Saturday, July 13, 2013

Wired Up

We always had a telephone when I was young, whether it was a crank the handle phone, or a dial phone. I recall visiting Mother's friend, and he had a plastic dial phone. There was kind of finger handle behind it and you could pick it up and it was so light. I was very impressed.

Many people did not have telephones and 'are you on the phone' was a question often asked, meaning did you have a home telephone. I haven't used it for years, but I still have a Telstra push button phone. I used to do phone banking with it. What lovely big buttons it had and was very easy to use.

Now, as I type at the computer, with our cordless telephone sitting nearby, with its second handpiece in R's bedroom, with our smart phones lying about, with our old dinosaur laptop sitting in a drawer, as R is using our notebook computer, but wondering if we should have bought a tablet, our internet enabled tv is on. It is not connected to the internet. I will wait until it easy to do. I really don't see the need to yet, but no doubt in the future, our tv will be connected to the internet.

It must have been good to see the arrival of cars and electricity in the early 20th century, but boy, what a time I have lived through. TV had barely arrived when I was born and no one had one. Then came colour tv. Video recorders arrived, along with telephone answering machines that recorded on tape.

FM radio. I was one of the first in my town to get an FM car radio. There was only ABC Classic FM broadcasting. Now it is all about digital broadcasting and I have embraced it with lust, as I have podcasts.

I could go and and on about it but repeating myself, what a amazing time I have lived through and what amazing things that are happening now. The future cannnot be forecast, but you can safely say, you ain't seen nothin' yet.

That must almost conclude the last of unfinished posts that seemed like a good idea when I started them.

14 comments:

  1. Nothing is guaranteed but change, taxes and death! I remember the icebox being taken out and a new fridge put in its place!!! I remember my grandmother not using the wrangle and washboard any more, when her washing machine arrived.

    But mostly life was changed when tv first arrived for the 1956 Olympic Games. And you were quite right... noone I had ever met could afford one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hels, tv was one of the most significant changes and the worry that it would stop family communication because everyone one would silently sit and watch tv, and of course it would kill the movie theatres. Was the word wrangle intentional on your part? A mix of wringer and mangle? So clever.

      Delete
  2. Answering machine with a 30 minute tape [don't ask me why 30 mins]. Came home one day and checked messages. One was about 28 minutes of a small voice saying making profound statements like "ga ga goo goo mmmnum mung gope". Just before the tape ran out, there was the sound of a frustrated adult female voice saying "oh no! Not again!"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's funny FC. You listened to the whole tape. I remember us trying to record a message on our machine for callers who rang in. We were in hysterics. Then we drove off to a public phone to ring home to see if it worked.

      Delete
  3. I don't know if I'm making up this memory but I remember there being a big switch to FM from AM and there being a lot of purists who didn't want to go. There was a station that my father listened to that made the switch from AM to FM, it was a big deal at the time.. I can't even remember what it was. Anyway, it's all water under the bridge now isn't it?

    We never had a push button telephone growing up. Everyone was rocking the big button phone you're talking about but we had the old circle dial (beige, of course). I remember being so adamant about all that time wasted dialing on our old dinosaur while everyone else had tonnes of spare time because their dialing was so quick with a push button phone. Now we just tell Siri to call our BFFs for us without having to lift a finger at all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. M, if your father liked classical music, it may well have been ABC FM Classic. I remember FM as being much better but I now think you can't beat a good AM signal. Later came a time when AM radio broadcast in stereo, but that did not last.

      I recall the re-dial button on the push button phones. How much better was that than having to turn the dial.

      Btw, BFFs don't necessarily last. See today's later post.

      Delete
    2. I know, very sad :(

      re: station. It was definitely rock and roll. Maybe 3kz?? kzfm? Ahh the "good old days". hehe

      Delete
    3. Ok M. I know what you are talking about, sadly.

      Delete
  4. Just when you think that technology has given us almost everyone we could ever want, something else comes along and makes us think "what did we do before ****". I think the internet has changed things incredibly, mostly for the good, but not always. It's hard to imagine that in 20 years we'll be looking back and thinking how old fashioned everything was now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed Craig, qualified by, should we still be alive. I very well remember the struggle with computers, programs and printers in the mid to late nineties. Now, mostly, everything just works.

      Delete
  5. I remember the days before TV. I remember when a neighbour friend of dad's got one half the neighbourhood was invited in on a Saturday night to watch something. When they announced it was colour TV we got very excited, then just as quickly disappointed to find all they'd done was hang pink or blue cellophane over the screen so it wasn't so glaring. I was about 8 and lost interest in TV until we got our own a few years later. Phones held no interest for me.

    ReplyDelete
  6. River, just wait until you get a smart phone and phones will be interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I don't know if I think it's a good idea for things to move quite so fast Andrew, no sooner do you get the latest something or another and it's superseded by the next best thing..and I refuse point blank to ever own a phone that's 'smarter' than moi :))

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grace, that is a good point but there is never really a right time to bite the bullet, except when you do. Like River, I expect you will end up with a smart phone in the not too distant future.

      Delete