Monday, January 20, 2020

A Carnival and Doctors

Yesterday was gay and lesbian (I will do this once only, GLTBIQ, Gay Lesbian Transgender Bisexual Intersex Queer) Midsumma Carnival Day in Melbourne. We haven't been for a few years for various reasons. Just R and myself went this year together joking that we would meet up with friends once there. Joking.....yes. Of the thousands there, R stumbled across a dyke he worked with many years ago and I ran into my GP who was in his company's medical practice tent. We knew no others. We do know quite a number of gay people in Melbourne, but more gay people don't go to carnival than do.

It was a bit hot but we managed to see most of the stalls but none of the entertainment which would have been later in the afternoon. The dog show hosted by a drag queen and someone famous is a hoot, and we saw plenty of dogs ready for their still Mr De Mille. We left about 1. R can only walk for so long and we were sweating. We did have a disgusting hot dog with cheese from a food van that should have paid us $7 to eat it, not we pay them. Equally bad coffee was found at the skateboard park cafe. Yes, right in the midst of all this gay frivolity with plenty of drag queens, young kids and teens are skating on one one of those metal set ups. We had nice veranda seats at least at the cafe and could watch the passing parade of people.

What really struck me was the ethnic diversity now of gays in Melbourne. Western, Central and Southern American, Eastern European, South Asians, Arabic, but of course Chinese and South East Asians dominate after Westerns, or perhaps they are just the more obvious.

Also it was interesting to see at least six AFL football clubs having presumably sanctioned stalls. The number of tent stalls was huge and mostly not of a direct commercial focus. Our local councils in all directions had stalls, as did Australia Post (grrr) and Our ABC tv/radio. I didn't see phone companies that always used to have a large presence.

To do Midsumma Carnival properly at our age, we need two boys to carry an Esky* with chilled food and drinks, chairs, and an umbrella just in case we want to see something on stage.

After seeing my doctor at Carnival, I wondered how long I have been seeing him.

I made the mistake when I was young of choosing a handsome doctor a decade or more older than myself. Dr Peter Meese died in 2000, probably from AIDS. I have just had a look online and apparently he was quite a high achiever.

https://www.cabrini.com.au/news-and-events/news-archive/new-newsandmediacategory-2/three-nurses-awarded-peter-meese-honour

I have this bloke to check me over for skin cancers. https://portmelbournemedical.com.au/doctors/dr-ian-devlin/ He was once R's GP but he moved from the convenient clinic across the road to a much less convenient location.

But my GP since I think 1999 has been Dr Beng Eu and it was he who I saw at Carnival. You don't see a doctor for twenty years if you don't like him. His job is to look after my health. My job is at each visit to make him laugh, or at least smile.

He is looking a bit grey around the muzzle now but there are the remains of a handsome man.



Oh wow, while online stalking Guggling, I came across this ABC news report of a dead man walking back in 2010, now on Youtube, and Beng was the guy's GP.


*Esky, brand name but used here generically for a large insulated portable food and drink container. Chilly Bin in New Zealand. No idea what it is called elsewhere.

41 comments:

  1. I think in England we call them insulated food carriers, but we rarely need them.

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    1. Tasker, yes, a rare thing for the average English person to own. I think if they were widespread, they would really need a snappier name.

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  2. "Ice chest" at least in this part of US of A.

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    1. Thanks Cynthia. We used to call upright things that you used to put a large block of ice in to keep things cool, ice chests.

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  3. I always forget how many of our 'common' terms are distinctly orstrayan.
    I would say that your doctor is STILL handsome.
    I chuckled at you suggesting you should have been paid to eat that food - something I often find is true of food sold at such events.
    GLTBIQ is quite a mouthful isn't it?

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    1. EC, I'll pass on your compliments to my doctor. Whinge came as a surprise to me, that is not generally known in America. GLTBIQ is not at all difficult. Runs off some tongues very easily. I think even more letters have been added.

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  4. It's natural to start with an older doctor but at some point in your life you have to make the switch to a younger one. I had a really great doctor from some time in the mid-noughties though I always knew he probably wouldn't see me out. One day I did a bit of upside-down reading of something on his desk and saw that he was born in 1938. I asked him why he was still working and he said "I love it." So I knew it couldn't last for ever but I think I found it easier to take advice etc from an older person and he had a great personality, loads of experience and a true vocation. I had a lot on with other people in my family dying and went for about 2 years without seeing him. When I returned I found he had died about a year previously. I haven't really been able to find a replacement yet.

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    1. Marcellous, it is interesting, by your link below, that you never found the need to use a gay doctor. While you may not have got up to as much as I did when I was young, still, I like the mental connection with someone who has a gay lifestyle, no matter how gay friendly a straight doctor may be. Gay doctors know the issues gays face as they face such themselves.

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  5. Corrections: it was 1937 and he must have passed away only a few months after I last saw him. I'm not surprised that I wasn't the only one who thought highly of him: https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/smh-au/obituary.aspx?pid=175563858

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  6. A gay gay outing by the sounds of it. Glad you arrived back home before the storm hit...as you didn't mention the storm...I imagine you did get home before the deluge.

    It sounds like you had a fairly nice day out and about. Have a good week, Andre. :)

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    1. Yes Lee but who are we saying was outed?

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    2. Lee, the storm missed us and carnival entirely but it was very black looking with thunder and lightning to the east. I was also watching it on the radar, hopeful that it would hit here. Sad for those people who were badly affected though. Too much sadness at the moment.

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    3. Ah Lee, you know my secret online name when I pretend to be a cute young Frenchman.

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    4. Haha Marcellous. While it is obvious you are gay to me, it occurred to me that you have never actually said so that I remember, so I may have outed you.

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    5. "Ah Lee"...that sounds like your secret Chinese online name, Andrew! :)

      Good one, Marcellous! :)

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    6. Smile at Lee.

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  7. I go to a public LGBTQ clinic. I don't really have to since I don't have any gay-specific health issues, but it's one way of being part of the LGBTQ community, which is otherwise kind of difficult for me because of the hours I work, where I live, and whatnot. I do have a single primary care doctor going to this clinic, but it changes every years, as people come and go in such a system. I have to admit I tend to treat these doctors as if they were psychologists, which they're not, though I suspect they're used to that when dealing with gay patients, who may not feel free to talk about their lives in a non-LGBTQ setting. It's nice, and I feel like that's a sign of progress.

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    1. Kirk, you hit the mark with the reason you go to such a clinic. And it just makes things a whole lot easier. If you went to a standard clinic, each time your doctor changed, you would have to out yourself again, although I suppose it would be in your files.

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  8. Yes having a great doctor to look after our health is really important.Your description of what's needed for a day out at the carnival made me smile, sounds like us now.

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    1. Cheryl, while would could have sat on the grass, getting R up would be a struggle.

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    2. Just lay him down and roll him home...

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  9. I've found changing clinics doesn't always get you the Dr you were hoping to get. You have been lucky with your choices.
    And I also noticed you didn't mention 'the storm' a summer storm of the sort we used to get years ago. Hot and very humid here out east them wam bang thank you m'am it arrived and then left - after wreeking havoc in the neighbourhood.

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    1. Cathy, Mother whinges endlessly about her doctor but she won't change to another. The storm was terrible, by news reports but missed us entirely. I note it did hit Caulfield.

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  10. Okay, this New England gal calls the "Coolers" I have many as in the summer I want to keep the grocery store purchases cold while we drive home. In the winter, there isn't a worry. Zero degrees Fahrenheit here this morning.
    I love my current PCP. She is amazing and I really feel she is looking out for me.

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    1. Maribeth, we are very cautious now with fresh food, especially meat, but I remember fresh meat sitting for a few hours in a hot car when I was a kid, and nobody died. R is paranoid about getting home quickly after meat is bought.

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  11. I don't think I would know if my two specialist doctors were gay or straight. I only care that they don't have waiting lists that are 6 months long AND that they charge me Medicare costs only.

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    1. Hels, you do well with Medicare costs only. Mates rates? I would pick my GP as gay, but I doubt you would.

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  12. Never heard of term Intersex Queer. But if it wasn't for internet I might be a little more back wards. But in the day there were Libraries

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    1. So what naughty word did young Dora look up in the library?

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  13. Seems you had a fair day then.
    They should have paid you to eat their food - my husband often used to say that.
    Dr's..most of them are nice when you are ill.

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    1. Margaret, when we are at our worst, that is when we want out doctors to be at their best and nicest.

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  14. 20 years, one doctor! I'm impressed and he is quite good looking. I attend a bulk-billing clinic and never see the same doctor twice. They're in an out like revolving doors, always transferring from one clinic to another, or retiring.
    I have to agree with you the best way to attend the festival is with a full esky and a couple of attendants to cater.

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    1. River, R tried going down the road of a bulk billing clinic and it was as you say. He could never see the same doctor twice. He has now found a good female doctor and of course has to pay, as do I.

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  15. The dog show sounded like fun Andrew, have you seen the movie 'Best in Show' it is hilarious you and R would love it 😊 Your doctor looks nice, dependable.. hopefully he is 😊

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    1. Grace, I think we have seen that movie. We lived the movie for a while with my father and stepmother breeding and showing Samoyeds.

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  16. Sounds like a great day for "sightseeing." We really should get out more.

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    1. Travel, there was certainly many sights to get the blood flowing.

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  17. Twenty years with the same doctor says a lot about the doctor. I like mine too. In fact, I dedicated one of my books to him. Sounds like a fun event and fun day.

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    1. Sandra, that is a nice thing to do and I hope he treats you kindly for years to come.

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  18. We have the Gay pride each year in Brussels and people come from whole Europe it's quite an event and a big parade I found a link from last year !

    https://www.pride.be/program18may2019/

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    1. Thanks Gattina. Great fun and I like the way Pride Marches in Europe and the UK are rotated around.

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