Saturday, August 24, 2013

Appalled, of St Kilda Road

I simply won't have it that this is an acceptable punishment. If you assault someone to the point that they nearly die, you deserve a very long stretch if not life in gaol. It goes without saying that if the victim does die, you get the same punishment.

http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/judges-cut-jail-time-for-neonazi-who-attacked-vietnamese-student-20130820-2s8p2.html

And what about this man, Liam Danial Sweeney, with influential parents who could afford the best barrister. He glassed someone in the face and did not even receive a gaol term.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/jul/26/too-privileged-jail-lawyer-australia

I would welcome any attempt to tell me why such assaults should not result in life imprisonment. These are not crimes of passion, or domestic arguments, which should also be viewed seriously. They are not petty crimes. They are violent and often random and unprovoked assault and just should not be tolerated by society. The police put in the hard work to get a conviction against someone who commits a violent crime, and the perpetrator gets the proverbial slap on the wrist.

28 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you Miss Gray from Tunbridge Wells.

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  2. The second case in particular seems to amount to an absence of justice; especially if the fine applied was no more than petty cash to a prosperous family.

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    1. Victor, money can't buy you everything, but it can buy rather a lot.

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  3. My comment above does not imply that I condone what occurred in the first case; on the contrary the perpetrator's actions and attitude are simply appalling but at least he received a gaol sentence.

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    1. Funny, the second case was added as an afterthought by me, but yes, it is more serious.

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  4. Well that's the problem. Damn if you do and damn if you don't. Law can be twisted (which is how the fat cat rolls)

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    1. Michael, the law certainly seems to be very flexible, twisted if you like.

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  5. I am with you, Andrew. Empty the gaols of drug users, public drunks and debtors. Use them instead for violent thugs.

    A man shot and killed his ex-wife on a suburban Melbourne street in front of her children. Delich hid behind the garage of his ex-wife's home in November 2011 and waited for her armed with a semi-automatic handgun. He had been thinking about murdering his family for months but decided he couldn't bring himself to kill his sons. Lucky them :(

    Two years earlier Delich had tried exactly the same plan. He turned up at the Mulgrave home with a gun and threatened to kill Ms Locic and his sons. Last time he was caught and was sentenced ONLY to a 12-month community based order for threats to kill and for having a gun. He was already KNOWN to be dangerous, yet he was back on the streets with a community-based order!!! This time (The Age 14th June 2013) he was caught and got 30 years for murder and having a gun.

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    1. Hels, it troubles me that I don't remember that case. I just checked and there is nothing that rings a bell for me. Am I so used to violent murders that I don't take notice of them in the media anymore?

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  6. It's all rather sick-making, really. The mindless hate and callousness as much as the legal results.

    The Briscoe case sounds much the same as the Palm Island [Qld] case in 2004 which resulted in riots - but of course the NT is different again.
    Some young white chap left the Alice Springs casino a few years ago and went hooning down the riverbed of the Todd after which one Aboriginal man died. Ho hum.

    The idea that imprisonment should balance punishment [deterrence] against the possibility of rehabilitation or just plain protecting the public has some merit, but it's hard to imagine that the threat of punishment means much to someone like a neo-nazi sociopath.
    I doubt he could be rehabilitated very easily. Wouldn't he just take those same core 'values' with him into a prison or detention centre?

    I know!.... let's vote for a politician who will know what to do or perhaps let us share some ideas?

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    1. FC, I remember both of those cases. The former was a case of we know that you know that we know. The second, just a road bump on the bed of the Todd.

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  7. Justice is a question of money !There are no other justice in the whole world !

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    1. Gattina, it is getting more like that. Society is going backwards in the area of justice.

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  8. Australia needs to impose harsher punishment for violent crimes - but this requires legislative changes. This requires political pressure by civic groups... and unfortunately, the lack of political will of ethnic minorities in seeking these changes often means that some of their community will bear the brunt of their apathy.

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    1. Thanks for the comment Sobriquet. Those disadvantaged by law have little power to change it. It does take altruistic people to force change.

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  9. the perfect example that proves your point is that murdering rapist who was out on parole when he Did IT Again to ms Jill Meagher. Hels is right: clear out anybody in the slammer for merely 'using', and anybody in for not paying parking fines, and stop paroling all those baby-bashing defacto fathers.
    Gattina is right as well.

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    1. Ann, haven't you paid those fines yet? The person who shall remain nameless was already proven to be a violent murderer. How could be have been let out?

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  10. There certainly does seem to be way too much wrist slapping going on. One begins to wonder what sort of briberies are going on within the judicial system.

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    1. River, I might be a bit ostrich about it, but I doubt there is direct bribery. In the second case above, I would suggest that it is case of looking after your own, the old boys network.

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    2. Still bribery, just not financial. "I won't tell if you don't..."

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    3. Yep River, sadly very much like that.

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  11. These are the most disturbing of crimes, for they are not provoked by anything other than the sociopathic nature of the offender. It's truly disturbing.

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    1. Keith, you may well be aware of the recent murder of an Australian in Oklahoma. That case just takes things one step further where it seems someone was picked off as almost sport. But your laws are strong and punishments severe, which rather goes against my argument.

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  12. The law is an arse and no doubt about it Andrew!

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    1. We've just got to make a noise when we see things like this Grace.

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  13. I've been disgusted by the recent examples of violent offenders either 'getting off' or being let out early for good behaviour only to offend again or worse.

    I would consider myself one of them dirty pinko leftist do gooders but I can't abide this violence. It disgusts me. Lock 'em up, throw away the key.

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    1. M, I thing we lefties get very annoyed about this sort of thing as we get older.

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