Tuesday, June 04, 2013

Bah to commercial tv

Just once, just for once our commercial television stations could have acted honourably. But no, even though the late musician's, and front person for the band Yothu Yindi, family gave media permission to use his name in reports of his death, they did not give permission for his photograph to be shown. (it has come to light that granting permission to name him may not have been given)

It is Australian Aboriginal custom to not mention a person's name for a certain period after they have died and for their image to be not displayed.

Our ABC may well have screwed up slightly, but I think they tried hard. It is a difficult matter to not name a famous a person who died. But not so the commercial media, especially television. They totally disregarded the custom and went in boots and all. They are a disgrace.

Having said that, the late man was quite an achiever in more than just music and it is sad that he has died at a relatively young age.

I would love to embed Yothu Yindi's hit Treaty here, but it may not be appropriate at the moment. I listened to it loudly in the car yesterday and it is quite a complex piece of music.

9 comments:

  1. Commercial news, education or public affairs is a contradiction in terms. How can an organisation interested in its own profit, to the detriment of every one and every thing else, possibly understand about respect for a family, aboriginal culture, fairness or privacy.

    It was like when Oscar Pistorius' girlfriend was shot dead. The commercial television news services interviewed every man she had ever slept with :(

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    1. Hels, yes, what you say is correct. But I think the ball is other peoples' courts. Aboriginals don't want us to climb on Ayres Rock and I for one would not. But people do. The government needs to examine the strength of feeling and then act. The same goes for the matter I was talking about. How offensive is it? If it is truly offensive, then regulate then make it a media rule.

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    2. I did not know about that matter in South Africa, but it is irrelevant to her murder.

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  2. "It is a difficult matter to not name.."
    Not true.
    All they needed to say was the front musician for the well known band Yothu Yindi has died aged... Then add, in accordance with Australian Aboriginal custom his name will not be spoken, nor his photograph displayed in the media for a period of X months.
    That's not hard surely?
    I like Treaty and have it on my playlist along with Djapana.

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    1. River, after writing the post I realised that it wasn't hard to not name him but still identify him. Your words are wise. I trust you to have the spelling correct. I liked Djapana too.

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  3. River's statement is exactly how it should have been announced. I couldn't possibly write here my opinion of commercial news reporting, lets just say sensation sells and thats the name of the game for them.. I listened to Treaty today also, fantastic..

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    1. Grace, I don't know why I did not listen to Treaty more closely at the time.

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  4. I had never heard of him or his music. So I googled, found out his name and listened on YouTube the kind of music he made. Was quiet an interesting man and far too young to die !
    I didn't know that the Aboriginal custom is not to mention a person's name for a certain period after they have died but apparently the Newspaper and News didn't respect that either.
    I think you dream if you think that a commercial TV station would respect anything ! Business is business ! Sad to say but true !

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    1. Gattina, I wonder if most Australians know about not mentioning the name. Yes, indeed, business is business.

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