Thursday, April 11, 2013

Optic fibre to the end of you street

So close but so far.

Malcolm Turnbull, a shadow minister in our government's opposition party, is a rich man, partly from his creation of Ozemail which he sold for squillions of dollars. One would think he is tech savvy and I am sure he is.

I cannot believe he would argue for a lesser plan for the future of Australia's broadband than optic fibre to the home. Under his plan, fibre will be laid to a neighbourhood node and then go to homes via antiquated copper wires, unless you pay thousands to have it direct to your home. When the copper wires were laid in the early part of the twentieth century, there was no distinction. If you could pay the standard fee, you had a telephone. Fibre to the home is the modern equivalent. While it might be viewed as overkill now, it will be a very short time before it becomes necessity. Mark my words on that, as I have suggested in the past that people who do not have access to the internet will be disadvantaged, and so they now are. What was a toy had now become an essential service.

It is not a vote changer and I doubt anything can save the Labor Party from losing at the next election. What will be interesting is the back downs on impractical promises the Opposition has made when it is elected. I wonder if its broadband plan will be one of them.

Like as public transport should be done, plan it and build it as the budget allows but at least make a start.

16 comments:

  1. I read this in this morning's paper and was so pissed off. Not on my account, since the broadband isn't coming near me anyway, but for all those who were getting it to their street and thought it would be connected all the way to their homes. Who the heck has thousands of dollars laying around just in case they need it?
    Okay, probably some people, but not many that's for sure.

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    1. River, I established it would come to you, I think, but not in a hurry, as is the case for us. If it does not, you will get subsidised satellite, but you are not far out of town and you will get fibre optic, whether to the node or your home.

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  2. I loved this plain-speak explanation of it all, with cat illustrations.
    'Ten years ago the average Australian home had one connected device sitting on a desk in the home office. Now internet connected devices are more than just PCs on desks—they’re our smartphones, our netbooks, our tablets, our TVs, our media players and our camera wearing pets… BLAH! It’s very difficult to step back from it all and appreciate how much internet access has pervaded our lives in that time.'

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    1. I agree Ann. The cat demonstration paints if perfectly. We will need big bandwidth in the future.

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  3. I think it is a stupid idea. It is going backwards. We need the latest and fastest and most modern system that is available. A stupid idea to make it look like they are saving money, rubbish!!

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    1. Diane, a cynic might suggest that the coalition's policy might leave the last bit for private enterprise to make huge profits from. I could not possibly confirm or deny that.

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  4. I like following politics in other countries and I find this quite interesting. I would love to learn and read more about this so I will do that this morning. BTW I tried to add you through your FB link but it doesn't appear to be letting me to it via mobile. I have a FB and Twitter link on my page if you would like and then I can follow you back that way. I need a desktop haha.

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    1. Keith, from what I read things in the US are very mixed as far as service standards go. The good thing about whatever system is built here, the government is building it.

      I might change my details for FB and Twitter to the name I can be found at.

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  5. Thanks for the link, Ann.

    I'm beginning to think that if the coalition actually announce some of their policies there won't be such a landslide at the next election.

    As you say, Andrew, private enterprise might be part of the long term plan... but it seems extremely short-sighted. The pace of technological change is immeasurable, but it seems obvious that with each new generation of technology, file sizes and transmission speed are increasingly important.

    As for Telstra... I would rather have no NBN at all than be dependent on them.

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    1. If they are honest about their policies FC. They haven't been too honest in the past.

      We all hate Telstra but it is the only company big enough to do the job.

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  6. Facebook has been full of old floppy disc photos with the sticker 'Liberal's new MSN plan' on them. Disgraceful...

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    1. Not seen that Kath. Very funny.

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  7. I would normally believe that as unpleasant as conservative parties are, they wouldn't do anything that wasn't in the interests of the Big End of Town. So it makes perfect sense that conservatives would oppose the mining tax and oppose environmental protection ...because the wealthy mining companies hate both.

    But it makes no sense for conservatives to tear up the new optic fibre system. I can imagine all their business and banking mates want it, and want it now.

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    1. Always look for the money trail Hels. Libs want a slice of the pie to make private profit for themselves and their mates.

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  8. The Libs would have us still using dial up, they're so archaic.

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    1. Yes Fen, although I like hearing the dial up sound, I would not want to go back to those speeds.

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