Tuesday, July 30, 2013

NSW Premier O'Farrell in hot water

As I was showering Saturday morning at about 8.30 I noticed the hot water wasn't quite as hot as normal. Our building's hot water system can heat a phenomenal amount of hot water, I remember something like 80,000 litres an hour, but still I also think Saturday morning between 8 and 9 might be peak time for hot water use. I guess you could say our hot water system is gold plated in that we never run out of hot water, which is as it should be. It is designed to cope with the peak usage and sits underused for most of the time.

I recall former Prime Minister Gillard when under pressure about the rapidly rising price of electricity, accusing the private and public power companies of 'gold plating' our electricity system and therefore wasting money.

Believe me, if you live on an upper floor of a highrise building, you want a gold plated electricity system. Australia is a first world country and our power system should be reliable and a failure should be an exceptional event, not a common one and the system should be able to supply power even on the hottest of days with air conditioners working flat out.

I would suggest that our rapidly rising power prices are because our electricity supply and generation has been privatised and investment of capital has to return a profit to its overseas shareholders unlike when our power systems were publically owned and if we paid more than the cost of the power, the money was re-invested is the supply system.

Speaking of privatisation, take a look at the stats for privatised ferries in Sydney, specifically the ferry to Manly that so many of we visitors to Sydney have caught, and that locals depend on as public transport.

Delays up 36% (from 116 to 156)
Cancellations doubled (from 113 to 229)
Cancellations (excluding weather) up 73%
Fares up 39% (from $44 to $61 weekly)

Well done Premier Fatty O'Barrel and Transport Minister Our Gladys. 

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/commuters-cry-foul-as-ferry-fares-rise-while-reliability-falls-20130727-2qr89.html#ixzz2aI4IcCRZ

18 comments:

  1. You're right about the electricity, it never should have been privatised. Gas too. Let's not get started on the phone companies.

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    1. We are in agreement River.

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  2. I hate lukewarm showers!

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    1. Me too Fen. I like to go red.

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  3. Yep, sell it off for quick cash, then blame the plebs when it doesn't work. Nothing new here!!!

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    1. Red, and now we no longer own an income producing asset.

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  4. Maybe we need a plebiscite [sorry Red] on privatisation? Oh, wait a minute, that's what elections are supposed to be for... or is this one of those cases where if it doesn't work in practice, you've got the wrong theory?

    It never occurred to me [as if..] that a highrise would have a single source of hot water. It sounds puzzlingly inefficient. During those "if I won the lottery" fantasies I imagine putting one of those "heats as you use it"* type hot water services just outside each bathroom and the kitchen.
    *[Anyone would have a better idea than me what they are supposed to be called.]

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    1. FC, it seems a bit late now to protest against privatisation, so I will just moan.

      I call them instantaneous hot water systems. It is a lot cheaper for a developer to install one large hot water system than 100+ individual systems. Probably more practical and safe too. I don't like the idea of naked flames in highrise buildings.

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  5. The stats say it all Andrew, you can't argue with the facts!

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    1. Grace, tell that to governments who argue against some very obvious facts.

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  6. FruitCake; they are called instantaneous heaters, I have one for my hot water now, but it is several metres away from the taps, so it takes a while for the hot water to come through. But...if I wanted, I could stay in the shower for a longer time and not run out of hot water.

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    1. River, yes, I thought that was what they are called. Ha, you reminded me of your old hot water system.

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  7. I was completely bemused by the report on the ferries which mentioned the sort of figures you quoted and then at the end quoted Ms Berejiklian citing completely opposite figures of improvement. Except for criticism about the expected fare rises I have heard no community concern about standards of ferry performance falling; then again I don't move in those circles.

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    1. Victor, you know the saying, statistics...through to lies. I assume the same employees are there. I wonder if they working very closely to the rules now.

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  8. I no longer have baths and now my showers are shorter now but I'm just as clean, well almost.
    Merle........

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    1. Elephant stamp for you Merle. I feel cleaner after a shower than when I have a bath. Japanese people at times shower before they have a bath.

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  9. you're right, Japanese people soap up and rinse off, then step into the hot tub for a good soak to relax the muscles and relieve stress. Seems like a great idea to me. I believe they sometimes follow the soak with a massage.

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    1. The luxury of time River. I don't have it.

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