Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Mine is bigger than yours

I have been comparing Victor's nearby erection with my own. The original front and rooms of Albert Park Manor are being kept but the rear was demolished. There are demolition photos and information about its former purpose back here. The graffiti on the hoardings has since been painted over.


A crane was needed to put a crane in place.



A well paid job, I should hope.



Grace has now left the room.


See the bloke out towards the end.


Counterweights need to be added.


Pretty well complete now. I have never taken too much notice of cranes and I assumed, without thinking about it, cables ran to the end bit, around a pulley and then down to the ground to pick up and lift. Not so these smaller cranes. About half was along the horizontal blue bit (sorry about the tech jargon) is a thingie with pulleys. It can slide back and forth and that is what does the lifting from down below. I guess it is controlled but when the crane is without an operator, he moves itself around according to wind direction. At times when in use, the tower part sways back and forth.


Work has progressed and a few concrete floors have been formed. This one had just been poured.


Instead of just one height been done as had been, the latest is these very tall walls were lifted into place. I would guess this will be the height, plus roof top equipment. Note how the new wall wraps around the side of the original part. No one from the ground will really see that. There has obviously been some effect on the apartment building next door, but remember there was and old part of the hotel at the back that was demolished.


This small building sits next the old Manor and where the windows are papered was our local cafe for many years, especially in our early times here when not very much was available nearby in the way of food and coffee. After a couple of changes of ownership we stopped going there. It had lost its 'feeling'. Next door is a convenience store and apartments above which I don't think are occupied now as it is about to be redeveloped with a tall extension at the rear. I am not quite sure where at the rear as there is very little space.



29 comments:

  1. Yes Andrew, I am envious. Your erection is bigger than mine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Victor, maybe the end result once both are complete will show the truth.

      Delete
  2. To start with I wondered where you were going with this one.
    To me cranes are amazing things I wonder why people ever want to be in them and riding the hook was the most awesome thing to do, don't thing it is done much now.
    Merle..........

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Merle, just some childish immaturity on my part. I've seen old footage of people riding the hook. It looked terrifying. I hope it is not done at all now, in western countries at least. Building sites are dangerous workplaces.

      Delete
  3. The closest coffee shop is almost always the centre of a residential neighbourhood. It doesn't have to have an amazing array of cooked food... cakes and sandwiches may be enough. But it does have to provide a social heart for the locals to have lunch and after work relaxation.

    Hopefully, when the papers come off the windows, you will have a great coffee spot again. I could not survive, socially speaking, if our street's coffee shop closed.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hels, I thought the cafe was going to be the developers site office, but R just told me it has reopened as a sandwich shop. You are ever the European with a social life at the coffee shop.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Andrww, probaly nice job and well paid but it is not easy..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gosia, it is well paid but very hard work.

      Delete
  6. Not a job for me, the operator has to climb all the way to the cabin at the top.
    Hels is right, without our little milk bar/coffee shop life would be all Southland or nothing. Our local property developer (1970s) insisted on this shop and had a hell of a fight with Southland over it but he won in
    the end.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jah Teh, we watched the crane operator climb up to his cabin a few days ago. He has a dicky knee and was only using one leg to step up, mostly.

      Good to hear you have a 'local' coffee shop. We wouldn't want you hopping the bus to South Side Six. Maybe there has been a name change since I knew it.

      Delete
  7. I remember walking around a college campus last year. All the buildings were "erected" in a certain year. Why couldn't they just say built? :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Quite possibly because the outer walls are preconstructed off-site and simply erected to permanent position once delivered.

      Delete
    2. River, I don't think so. Susie, It is one of those wanky things, like I purchased a new pair of shoes, rather than bought a new pair of shoes. Now, no one ever buys a house. They always purchase a residential property.

      Delete
    3. We're getting too posh for our own good. Let's go back to being plain speaking Aussies.

      Delete
  8. Crane operation is for adventurers, hopefully those with a person good at figuring setting up, or else. Lift something too heavy for the counter weight or capacity of the arm? Then the crane is in the news. On with the lawsuits! How many killed or maimed, cars destroyed and I only watch cranes for the wreckage.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Strayer, I have a You Tube collection of cranes going bad and a few are in Australia.

      Delete
  9. Cranes, well I have never seen so many in person than near Coloundra in Q'Land, there were 20 way up in the sky building a new University.
    It's good that the front is being retained, well good in one way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. WA, apparently cranes are a sign of prosperity of an area. I might suggest cranes on the sky are a sign of boom before bust.

      Delete
  10. Whatever they get paid, it's not enough. I wonder if people working in this field played with LEGO a lot as children?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Craig, you can be so disappointing at times. Surely Meccano.

      Delete
    2. I never had or played with a meccano set, only lego. But thank you for bringing up that painful memory of my deprived childhood...

      Delete
  11. Interesting to see a bird's eye view of construction, I've only ever watched things from ground level view which makes it hard to see much more than swinging cranes and outer walls.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River, even though we can see what is happening, most of it we don't understand. Nothing seems to happen apart from workers being busy, and then suddenly a new floor appears.

      Delete
  12. Haha! You lost me at the 'thingy' that slides back and forth :) Thank god I had dinner well before I read this post Andrew, my stomach is doing somersaults! Thank goodness for people who don't have vertigo, imagine no skyrise..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grace, I should have zoomed in on the working bit, but maybe it is too far away to show properly. Yes, it would be a very low rise city if everyone had issues with heights.

      Delete
  13. "Instead of just one height been done as had been, the latest is these very tall walls were lifted into place."
    See!
    Preconstructed off site, hence the erection of not the building of. my son-in-law is in construction, runs a concrete pump company, so I know a little about it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River, we have seen much concrete pumped into the site. I see concrete pumping, but I really don't know much about it. How do you stop left over concrete from hardening in the pumping truck?

      Delete
    2. The truck keeps turning all the way back to the depot where leftover concrete is used for other purposes, like paving slabs etc I think, or it is dumped and then crushed once dry to be used as road base maybe.

      Delete
    3. Ok, interesting.

      Delete