Sunday, January 12, 2020

Odd Trains

After dropping off the old towels at the Lost Dogs Home in North Melbourne, I walked back to the station arriving just as a train departed. I knew it would be twenty minutes until the next one. I checked my phone and decided to catch the 402 bus to Footscray and then the train and tram home, because I could. I did take some photos in Footscray and had a cup of coffee and I seemed to be a bit of a curiosity among all the black men surrounding me. Oh, what were they thinking about me??? Surely not...... I should be so lucky.

As the well patronised bus bounced over the road level crossing at Kensington Station I spied something that caused me to hop off the bus for to investigate and catch the next bus ten minutes later.

I've not seen these engines in these colours before, although the shape of them is very familiar. I don't know a lot about trains, so research was required. My eyes glazed over as I read the history of Southern Shorthaul Railroad so I won't bore you with that. Odd that they use the American term railroad and not our own term railway, but we have nothing to protect our language nor the imperialisation of our superior metric system.

Briefly though, the engines are diesel electric S Class (diesel engines power generators which then power the electric motors), built for Victorian Railways around 1960 at Clyde Engineering in Granville, New South Wales and mostly used for pulling passenger trains in their early days. Nowadays they are used for freight. In service for sixty years. Impressive and the first was built the year I was born. They have no doubt been overhauled many times. Though badly needed, I haven't been.

One is named Jenny Molloy and I can't find out who she was. The other is Victorian pioneer settler Edward Henty. I believe the yellow and black is the newest livery.





This Wikipedia photo taken by Marcus Wong is as I remember them being, although often quite grubby but always proudly displaying VR for Victorian Railways.

26 comments:

  1. It sounds like you made the very most of your outing. Love that your towels went to the dogs - ours go to the RSPCA and we need to make a trip there soon.
    The coffee amid the black men to watch sounds pretty good and buses you can get off when something strikes your fancy knowing you can get another one quickly sounds amazing to me. Grump, grump, grump.
    The trains look pretty good too. I wonder who Jenny Molloy was (surely named after a woman is unusual?).

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    1. EC, thanks. Most of our bus services aren't ten minute buses, but route 402 is the exception. Yeah, I spent about 15 minutes trying to find out who Jenny Molloy was. Her name rings no bells at all for me.

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    2. NONE of our buses are ten minute services. The peak times, getting people to and from work is a fifteen minute service, but not for all buses, while most of the rest are half an hour and that's if they are running on time. Weekends is a different story with too many buses on an hourly schedule and don't try going anywhere on a public holiday unless you have the whole day free.

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  2. That VR (yellow) engine looks awfully modern way ahead of its time indeed.

    So lovely you can wander like that and yes I feel I desperately need a massive overhaul :)

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, quite a stylish train I think. Wandering around using public transport and taking photos is my favourite thing to do.

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  3. Were you hoping to become an Oreo, Andrew?

    Trains are always fascinating...from the wonderful old steam trains forth...

    Have yourself a good week, Andrew. :)

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    1. Lee; you made me spit my coffee laughing at the Oreo remark.

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  4. I grew up in a railroad family not counting my self. The last three generation had work for railroad. My dad retired off the Union Pacific here, although he gone.
    Maybe sometime I will dig up some old railroad photos and share them on my blog.

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    1. Dora, it would be great to share railroad photos, not just for me but to have them out there for others to see.

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  5. Perhaps the yellow and black is to honour the Richmond footy club which has twice won a Grand Final? (twice that I know of, there could be more)
    I'm astonished and delighted to hear that there are still trains being used for freight. There should be more of them instead of all those extremely heavy road trains ruining the roads which were never meant to carry such weight. In case you are interested, I know why so many American main roads are concrete, it's because they would be carrying heavy military vehicles such as tanks etc, and the person in charge at that time decreed the roads should be built expressly to be able to carry those vehicles without mishap. Way back around WW2 I think. Yet we make do with badly constructed, narrow roads with the barest minimum of bitumen covering, which is cracked and potholed at the first rain.

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    1. River, my paternal grandfather played for Richmond. I should be a natural supporter. I've only recently learnt, thanks to the aforesaid Marcus Wong, that quite a lot of freight in Victoria is moved by rail, but there could always be more. You are so right about roads, including concrete roads.

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  6. VERY odd that they use the American term railroad and not our own term railway, and the world's metric system is VERY superior. Of the 193 countries in the world, three countries stick to Imperial measurements still - the US, Liberia and Myanmar.

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    1. Hels, three countries in the world do stick to Imperial, but in practice, many have a bob each way, such as England and Canada.

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  7. I like those. Our Deltics of the same era only run on heritage services now. There is some similarity in the high split windscreen, although not the headlight. As regards more recent locomotives, they change liveries so often it's hard to keep up.

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    1. Tasker, I am familiar with the Deltics and they can take a very long time to get started in extremely cold weather.

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  8. Classic design and shape, and obviously made to last, and the train is solid too.

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    1. Travel, I can't see modern trains lasting that long.

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  9. Our brand new train will be ready in October. Can't wait to try it.

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    1. Interesting Gigi. I must take a look.

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  10. I'm hopeless with the metric system. Thank goodness for computers that translate the measurements into something I can understand!
    I say railroad, and each engine and cars, is the train.

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    1. Maribeth, of course you do as that is your system and the same goes for railroad.

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  11. The yellow and black looks so smart, a little Art Deco feel, even though it's the wrong time frame.

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    1. Grace, its steam powered S class predecessor was classic art deco.

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  12. I need an overhaul too, Andrew, badly.

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    1. Stayer, I think that goes for all who have commented here.

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