Tuesday, June 30, 2020

A little history

As I have mentioned Metro Tunnel is a huge Melbourne rail tunnel project under construction at the moment. On the construction hoardings in The (King's) Domain, are a series of interesting panels.

You will need to embiggen these to see properly. This one shows local areas now and also the blue at the bottom is our bay, while the dark line shows a much older line of the bay. The Yarra River is in bright blue.

West Melbourne Swamp went on to become a dock working area and is now a new office, sporting and residential area called Docklands. Although mostly drained by the 1930s depression it was also known as Dudley Flats, at the end of Dudley Street where mostly homeless men set up tents to live.The shape of Albert Park Lake is superimposed on what was South Melbourne Swamp. Batman's Hill was flattened and is the site of Southern Cross Station and what was the Victorian Railways head office. The Pond was known as the Turning Basin where ships once turned around in the 19th century. Yarra Falls was the edge of tidal salt water and river fresh water. It is a very interesting map for me.


While Melbourne did have some horse trams, in the 19th century cable trams were at the fore, like as still remains in San Francisco. Between the the tram tracks is a slot where a grip grabs hold of a moving underground cable and the tram was simply towed along. While motor cars and horses must travel each side of the tramway officers' box near what we now know as St Kilda Junction, cable trams ran on one side of the box.


Early 1920s it was decided to convert Melbourne's tram system to the new electric model. St Kilda Road undergoes conversion.



This photo is interesting. It was taken by an aviator who took many Melbourne photos from the air. At the top you can see the bay, a little below is  the bare looking Gunn Island in the middle of Albert Park Lake. The island is now overgrown and very important to the ecological lake environment.

Government House, where the Governor of the State of Victoria lived and still lives is on the far left. The flag is flying, so the Governor is at home. The Shrine of Remembrance  features upper centre with The Domain and Alexandra Gardens below. Very bottom is Yarra River and the Flinders Street railway yards.


St Kilda Road and Albert Road toward the beach dominate. The Shrine, our major war memorial. BP House is under construction, later to become the posh apartment block Domain, full of rich and famous and politicians. Go a bit further to the south, that is towards the upper part of the photo and there is an eight storey building, the Victorian (horse) Racing Centre, now where our monstrous building is and where we live. 


21 comments:

  1. Interesting history. You got up very early to post this.

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    1. Cynthia, as usual I scheduled this yesterday. I am not that committed that I would get up at 5.

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  2. Fascinating stuff. I belong to some websites on my cities (Cork, Toronto and now St. John's and monitoring progress (ha!) can be edifying.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, there is endless amount online now. We can't possibly keep up.

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  3. I always like to see aerial views of cities. It gives me a whole new perspective (of course) to consider some familiar landmarks.

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    1. EC, that is quite true about aerial photos. It would look so different now.

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  4. The pictures are marvelous! That is quite a metropolis that you live in. A really large city! Thank you for putting these up!

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    1. Maribeth, and that is not even the city area.

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  5. Interesting to get some historic visuals of where you live!

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    1. Thanks Steve. Glad you found them interesting.

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  6. A pleasant step back in time..into the city's history.

    Thank you. :)

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    1. Thanks Lee. Btw, Gympie's gold mining history was featured somewhere recently. It was quite interesting.

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  7. Lovely old photos, although I'm too tired to appreciate them properly. I've been out beach walking and just got home.

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    1. Good on you River. I hope the weather was ok, written with some self interest.

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  8. I never knew trams at one time were pulled from underground cables. I have a hard time envisioning it, actually.

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    1. Kirk, you haven't been on one of San Francisco's cable cars?

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    2. Never been to San Francisco. Hope to one day before I die.

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  9. That is very interesting, the history of those things.
    Never think of why certain ponds and so on were built where they are built.
    Thanks for sharing that.

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    1. Margaret, water would be much closer to us a few thousand years ago.

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  10. Very interesting, Andrew, and very well explained. I find it fascinating to consider all that has happened on the same piece of ground over the centuries. And I enjoy aerial views to get a better idea of where things are in relation to other things.

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    1. Jenny, yes, aerial views do give a good overview. Thanks.

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