer went out for hard rubbish collection last year. the Hoover twin tub was great for baby nappies, as you said came out nearly dry. The Sunbeam toaster lasted 30 years with one repair at the Sunbeam shop at chadstone. I still use my Sony Walkman and those tapes were the best. Going on the hard rubbish this year is the Brother electric typewriter because it would cost more to have the letter wheel fixed. I'll have a go at fixing it myself and you know how that's going to turn out. Mind you if anyone has a handyman husband who loves taking electric things apart and you'd like to take it, let me know.

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    1. Jah Teh, what happened to the brand Brother? Electric typewriter huh....I was so poor that I had to hit my manual typewriter keys with wooden mallet to make it work. I am the handy person around here, not R, and stop trying to get your hands on him.

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  9. It was a "meat" safe, Andrew. We had one in our kitchen, sans the hanging wet hessian of course, although I am just old enough to remember having an ice chest, and the man making regular deliveries of huge chunks of ice on his shoulder, before we bought our first Kelvinator fridge.
    I remember Mum telling us the meat safe used to sit under a shady tree to keep the meat cool enough for that night's dinner (I presume?).

    Yes, I had a Glomesh bag, but kept catching dresses on it, as I recall.

    I loved the whole post mate!

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    1. Thank you Rozzie. Of course it was a meat safe, and fly proof. Now people panic if meat is out of refrigeration for 10 minutes. My grandfather's caravan had an ice chest and when on holidays, we had ice delivered. So quaint. Yes, I had forgotten about the catching on dresses thing with Glomesh. Thank you.

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  10. Anonymous3:59 pm

    Having shopped at MYER since the 1960s it was always Myer in our family

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    1. Anon, was that in Melbourne where it was absolutely known only as Myers?

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  11. Re Myers... It was always called Myers (Myer's?) up here in Qld until a few years back. I remember an official announcement by them that it was to be called "Myer" from then on, but most of us oldies still call it Myers.

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    1. Rozzie, yes, it should have properly been Myer's, for Myer's department store or something like that. I really don't think anyone here in Melbourne now calls it Myers.

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  12. I remember a number of those items from my childhood. Not from Myers of course but just the same designs especially the singer sewing machine. My very first one was a treadle that was converted to electric. How modern was that!

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    1. Marie, you are a sewer too? (Now I can see a problem with that word sewer) So you sewed then, Marie? I can't remember the brand we had, and my mother never sewed, but we used to play with the treadle machine. We would get it to the highest speed we could. Imagine the damage we could have done to our fingers with that high speed spinning wheel!

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  13. There is a distinct lack of sparkly when it comes to that pineapple, Andrew. :) I'm still keeping an eye on the copper ones at Pillowtalk, except now it is virtually impossible to get to the store as Service NSW has moved into that complex and now I can't ever get a park there. So it looks like bad news for my love story with the copper pineapple. I may in the end be forced to get a plain white one instead! ;)

    Hmm.. I could try online shopping for my pineapple, but I want to inspect it before I buy to make sure it is perfect. No chips, no dents, no scratches. Pineapple perfection!

    I have noticed pineapples are on the wane, apparently overtaken by artichokes in recent times. I will not be buying any artichokes. They just don't do it for me. :)

    I did not have any glomesh BUT I will tell you, there is a range of new mesh bags at TVSN. It is a brand called Smoulder and they have a gorgeous "multi" colour which is like a muted rainbow. Perhaps fashion has completed the circle. But I'm not paying $179 for a handbag of any kind. Even a very pretty one. :)

    I would pay $179 for a pineapple, but it would have to be completely covered in Swarovski crystals for that kind of money!

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    1. PS here is the Smolder bag - it does not have a U, apparently. My bad! :)

      https://www.itvsn.com.au/include/oecgi2.php/product?product=521652&category=F2123

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    2. Snoskred, I agree. Artichokes are very boring. Thanks for the Smolder info. I can bring it into to conversation with my nieces and they will think I am terribly hip and in touch with modern fashion. Nah, probably not. Swarovski crystal covered pineapple sounds desirable to me even.

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  14. No Glowmesh for me Andrew but my mum did have one of those hair dryers ☺ What a fab look into the past!
    I do remember Blue Poles, I'm a fan of the abstract painting but Blue Poles was seriously not worth 350 million, I'm not sure any painting is worth that!

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    1. Grace, I was inclined to think the same as you about Blue Poles, until I saw it. It is a stunning work. But then yes, nothing is worth that amount of money.

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  15. What a fabulous display! Will admit our first computer was a Commodore 64! I recognize most items here. Got my finger caught in my mother's ringer washer. Had a portable typewriter as a teenager.

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    1. Jackie, that C 64 looks a bit newer than the one we considered which had a tape drive. R too had his hand caught in a mangle.

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  16. Ah, the Commadore 64, very famous, and I tried one once. I still have a Sony Walkman. Etch a sketch, they're coming around again and being sold in the states once again, at least I saw one in a store recently. I always used TDK tapes too.

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    1. Strayer, a case I think of 'we of a certain age'. I don't think Etch a Sketch ever disappeared.

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  17. aaah the memories. Looks like a good display of old timey stuff!

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    1. Fen, I detect a little superioress in your comment. You are not that young.

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    2. this is very true!!

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