Friday, June 27, 2014

Eurocruise 24/05 Amsterdam

Nearly to Rotterdam, the boat turned right into a canal to head to Amsterdam.


We didn't see too many cows and sheep on our journey, but here are some between Rotterdam and Amsterdam.


Rear of Amsterdam Centraal Station.


We arrived a little early, so the captain took us past our mooring point to look at some buildings on the harbour.



I think here we ended up being triple berthed, that is three ships side by side and you have to pass through each one to get to shore. This is a sister ship, the AmaVerde.


Very nicely dressed for boating.


Walking to a point nearby to catch a boat for an Amsterdam Canal cruise. Other choices were Van Gogh Museum and city tour or an open air museum. This section of the road can lift up to allow large vessels underneath.


A train passed by.


And a tram, again a Siemens, as we have in Melbourne.


It seems motor scooters can use bike lanes. We were warned, if you are on a bike lane and you get hit, it is your fault and you will be responsible for cycle and cyclist damage.





Lots of party groups on boats.


He is looking at me. I can see the lust in his eyes.


Houses in Amsterdam always need a neighbour to lean on.






More partying young men.


Distinctly wonky.


At the end of our canal cruise,we left the canal boat and found ourselves in a mass of people, bicycles, buses, trams and did I say people?




A protest march made matters even more crowded. As vibrant as Amsterdam is, it was very dirty in public areas. At times we were almost walking on a carpet of cigarette butts. Dutch people take pride in the cleanliness and neatness of their homes. Why are the streets allowed to remain so dirty? We didn't see this in Budapest or anywhere in Austria or Germany.


This clock was a useful point for orienting ourselves. Even when hidden, you could still here it strike.


We were given some free time to wander. Trams had coloured symbols on their destination signs for those who can't read, as did Sydney's old trams.


A flower market. 60% of what they sell must be plant related. You can guess the remaining 40% are tourist trinkets.



Until I was just looking at a map, I didn't realise how close we were to a gay bar, the torture museum, mensa university, home of Pathe and a lot more. There were some queer sights in the Rokin area.



Time for coffee and cake.


Plumb line required.


Our bus then took us to the outer edges of Amsterdam on an interesting enough trip. I understand a metro railway is under construction and a building had collapsed.


Peter, do you know where we are?



Countryside, fresh air, green grass and a windmill.


One lucky bird has a nest.


We had used minor roads to get to the edge of the city, but a freeway had us back at our boat very quickly.


The next morning we were catching the train to Brussels and then Eurostar to London. We walked to the station to make sure we knew where we needed to be the next day.


The station was busy, but clearly laid out.



It was our last evening on board, so we really got our money's worth at dinner that evening and breakfast the next morning. We were pleased enough to be at the end of our tour. At times it was tiring and always people around. We were looking forward to be off on our own for a bit.

18 comments:

  1. Andrew, Amsterdam seems a nice city bu I didn't know it is so clean city. It, s also very crowded in public places. The trams are modern and comfortable for commuters. And yous tour was very attractive and you saw and visited a lot of landmarks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We did see a lot, Gosia. Amsterdam is not very big really.

      Delete
  2. I am loving travelling vicariously with you - thank you. And my anti-social self would have needed some down time after the boat as well.
    When I went to Antarctica I travelled with a friend and we shared a room. The very first day we were on land we booked separate rooms - NOT because we had fallen out, but because we needed some down time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I understand exactly EC and agree the fault, if it is one, is entirely with us. I find being social very tiring.

      Delete
  3. Did you have any of those funny cakes or mushrooms when you were in Amsterdam?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill, not at our age. Last time we were there R's sister bought some stuff, I expect to sell once they were back in England.

      Delete
  4. Hello Andrew,

    Well, your boat cruise has certainly been packed with interest from start to finish. So much to take in and absorb from so many different viewpoints, no wonder that you needed some breathing space at the end.

    We had been warned about the crowds in Amsterdam by our Dutch friends and do feel that , on balance, we probably do like Rotterdam more. However, we do have our eyes firmly set on some of the Museums and Galleries of Amsterdam as we can believe that they are without equal.

    And, of course, we cannot forget that this cruise brought us together in the real world. That was good.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ayLa, it certainly was. I don't have knowledge of Rotterdam, thinking of it only as a port. But I think if you like it, it is worthy of consideration. I expect Amsterdam is a bit of a hidden city, with interesting galleries and museums in small spaces. But truly, I was disappointed in its public presentation as a very respected Euro city.

      I won't bang on again how kind it was of you to show us the city you love, instead, what a wondrous thing the internet is.

      PS R, who used to decry Face Book is now somewhat of an FB addict. I look occasionally, but he draws my attention to, Jane and Lance have posted something.

      Delete
  5. Another enjoyable day, TY. The buildings with leanings are interesting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. FC, they prop each other up as they slowly sink in the silt below ground level.

      Delete
  6. Melbourne seems closer these days.......

    The pleasure was all ours.

    Love to R xxxx

    ReplyDelete
  7. Those residences and businesses along the canals are gorgeous. 17th century and squashy, but tall and well preserved. And tons of natural light from all that glass, hopefully.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hels, I had not really noticed the windows, but yes there are a lot. Didn't Amsterdam have a building width tax, whereas London had a window tax.

      Delete
  8. You have such a drole way of describing things Andrew, I find myself chuckling all the way through :) There are some very 'interesting' buildings in Amsterdam and many boats with handsome young men floating about.. would be hard to know where to look first :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grace, I suppose what you say about my descriptions is good. I got the feeling that Amsterdam is a place to party for many Europeans.

      Delete
  9. Leaning houses and each has a hook up the top to haul the furniture up!
    I adored Amsterdam.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fen, I felt like it a place that I need a bigger taste of to really like. Yes, the hooks, and the window removal.

      Delete