Sunday, March 16, 2014

Melbourne's Lanes

Diane suggested I should take some photos of Melbourne's lanes. While I am sure many have done it before, I thought it was a great idea, but maybe the camera, maybe the operator, maybe both,  did not capture the lanes as I imagined them.


Not a lane as such but the Degraves Street subway, properly known as Campbell Arcade, under Flinders Street from the station. To left and out of the photo was a hairdresser, so I had a haircut.


We don't have to go to Belgium to get Belgian food. I have just ascended the stairs from the subway.


Looking down Degraves Street back towards Flinders Street Station.


We never sit here. It is just too crowded with tables very close together.


I think this is Scott Alley, with a couple of eating places.


Centre Place is kind of a continuation of Degraves Street and we often eat here as it is a little less manic.


A few places in Manchester Lane.


Beside the General Post Office that is not a post office, or anything really at the moment as it is being renovated for the Swedish company H & M to open is first Victorian store, is narrow walkway that opens out to become Angel Lane. More places to eat.


Hardware Lane used to be very busy but it seems to have fallen from favour a little. Perhaps I was there a bit too early as lunch time is its busiest period.



Well, they are the better known lanes for eating out in Melbourne. In winter they will have outdoor heating of some description.

22 comments:

  1. I do like lanes, and alleys. They are often filled with precisely the sort of shops and food I enjoy. Quirky, and a little less mainstream. That said, we don't have enough lanes (in use) here in Canberra.

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    1. EC, I did rather concentrate on the food lanes, but yes, there are others with interesting shops and what they are known for, bars.

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  2. Andrew, As I know Australia is not crowded country but in my opinion there a lot of people are in the streets. And what's more yours lanes are very clean in some cities in Europe are very dirty.

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    1. Gosia, they weren't always clean but now the council makes sure they are, even those without shops or any retail. They were for piling and storing rubbish and while some still are, they are kept tidy.

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  3. So lanes are like alleyways? No cars, just walking? These look like fun.

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    1. They are Rubye. Some will have cars in them at restricted times, mainly for deliveries.

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  4. You have a few nooks and crannies left, in Sydney they build something and sell off as apartments for a million dollars, I love little natty places in cities and lanes always have neat little coffee shops.
    Merle.........

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    1. Merle, we have to be vigilant that councils don't sell off the lanes to developers who want more land. Too many here and I expect in Sydney have already been lost.

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  5. I enjoyed wandering around the lanes. More photos of Melbourne please.

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    1. Fun60, I always try to use lanes to get around rather than the main streets.

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  6. I spend a good part of my working day in one of two of the lanes next to my office. Love it!!!

    In my blog I was very interested in the history of our lanes which went from rubbish-bin-access to friendly, usable space in a fairly short time. Thanks for the link

    Hels
    http://highriser.blogspot.com.au/2014/03/melbournes-lanes.html

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    1. Hels, the transformation has been rapid, as had the changes in Flinders Lane from the rag trade, which I am sure you know a bit about.

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  7. I mean
    http://melbourneblogger.blogspot.com.au/2010/03/melbournes-lanes-history.html

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  8. Your lanes look a lot busier than ours here in Adelaide. We don't have so many lanes either, not for sitting and eating anyway. There are many back lanes connecting businesses, but they are mostly loading bays and rubbish removal. A little out of the city centre are many small residential streets that are so narrow they'd qualify as lanes and we have the back lanes left over from the days of the night carts, where kids would play safely away from traffic.

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    1. River, maybe the time will come for your lanes. Lanes would be great for kids to play in, but perhaps not so much for ball games if they are cobblestone.

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  9. We love our lanes in Melbourne! Your photos are great, they have picked up all these lanes from different angles to how I see them. Funny I've never sat and had coffee at Degraves Street but I know if I was visiting a city with an area like this I would jump to!

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    1. Thanks Jackie. The lanes can get crazy at lunch peak times, but with a great atmosphere. I think I would like Melbourne as a visitor too.

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  10. What strikes me is how unique these lanes are - I like how they're so narrow! We don't have that here in the states.

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    1. They were built as service lanes for buildings that faced main streets. The city of Melbourne was a planned city and not an evolved city, like Sydney.

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  11. Tres jolie trip Andrew, Melbourne is renowned for its quirky laneways oui? I think Perth may be catching up :)

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  12. Seems like Perth well and truly is catching up, and Sydney too.

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