Monday, March 23, 2020

Tasmania Day 4

Dog Jack sitting on A's lap is getting old now and slowing down. We looked after him so many times when T lived here in Melbourne. A has just turned 62 and scrubs up well. It was a public holiday, Labour Day, and it was a lazy start. T cooked us an omelette for breakfast.


This gorgeous art deco house across the road is named Rosetta, which coincidentally is the Hobart suburb where we would stay in a week's time. I think for a late art deco house it is perfect, and the garden suits it well.


A side and rear view.


We were also curious about this tree on public land across the road. We once had a crab apple tree and it was beautiful when it flowered in spring. Plant Snap phone app helped me identify this one as a crab apple and it looks like an evergreen.


It doesn't look like birds like the fruit much.


What to do today? T and R were eager to visit the casino. A and I would be bored after five minutes. T and R both had wins, as R did on the ferry machines both ways. A was keen enough to visit the tram museum. It was hard to find and when we did, it was closed. There was a nearby art gallery but we couldn't find the entrance, although we didn't try too hard. I took the car to a car wash and gave it a rough clean and we then headed back to the Seaport for a late lunch at Rupert & Hound. Mudbar had a mix of male and female staff but oddly where we lunched were all female staff. Not good for either me or A to watch but the food and service were fine.

Our late friend who was from Tasmania had the drag name of Jaz or Jazzie, but James' full drag name was Jasmine. A had brought a memento of his, a mermaid figurine. She set it up on the railing and took a photo with this yacht in the background.





Once back home via a visit to restock liquour supplies, I went out for a short walk along the only flat street I could see. This new house is a talking point without large front windows to take advantage of the great views, along with what looks like wallpaper on its front.



The view it could have, minus the car etc.


The closed barbeque was lit and in went a leg of lamb for dinner. R being a very good cook took over the cooking of everything else. We all ate too much and T did not have start work early the next day, so there was time to say goodbye to her in the morning.

35 comments:

  1. It sounds like you had an excellent trip in wonderful company.
    That house is just plain weird.
    The house next to my mother's had no external windows that we could see. There is a park across the road and it always struck me as odd. Shortly before my mother died I had to go next door and discovered that the house was built around an atrium and had plenty of windows away from the public eye.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. EC, we did have a great trip. Yes, it is an odd house. Interesting about the next door to your mother.

      Delete
  2. How strange to have no windows to enjoy the view. Perhaps they didn't want people enjoying the view of watching what went on inside. If that was the case..one-way glass could have solved the problem!

    I've not seen a lot of Tasmania...only Hobart...and the countryside between Hobart and Launceston...but I found it to be quite beautiful. Particularly, the early morning I drove up to Launceston...mist covered many of the fields still, and smoke wafted gently from the chimneys of the various farm houses.

    I will always remember that trip to and fro. I soaked in every bit of it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee, of course, or window tinting. Yes, Tasmania can be very atmospheric with its mists etc. You paint a nice picture.

      Delete
  3. That would be a lovely view for residents of that house, wouldn't it?

    Are those solar panels on its front, I wonder?

    Crabapples are pretty tart, maybe that explains the birds' choosiness.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No Jenny, I don't see solar panels. I'm sure you are right about the crabapples.

      Delete
  4. I agree 100% with you regarding that art deco house ... it sits on the garden block perfectly and has a timeless quality. The house might have been built in 1938, but it looks totally up to date.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hels, the only defect with the house was its modern external night time lighting.

      Delete
  5. You chose two interesting houses to show us. One beautifully designed which sits well within the environment and the other which seems to stick out like a sore thumb.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marie, sore thumb it is for sure. I wonder what the interior of the art deco house is like.

      Delete
  6. I remember Rick Stein being in Tasmania, and enthusing about a Sushi restaurant that was open just two days a week. Does this ring a bell?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cro, no. Probably in Hobart. We don't do sushi and so don't much about it.

      Delete
  7. The art deco house looks rather nice. Those useless crab apple trees are deciduous, there is one across the road and the council planted them several years ago. Those apples fall onto the street and footpaths making it dangerous to walk if not looking, the people across the road often gather them up themselves and put in their bin.
    Forgot to mention we sometimes go to Dynasty for dinner love it and the price is ok. Expect you are used to paying less for meals over your way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret, I agree. A bad choice of tree. You did tell me in an sms that Dynasty is your place to go for your birthday. Yes, we do pay less but both places were quite a bit more classy that where we would eat here.

      Delete
  8. Good for you finding a flat street for some walking. I wonder if the tiny front windows are for weather protection? Against searing summer heat or freezing winter. If someone doesn't care about the view small windows are better.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Making me think River. It faces east, so will get the morning sun like we do and that can certainly heat a place up early but it cools off in the afternoon. I like big windows.

      Delete
  9. Looks a bit likee here ! So I don't need to go to New Zealand, anyway for the moment I am not even allowed to go into the next town unless I invent a dying cousin there ! We start the second week of confinement today !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gattina, Tasmania actually, Australia. We are very restricted but we can still drive and see family and friends.

      Delete
  10. Love the little dog! Adorable! Crab apples taste very bitter. Wild Turkeys will eat them, but not many other birds. Do you have Wild Turkeys in Australia? Gosh, they are everywhere here.
    Tasmania is lovely.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maribeth, he is a great dog. We have what are known as bush turkeys or scrub turkeys but I don't think they are in southern Australia.

      Delete
  11. The crab apple tree looks pretty. That house does look strange.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sami, not bad from a distance but they seem to be an inappropriate street tree.

      Delete
  12. I really adore that art deco home, and I sure could use that omelet right about now.(lol) Hugs, and hope you are well. RO

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RO, are you starving for a Big Mac?

      Delete
  13. Sounds like a fun trip, the apples look good, there is likely something that could be done with them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Travel, maybe ok for jam if combined with a sweet fruit.

      Delete
  14. The wallpaper house would pass as a cathedral in Kazakhstan.


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha Cynthia. I suspect there is some foreign thought in its design.

      Delete
  15. I do love the Art Deco house Andrew, bet it's gorgeous inside as well seeing as they look after the garden so beautifully. The house that's not taking advantage of the view.. wonder what that's all about!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grace, it would be great to see inside the house. The art deco one, of course.

      Delete
  16. Interesting notes about Tasmania. The famous actress Merle Oberon was born in Tasmania. She acted with Sir Lawrence Olivier in Wuthering Heights.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gigi, something I knew but I had forgotten.

      Delete
    2. Errol Flynn too?

      Delete
  17. Sounds like you ate, drank and were merry.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Strayer, we certainly ate more than usual.

      Delete