Monday, July 31, 2017

Sikh v. Christian

I just love this story. A Sikh man wants his son to go to a Christian school because if offers a good education. The Christian school will happily accept the Sikh lad, as long as he does not wear his child turban to school. I did not vomit, as the term Christian values was not used. But I am highly amused by this cultural and or religious clash.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-07-24/sikh-family-challenge-christian-schools-turban-ban/8737716

I can't help but think when I look at what tax I pay, that some of it is going to towards subsidising these nonsense religious schools, Moslem, Jewish, Christians, and maybe there are Hindu, Sikh and Buddhist schools there too.

Every Australian child should get a good education, funded by society, that is taxpayers. No taxpayer should have to pay for crank religious education, but we do!

I think that might make me a bigot. So be it. No, I just googled bigot definitions and I am not a bigot. I just don't want my taxes going towards supernatural beliefs.  Children will learn plenty about religion in history, geography, media studies, law, human rights and economics. Yes, rather a lot in economics.

33 comments:

  1. Andrew lack of tplerance is the problem in the contemporary world.

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    1. The biggest problem, Gosia.

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  2. It always irritates me the amount that we as taxpayers contribute to 'private' schools. Publically funded private schools.

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  3. Anonymous8:11 am

    So what will the father do when the boy has to study the Christian religion? Demand he be exempted from that because its against his beliefs. Ridiculous. But then so is the school's policy of 'we don't want children standing out as different.' Just another brick in the all. - Ian

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    1. Indeed, Ian, what would happen then. It should be about accepting differences, not not having differences stand out.

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    2. I don't think religion is studied in schools these days. My grandson went to a private Catholic high school, and there was a mass held every week (or every morning), but if the student wasn't Catholic, he didn't have to attend, so S didn't, and there was no mention of religious instruction at all.

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    3. River, religion should be studied. It is such an important part of our lives and our history. I just say, don't believe in it. Catholic schools have adapted to modern times without making a song and dance about it. Sister teaches in a posh private Catholic boys school and everyone there knows she is gay and has a female partner and a child born out of wedlock. Mind, it is something she is very circumspect about at school, as I am at my work now.

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  4. I'm a bigot too dear A.
    The school is clearly NOT following the perceived 'christian' principle of tolerance love and acceptance - now 'hands up' all who are not surprised.
    That's unanimous then.
    bloody hypocrites, I despise them all. all cults.
    ones who have to wear turbans - why ever FFS, and the ones who reject the turbans, the ones who won't eat meat on fridays and the one which thinks eating pig is worse than eating lamb or beef or poor tortured chickens, and don't get me started on 'not turning a lightswitch on because it is Friday night'. what the hell does it matter. the poor little kid just needs food and shelter from his parents.

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  5. Every child in the nation should receive the same tax-funded monetary allowance, whether he/she studies in a government school or in a private school. If parents elect to send the child to a private school run by the church or any other organisation, then the extra money has to come from the parents or the church, but NOT from tax payers.

    It makes me so angry that rich or religious schools receive far more money per child from the tax base than do government schools.

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    1. Hi
      People who send their children to private schools also pay tax.
      So they pay taxes and ALSO school fees. In effect the taxpaying private school parents are subsidising state school students.
      This is an economic statement only, not a religious one.
      Cheers Marie

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    2. Forgot to say Hels statement regarding private school students receiving more funds per head than state school students applies only to Commonwealth funding. The State funding is the MAIN funding and state school students receive much more per head than do private school students cheers Marie (again)

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    3. Hels, that has been mooted at various times and may work well enough however I can't get past the state providing education for all. If someone wants their child privately educated, fine, but they pay for it.

      Marie, yes I am aware of the State/Commonwealth funding, but as above, people pay their taxes and their children are entitled to a state education. No need for private schools and if someone sees the need, then they pay for it. Yes, of course there are now not enough state places to cope, but that can be changed over time. As Ann above pointed out to me once, parents donate large amounts of tax deductible money to private school building funds. The poorest taxpayer in the land is funding beautiful facilities at posh private schools.

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    4. Marie is right. Parents who send children to private schools pay TWICE. They are never refunded for their contribution to the state system.

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    5. Cro Magnon: I really don't see that as being a problem. It is their choice to pay the private school fees, and that choice is at least partially supported by the government. As a childless person I contribute to both the state and the private system. And receive no refunds. Neither do I expect them.

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    6. I don't see it as a problem either. It's a choice one makes.

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    7. Cro, they do indeed, but why do parents feel the need to pay twice? That is privately educate their children. The state provides an education for all children. What is the need for the taxpayer to fund another, often religious based education system?

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  6. I agree, Andrew...in what you've written.

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  7. And I'm not entering into the argument one way or another because I have conflicting thoughts running through my brain.

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    1. Cathy, I have an unfinished post written about why I think Little Jo needs to go to a private school. I am very conflicted too.

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  8. I was educated at one of the world's oldest schools (officially founded in 960 AD, but probably much older), which was semi-connected to one of England's great cathedrals. We had to attend a cathedral service once a day, plus twice on Sundays.

    However, I totally agree with you about religious schools as such. Religious indoctrination of children, to me, is no less than abuse. We moan about Islamic schools, but Christian schools are as bad.

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    1. So agree, Cro. Any religious education needs to be completely separated from general education, which as I said in the post, can be included generally in general education, but not religion specific.

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  9. What pisses me off the most about this is that here in Australia (it may well differ in other countries) the government subsidises private schools MORE per student than they do public schools. And that is just plain not fair.

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    1. Rozzie, while I love your response and that it how most people think, it is not literally true. I can't rant without speaking the truth. If you combine State funding with Federal funding of schools, government school students get more. But why spoil my and your argument with minor facts. I expect it is much the same in many countries. It is rare for Australia to anything original.

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  10. What the heck difference does it make if the child wears a turban or not? Is it going to make him less academic if he wears it? Will he be less able to cope if he wears it? Perhaps that father should shop around and find a school with a good academic reputation that WILL take his son.
    I don't think there is anything in school regulations that say he can't wear a turban. I see girls here in Adelaide going to schools, primary and high schools with the head covering scarf thing.

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    1. River, of course. State funded schools accept all, wearing a turban or a veil and fortunately former PM John Howard's Christian religious education in schools has been ditched by schools. As I am sure you aware, all religions preach similar kindness and caring messages in their religions. Only religious extremists pick bits from old books to justify their extreme actions.

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  11. That's the thing though Andrew, once that tax money leaves your pay you have no say in where it goes unfortunately!

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  12. Do away with all religious schools and schooling. Let the children choose if they want religion in their life when they are an adult. Stop the brain washing.

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    1. Allan, no argument at all from me.

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