Saturday, December 05, 2020

David Greybeard

This non permanent sculpture is by artist Lisa Roet in association with the wild life conservation organisation the Jane Goodall Institute Global. David Greybeard was named by Dr Goodall when she first began to study gorillas chimpanzees in Tanzania. 

The sculpture is mounted outside the concert hall, Hamer Hall on the banks of the Yarra River. I came up behind it as you can see. It moves a little in the wind. Pretty good isn't it.


22 comments:

  1. It is better than pretty good.
    How long is it there for - and where to next?

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    1. EC, I am not sure. I remember it will travel internationally and maybe it has already.

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  2. Jane Goodall studied chimpanzees, not gorillas. A full-grown chimp is a lot bigger than the juvenile chimps usually featured in comedy movies and TV shows (Lancelot Link comes to mind), and so it's understandable that one might be confused with a gorilla.

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    1. Kirk, I read all about Dr Goodall and chimps and I've known the story for a long time. Why did I type gorillas? I really don't know. Corrected now.

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  3. That is an awesome sculpture, looks very real.

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    1. Margaret, yes, and given it moves a bit.

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  4. The chimp appears to be reaching out for loose change like a beggar but in reality he is simply seeking our help. Are we going to keep walking on by?

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    1. YP, I hope the world doesn't walk on by. They are the closest animals to us. We can't lose them.

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  5. On tv, I saw the animal being blown up and placed on the pillar. I hope school children learn about Dr Goodall, before they see the sculpture.

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    1. Hels, for sure it will stimulate conversation of what it is about.

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  6. The world needs more public art.

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    1. We do Travel. Especially art that stops people.

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  7. I googled this. The outstretched hand represents the initial moment of understanding between Goodall and Graybeard. They were sitting next to each other. Between them was a red palm nut, which is a favorite treat of chimpanzees. She picked it up and handed it to him. He averted his face. She reached it closer to him. He turned to her, looked her square in the eyes, and then reached out and took that nut, gently squeezing her fingers, a gesture of reassurance between chimpanzees.

    It was a lovely moment captured in a sculpture called "The Red Palm Nut"

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    1. Thanks for more background Debby. The moment sounds magical.

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  8. I remember David Graybeard from the articles about Goodall in National Geographic at the time. It was fascinating to read about the chimps and their family trees.

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    1. Steve, I seem to recall it is quite a complex society, as you would expect when they are our closest non human relatives.

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  9. It's a wonderful piece of work, I thought it was carved, then read in another comment it is an inflatable. I guess that makes it easier to transport to different places.

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    1. River, yes and I didn't realise it was inflatable until I saw it move a little.

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  10. I once attended a talk by Goodall; she was wonderful.

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    1. Cro, she is one of the coolest and calmest and most wonderful role model in the world.

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  11. Greybeard is impressive sitting there Andrew.. I love coming in a bit late and reading the comments above, tres informative ✨

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Democracy is all very well, but why give it to the people? - Audrey Forbes-Hamilton.