Thursday, July 10, 2014

Eurocruise 05/06 The Blinking Eye

Our friends were leaving this afternoon for Manchester, but firstly we took them into town on the bus with a stop off for brunch at Sister 3's cafe. Sister three, the worse for wear after the previous night, had not fronted but her daughter had stepped into the breach. I am sure you will agree, this is a nice cottage garden we passed by on the way to the bus stop.


Grey Street leads down to the River Tyne and in town is lined with posh shops and fine dining establishments but it is all very discreet. You can't be  too flashy with your money in a working class town but there is money in Newcastle.


Dog Leap steps lead up to the Castle Keep, which I think is an old town gate or fort. We climbed it last time and had no intention of doing so this time.


While we menfolk in 2008 climbed the stairs up to The Keep, the womenfolk sensibly took to the gin in this pub.


To the right you can see the Tyne Bridge.


This bridge is for buses and trains.

Does the Tyne Bridge remind you of another one similar?


As well as many bridges over the Tyne, there is also a tunnel underneath and plans for another. This red and white bridge is a swing bridge.


The southern side of the Tyne is called Gateshead. I think the building you can see is an arts performance space. You can also see the Gateshead Millennium Bridge.
 

Another view of the Tyne Bridge.


Sand, deck chairs, there are umbrellas there somewhere too usually means a beach, but this is a riverside beach.


The Gateshead Millennium Bridge is also known less formally as the Winking Eye or the Blinking Eye. The walkway lifts up to give passage to river craft too high to pass under. It is opened daily for bridge geeks. Ok, yes, I wanted to see it.


A wonderful building given a new life as a space for art.


It must be nearly fully open now.



Huge hydraulics operate the bridge.


We found a bus to get us back to the centre of town but we could not use our day tickets and had to pay again. Gusto in Newcastle looks a bit different to Gusto in Aomori, Japan.

On the edge of Grainger Market was Farnons Department Store. It has long gone, but it was where R worked his first job after leaving school.


From the number 40 bus home, St James' Park, home of the Newcastle United football team.


Sister 1's husband delivered our friends to the station late afternoon for them to journey to Manchester where they would be collected by a friend to stay the night. We journey to Manchester the following day. Unbelievably, family members turned up again that night at home for a final goodbye, but they pleasingly did not stay too long. Sister 1 has a daughter the same age as Little Jo, and she brought presents for Little Jo, even though they had never met. She also brought us a bottle of Scotch to send us on our way.

I wished I could click my fingers and be home. I was, well both of us, were well over our holiday.

20 comments:

  1. Andrew, the cottage garden is nice of course. Dog Leap steps are binteresting I would like to take them. What a fun.

    But East or West home the best - is it true. In my opinion is true.

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    1. Dear Gosia, nothing truer than east is east and west is west, and of course home is always best.

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  2. The cottage garden is lovely - and I would happily spend some hours talking with the gardener - and acquiring seeds and cuttings.
    Dog Leap Steps? Too many for me.
    Love the bridges too.

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    1. EC, would that not be so delightful, to talk to your gardener about plans and prospects for your garden.

      Dog Leap Stairs and The Keep nearly killed us in 2008. No way would we do that again.

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  3. You crammed too much in
    Overload overload

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    1. Possibly John, but it a long way to travel and you feel you have to take full advantage of your time.

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  4. I do like a good bridge or two, had to read a few times,missed bits the first time, interesting place.
    Merle.........

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    1. Merle, maybe my post are took big. But we are at the end now. Thanks for reading them.

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  5. When I was first in the UK in the 1960s, Newcastle was a bit of a tragedy. I remember it very sadly :(

    Now they have poured truckloads of money into the CBD and the Newcastle and Gateshead Quaysides etc, so life has returned to the city. The shops, bars, river and green spaces look sophisticated.

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    1. Hels, you so knowledgeable about things, even Newcastle, it seems.

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  6. A super looking bridge. You certainly were cramming a lot into your holiday. TOH likes to get home after 3 weeks whereas I could go on and on.

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    1. Diane, I am afraid I am with ToH. I like my home and miss it as soon as I leave. You going to PNG, clearly indicates your adventurous spirit.

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  7. Good to see Newcastle now as such a vibrant city with all the new development along the riverside. You'll have plenty of time to catch up on your sleep on the wonderfully relaxing flight home!

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    1. Fun60, I was not sleep deprived. I was just mentally exhausted by socialising. You are being sarcastic about the flight home? I may have dozed at times but really, I did not sleep for the whole time.

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  8. A riverside beach! I love it! I like the gorilla statue outside that pub too and the cottage garden is just perfect.

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    1. River, I had heard of the beaches put in for summer, in Paris, but I didn't expect one there. The cottage garden is great, the best we saw.

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  9. Love the Old Flour Mill building Andrew, it will be perfect as an 'arty' space.. No one does cottage garden like the British, so pretty. I bet Little Joe was thrilled with your return with all her pressies :)

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    1. Grace, it is a terrific space. We saw inside the last time we were there. On the outside was a huge mural and an exhibition of his work inside and the artist lived in the same Japanese village as our friend in Japan. I think his name was Nara.

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  10. What a fascinating design for an opening bridge. Quite unexpected.

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    1. Victor, it is quite an original design, I believe. It has a counterweight part to help lift it up.

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