Thursday, August 15, 2013

Winter Colour

Mother used to call this plant a Japonica when we were kids. I don't know why, as she now calls it a Flowering Quince. Its botanical name is Chaenomeles and it sits beside Mother's driveway. Of course I did not know its botanical name. Thanks ABC Gardening Show.



This is quite a popular plant in Australia and goes by either Sarsaparilla Plant, Purple Coral Pea or Happy Wanderer. It's native to Australia and its botanical name is Hardenbergia. I did know that name. I am such an all rounder. While it is very pretty when in flower and it is a climber, the under area is bare and they can look quite ordinary if not maintained. I took these photos at Sister's.



This White Magnolia in Park Street, South Yarra, has not reached its peak yet, but I won't be free to photograph it in a week's time. Its correct name is Magnolia Denudata.Yep, knew that name too. While I am gardenless now, I have developed four gardens in my life and they were all good experiences. Just not for me anymore but I still retain some memory of them.


16 comments:

  1. I imagine that most people would like their children to grow up on a quarter acre block with a big back yard and lots of fruit trees. We might move into gardenless homes later on in life, but your photos are still very evocative of the wonderful childhood years.

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    1. Hels, I never realised what a privileged childhood I had with grass to run on, trees to climb and dirt to dig in.

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  2. My mother used to recite a poem called "The White Magnolia Tree" full of sentimental tosh. You can see the poem here (if you can stand the animation on the page!)
    http://www.angelofoz.com/the_white_magnolia_tree_poem/
    Everytime I see a white magnolia,I find myself reciting it!

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    1. RJ, I am so confused. I am mixing the poem up with a Bobby Darin song, I think. I have heard the poem recited and I will listen to it again. Nothing wrong with sentimental shmaltz. I enjoy a brief cry.

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  3. I knew the Hardenbergia was also the Happy Wanderer, we had one growing over a backyard aviary once to keep the budgies cooler.
    I like the white magnolia, but I prefer the pink one which is the Port Wine magnolia.

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    1. Are you sure River? the Port Wine is deep purple and flowers a bit later. I like the Soulangeana, the normal one that must be in full bloom or just past it in your town.

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    2. It is a very deep pink, some call it purple and I probably should too, it is much closer to purple. I like the pink one too, that must be the Soulangeana.

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    3. River, I think that is the Negri, the port wine one. I won't say what I refer to it as that sounds a bit like Negri. I have to take US readers into account and it is a bad word for them.

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  4. These are some lovely pictures Andrew. I especially like the White Magnolia. Here in the states the blooms are disappearing for the year since autumn is near :)

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    1. Keith, thanks for the compliments. I have become quite aware via my blog friends that while we get exited about our forthcoming spring, you are about slide into winter depression.

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  5. I am very impressed with your horticultural knowledge. Love that white magnolia but then that blue one adds so much colour to a garden that I would like that one as well.

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    1. Fun60, it would probably grow in your country well enough. We once had them growing up either side of garage door and they were great when in flower, but other times, not good.

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  6. I always imagine that Melbourne gardens will have a mixture of the old fashioned European style planting and the sub tropical. Is that right? I don't remember from my time there many moons ago. Magnolias are magnificent and although they will grow here our garden isn't sheltered enough for them.

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    1. Pretty well correct Craig, add to that Australian natives. We can grow most things that you can here because our winter is cold, but by midsummer, those sort of plants usually look exhausted. Our hydrangeas are wonderful but once the first killer hot dry day arrives, they are stuffed.

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  7. All beautiful Andrew, but the white magnolia looks perfect against the white fretwork of the terrace balcony n'est pas?

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  8. Grace, only that I could afford to live there. It is quite some place and address.

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