Tuesday, July 02, 2013

Leaving Dublin

We recently spent a good hour or so at the wonderful Immigration Museum looking at the Leaving Dublin exhibition. It was mainly photographic, but there were some videos on large screens. The black bits in the photos is the camera lens cover not fully retracting and I forgot to give it a flick. It clearly warmed up inside and opened properly.


The Immigration Museum is housed in what was the Old Customs House. It is a fine building and although cold outside, it was very evenly warm inside with no obvious heating. Of course there was heating but it was very discreet.


I noted no flash photography, so I turned the flash off. The staircase is grand.


This was marvellous. Essential it is junk for kiddies to hang up on display. The few who were there loved it.


This is looking a bit sad. They are quotes from some of the participants in the videos on display. We watched a couple of videos and they were generally very sad, in fact lump in your throat sad as people explained the hopelessness of their lives in Ireland and why they were emigrating.


The first two photos below are my favourites.  I did chuckle at one caption, along the lines of  '**** left behind unemployment in Dublin and moved to find work in the Shetland Islands'.


The photos were quite brilliantly lit. It is well worth your while to click on them and see them larger.


The graffiti says "Tales from the Promised Land". Once I was home and looking through the brochure, with my glasses on, I noticed again 'no flash photography' but in addition, 'on the first floor'. 'No photography on the second floor.' Oops.


We wandered a bit in the museum, avoiding permanent exhibitions we had seen during our last visit. This was a curious short video focusing on why people on the tram did not say something as an African born youth was being bullied by the chap standing. All he said to the lad was to keep his voice down while talking in his African language. Don't we all wish we could do that at times, never mind what language. It was his staring at the lad, refusing to down next to him, and generally slightly menacing presence. After the bully alighted from the tram, people began saying to themselves, why didn't I say something? It was quite an effective short video showing not overt or abusive racism, but a more subtle form.



12 comments:

  1. I visited this Museum last year and I thought it was excellent. Some of the letters that were on display from people having to leave their homes to travel to the other side of the world looking for work was just so sad.

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    1. Fun60, I don't want to say it is sad as that might put people off visiting, so I will agree that the museum can be quite moving. Leaving family to emigrate must be such a wrench.

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  2. Sounds a bit depressing but the outcome was good for Australia and probably most of those who migrated.

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    1. Diane, for most the outcome was good. Quite a number of English returned home though. Pleased you didn't, not that you had much choice back then.

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  3. Am loving the fans

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  4. The Immigration Museum is my favourite in Melbourne and in other New World countries that have opened similar collections. There is something so poignant about young families leaving their beloved parents and houses, not knowing a word of English and sailing off to the other side of the world. I haven't seen Leaving Dublin, but clearly it was moving.

    Israel (52%) has by far and away the biggest proportion of its population born in other countries, but Australia (26%) is second. We in particular need this museum!

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    1. Hels, I don't know, but would most of Israel immigrants be American?

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  5. It looks most interesting Andrew and I can fully appreciate how it would be so moving. The building is very grand too. I really like how the photos are illuminated.

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    1. Craig, apart from their funny accents, and accent we are well used to here at the moment, they seemed so terribly normal and not motivated by much more than just wanting a life a better than the life they have there. Fortunately they are not Arabic and Moslem, and so are generally welcomed.

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  6. A very nice way to keep warm on a cold winters day Andrew and yes it is well worth enlarging the photos...of photos :)

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    1. Time of the year Grace, to visit 'indoors'.

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