Sunday, February 09, 2020

I know how old you are

Now don't you be pretending you have no idea what this is. It is a roll of film for a 35mm camera. We found it when cleaning out a drawer as we participate in the Swedish, The Gentle Art of Death Cleaning. It was in an envelope and marked, N's (R niece in England) 21st birthday, March 2003. In 2004 I bought my first digital camera.

Probably a boring story, but I took it to Harvey Norman to be developed at someone's suggestion. No, we don't do that. Maybe that was just the city store. Fine I will have a look on the net. Ah variety store Big W develops films at quite a cheap price. Days later I took the film there. Sorry, Fuji is so slow at processing photos that we have a huge backlog and we are not accepting any new film at the moment.

Ok, I am going to sort this out today regardless and managed 8,000 steps trudging around the city. Across to Elizabeth Street where there is Ted's Camera Store, Michael's Camera Store and another I can't remember, and where I have bought my last two cameras, Digi Direct. A very pleasant salesperson told me it had already been developed and then showed me how he knew. I have never really looked at a roll of film.

You can see the codes here.


And see the punchouts here. Isn't that interesting, although perhaps you all knew it and I did not. Yes, the processing bit has been punched out. Somehow the film is put back and I guess we kept the roll in case anyone wanted copies. Surely it was the last hurrah for rolls of films for you average point and snap photographer. So sad that Kodak missed the digital photography boat setting sail about that year.

38 comments:

  1. I remember those film canisters. And I also remember saving up to have them developed and the disappointment in paying for less than stellar shots to be printed.
    Digital photography is an advance I welcome. So much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. EC, yes it was annoying if photos didn't turn out. We didn't take five photos of the same thing, hoping one would be really good.

      Delete
  2. Now that is interesting - I don't remember seeing those codes nor a developed film rolled back up. When we used 35 mm film the negatives were cut into strips of four pictures each, and included (flat) with our printed photos. I'm thankful for digital photos as I like to experiment with shots and that was too pricey with old film.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jenny, I think I must have misunderstood what the person told me at the camera store. I can only ever remember those strips.

      Delete
  3. I only understand that you have a film roll and nothing on it ! I only started with photography when the digital cameras came out !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gattina, we mostly took photos back then when on holidays and at family events. I remember once R losing a camera in Bangkok with a full roll of photos, and no photos another time on the Great Barrier Reef when the film in the camera did not engage with the sprocket.

      Delete
    2. Oh wasn't that the most awful thing to happen. We have nothing of a visit to Montreal and Toronto back in 1988. 'Somebody' not saying who (except it wasn't me) did put it in correctly! Been back to Toronto many times since but not Montreal

      Delete
    3. Didn't not Did. Bloody preemptive text on iPad is a pain!

      Delete
    4. What a bugger Cathy. It could have just as easily been you as it could have been me with our camera fails. The camera in Bangkok was stolen while R was in a market clothing curtained change area. Shifty hand under the curtain. All hail digital cameras.

      Delete
  4. I did not know that.

    Perhaps the best thing for you to do if you come across a roll that needs to be developed is to phone the stores first, to save you trudging all over the city in search of assistance...just a thought.

    Have a good week, Andrew. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not trudging, exercising :)

      Delete
    2. Lee, I did know the proper camera stores would develop the film but I was trying to save a few dollars. Note, I think I was wrong about the film being in the canister.

      Delete
    3. River, by the end, it was trudging.

      Delete
  5. Like Jenny our 35mm negatives came back flat in the envelope along with the photographs. Never ever had the canister returned. Maybe the lab did just that - returned an empty caniste. Although if there is a piece of the negative protruding I'd be wondering if someone hasn't strung you along a bit. I'd ask mr g if he has any idea
    We've still got a couple of unused ones if you're in the market for some. Our beautiful Pentax gave up on us a few years ago and The Golfer decided not to get it repaired.
    And of course how many of us actually print out 'anything' from our point and shoots??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do and put them on my wall to add some colour to the room.

      Delete
    2. Cathy, I am sure I was wrong now. Why did we have and keep an empty canister in a labelled envelope? I really don't know. Thanks for the offer of redundant technology but no thanks.

      Delete
  6. I remember Fuji and Kodak film back in the day. But, it's the prints I place in photo albums, not the digital.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gigi, it is nice to look through old photo albums, even if the quality wasn't so great.

      Delete
  7. If you are sure it has been developed then you can just prise the end off to get the film out. It's how you get them out in the darkroom to develop them if they've been wound right back in. You should then be able to scan the negatives and see what's on. Careful not to scratch it though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tasker, I am pretty sure now it was empty. I've thrown it out now. I should have opened it up.

      Delete
  8. I've never had the developed film come back to me like this. It was always in flat sections, handy to re-order on the spot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jah Teh, you may be astonished, but I think I was wrong! It is a rare thing.

      Delete
  9. I have never had the developed roll returned to me either, always a flat pack of photos with the flat negatives in strips of five pictures in a smaller pocket on the same photo pack.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River, yes, that's right. We just shredded a heap of those negative last week.

      Delete
  10. Love it !

    We all recognise generations by stuff like that, without having to ask. If someone discusses "braces" instead of "bands", or "cans" instead of "tins", I know they are very young. If someone doesn't remember electric typewriters, they are even younger :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hels, I've never heard braces called bands. Yes, I mostly say tin too. A tin of beetroot but perhaps a can of beer. Today in the Chapel Street Bazaar we spotted a golfball typewriter and a portable manual model too.

      Delete
  11. Didn't know that Andrew.
    Kodak, well they did have good colour always got my slides and rolls done there until the digital came into being..
    Fancy having to go to all those places - hadn't dawned on me that you could get a roll of film developed easily.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret, not hard to do in the city but in the burbs it is quite hard to find a developer.

      Delete
  12. Andrew, I went digital 2 years after you in 2006. But I still keep lots of old negatives. And when I had a set of negatives printed after 15 years, many of the prints had strange coloured streaks and blobs. Very odd, as if they don't keep after a while.

    Gee, your Swedish death cleaning is somewhat premature. Perhaps you are a bit pessimistic about your longevity.
    I always imagined people have that clean-out in their 70's or 80's. But for sure I do hate clutter.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dee, perhaps prematurely retired person finding things to do. The last dvds went into to bin today, either uploaded to cloud storage but mostly destroyed as poor quality. Clips from 2005 weren't so good. We are decluttering but we don't feel there is a rush to do it.

      Delete
  13. That is an advanced photo system canister, the film was returned in the canister. There is a little lever or button the ejects the end of it. There were a dozen of those in my mother’s desk. I was able to feed them through my slide and film scanner and created digital files. Find someone with a slide scanner (a good one is about $100)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Travel. I was feeling really stupid. But the canister indicator said it had been processed.

      Delete
  14. Whenever I developed those rolls of films back in the day I never got them back, just the negatives in an envelope. I wonder why they gave it to you when it had been developed already. Aren't we so much better off with digital now? It was terrible paying for terrible photos! Once in London in the 80's our camera showed something like 30 photos, when we thought we had a roll of 20, and we realized we didn't have a roll in the machine at all!! So the next day we ran around to the main monuments to take photos :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sami, I had forgotten about us doing the same. No film in the camera but the counter kept moving. At least you had the chance to recapture the monuments.

      Delete
  15. Those film canisters! I must have taken one a week with the kids growing up. And the dogs and cats and assorted birds and fish. Wow, interesting how we forget until jolted like now.

    XO
    WWW

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. WWW, when I was young it was quite expensive to have films developed. By the time film cameras started to disappear, it was so cheap, like $7 for two copies.

      Delete
  16. Are you reading or listening to the audio book of Swedish Death Cleaning? Both are awesome. I've also started my way through the Swedish version.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. James, no. I can't keep up with ABC Radio podcasts. I did watch the short video.

      Delete