Monday, January 26, 2015

Sunday Supplement (do not adjust your set. It is Monday, here at least)

I can be a nasty piece of work at times, but I am always perfectly polite. I was walking along a street and this woman made a cutting comment to me which is playing on mind. To keep it kind of anonymous, let me call it by the fictitious name of Edsall Street. I was walking in a straight line along the street when she stepped back from the street bank teller machine. Where she was going to walk on to was vague, so I just kept walking. After I dodged around her, she said something like, please go first. I was well past by then. I was so annoyed because she was accusing me of doing something wrong and I did nothing wrong but walk along the footpath, head down but not looking at my phone. Surely if you step back onto the street from a teller machine, you look out for who might be walking past?

The invented Edsall Street runs off a major street, and let me just use the anonymous title of Glenferrie Road. Let me think of an anon suburb name. Ok, let's call it Malvern on the cusp of Armadale. It wasn't always so, but Malvern has become a quite Jewish area now. The Jews of Malvern are not the ones who wear weird clothing and head gear. No, just very middle class people who might happen to say shalom instead of hello.

I was walking past a bakery and a couple who seemed to be well out of their area were complaining to each other that Glick's Bakery in the imaginary Glenferrie Road was closed. In a loud voice he said, must be making too much money and close on Saturday.

This caused me to run through my head everyone who I know and who would know why Glick's Bakery is closed on Saturday. With a couple of exceptions, most of our friends would know why a Jewish business is closed on Saturday,  a day of rest and worship like Sunday is for Christians. I then ran through my head my family. Most would not. R would, Sister and Bone Doctor would but the rest which numbers rather a lot would not have a clue.

Why is this so?

I have always worked with people from all over the world. R and myself lived in a Jewish area. We have had close contact with Jewish people. I shan't say the cliche some of my best friends are Jewish, but possibly some are my best friends are Jewish. The Jewish people I know don't wear their religion or race on their sleeve which is rather how I like people to be about their religion especially.

Never confirmed, but I was told my nephew's partner is Jewish. She is a gorgeous blonde and after I was told she is Jewish, I can see it in her face.

You know how areas where gay people tend to cluster then become fashionable to others, prices rise and often they then become ungay, but just off hand, I can think of a few areas where that has happened but preceding being a gay area, it was a Jewish area. I wonder if this applies in other countries around the world?

While Judaism is being dragged kicking and screaming into official acceptance of gay people, as are other religions, I've always thought generally gay people and Jewish people kind of had a connection. Yep, Jews wore a yellow star, gays wore a pink triangle. They often met similar fates under Herr Hitler.

22 comments:

  1. To tell the truth I know no jewish people but then again they maybe and I don't know, religion is a private thing and I too like it that way.
    Merle.................

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    1. Merle, yes, you might be surprised. I agree, religion is a private thing and people can keep it to themselves.

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  2. Andrew, you were unlucky to meet that ugly woman... I have Jewish friends they are great people. Tolerance is the most important quality I believe

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    1. Gosia, I was annoyed because she thought she was right. Yes, we should all be tolerant. Many of us try hard.

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  3. My father was Jewish. Bless his heart when I was born he suggested changing his surname so that I would never know the prejudice he did (he was a German Jew). Fortunately my mother refused to even contemplate the name change.
    I have indeed been called a Jew bitch among other things, which doesn't compare to what he faced.
    Tolerance is indeed something to work on. Often.

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    1. EC, such name calling is vile. At times it might be easier to Anglicise a first name, but the family name is just that and should be passed on.

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  4. I apologised immediately to a woman for an unnecessary retort I made to her only for her to heap rudeness back at me such that I then wished I hadn't apologised in the first place.

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    1. Very annoying, I am sure Victor.

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  5. When Jewish refugees starting arriving in Melbourne from 1948-1956, they settled largely in Carlton and Coburg etc, There were 6 kosher butcher shops, 5 kosher cake shops, 4 synagogues, a tennis club and endless sunday schools, all within close walking distance of everyone's home.

    By the 1960s, most families had moved to Caulfield, Elwood and StKilda, and so all the kosher food shops, synagogues etc moved south of the river. Jewish kindergartens, primary and secondary schools set up.

    Carlton, once our home, is now full of gorgeous Italian facilities.

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    1. Hels, and wasn't Bondi home to many Jews in Sydney?

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  6. Some people are just horrid, religious or nay

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    1. Fen, true. I did kind of wander about in the post a bit.

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  7. Some people! If it doesn't suit them they just have to say by not being polite. I don't know any Jewish people that I know of. Most people that I know don't thrust religion down my neck, or do I to them.
    Happy Australia Day, Andrew.

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    1. Thanks WA. I agree about religion. Practice but don't preach.

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    1. Belle, is that a joke? If you know the Australian bank advertisements, it is. I think it was that bank.

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  9. I know a Jewish family, (probably more but not confirmed), I worked with V and once had lunch at her house. The young son said grace in Hebrew, then we ate, but not a single dairy product was on the table, because they do not mix meats and dairy. After the lunch all dishes had to be cleared and washed before we could have dessert because the kids wanted canned apricots and ice cream, a dairy product. To my surprise the apricots were served and eaten first, then ice cream in new clean bowls. I noticed also that the dairy products were kept to one side of the kitchen and meat/veg/etc to the other side with a certain area for the meat. Separate knives and everything!
    I'd known about this from books I'd read, but never seen in in action.
    This family weren't the type to cram their religion down anyone's throat, they were just nice normal people who valued work and education ad did things a little differently at home.

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    1. River, what an interesting snapshot. Puts a new angle on about using the right knife at dinner.

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  10. I'll step in with a bit of trivia. I listen to people going on and on about the wearing of hijabs or the full rig for Muslim women but nobody says anything about the Jewish sect where women wear wigs as the husband is the only one to see their hair. There are so many sects in all religions that I can't see why anyone should point fingers. During Passover, very strict Kosher families even use a different kitchen for this time.

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    1. Jah Teh, the second kitchen has caught on rather, with people often having an outdoor kitchen, especially Asian people. Grilling, frying and baking can certainly mess up your walls over time.

      As I guess you know, I don't like extreme anything in people.

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  11. Wouldn't it be brilliant if people were just people and as John Lennon said.. 'No religion too '.. man would still find something to fight about but it would be one thing less oui! I'm not sure which part of your tale I enjoyed most Andrew, the fiction or the non fiction part :)

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  12. 'Imagine all the people, living to..........something. If it not about religion, it is about land. What fiction? I must reread. Oh yes, it wasn't fiction.

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