Thursday, December 05, 2019

Tree solved

Cathy was on the money, River supported her and Lee thought so too, a silky oak it is. My app Plant Snap thought it was a Bristlecone Pine, I think. I can't see that it saves the names of what is snapped. It was wrong, regardless. I was getting my she oaks and silky oaks mixed up too.



As I walked through the park, the leaves of this tree were rustling loudly and I only remember such a rustle come from a poplar, but it it is not a poplar I know.


This is likely to be the one I do know.


And a gratuitous photo of three beautiful (fingers crossed) golden elms.

21 comments:

  1. Thank you. How the name escaped me so thoroughly I know not. They are struggling (because of the drought) to bloom here, but are beautiful things.

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    1. EC, not old age fog as R's sister describes it? I like them in bloom but I think a bit ordinary when not.

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    2. Quite possibly old age fog.

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  2. My grandmother kept a lifetime list of all of the birds and trees she had seen, I wonder what happened to those lists?

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    1. Travel, if anything like here, many of the birds and trees listed would not be around now.

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  3. Many of our Elm trees were killed off due to Dutch Elm disease passed along by a Beetle. We had many beautiful ones on our Apple Farm in the 70's One by one, they died off and had to be cut down. Quite sad. They've been planting a new disease resistant Elm around New England, but they are all fairly young.

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    1. Maribeth, it is so sad and has affected elm trees across the world. Luckily while we have the beetle, we don't have the disease.....yet.

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  4. I wish I knew trees better. I do love them. I see such character in their trunks and the way they grow.

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    1. Strayer, sometimes the bark can just be amazing, and our gum trees can have wonderful bark.

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  5. There is amazing new information about trees and how they communicate, sustain and warn each other. There is so very much we don't know about plant life. I remember reading about mushrooms and being absolutely gobsmacked.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, yes they are far more than just a inanimate object.

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  6. I thought it might be that tree but couldn't remember what it was called. Another valuable piece of information would have been when the photos were taken. In Sydney I think the big flowering time is past by now - probably it is later in Melbourne. This is interesting: https://www.climatewatch.org.au/species/plants/silky-oak

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    1. Marcellous, almost every year I think to myself, that tree seems to be flowering early this year but of course I don't make a note so I don't really know. But I think light is more responsible for tree flowering, rather than warmth.

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  7. Oh I knew what it was Andrew, just didn't want to spoil the fun.... And if you believe that you'll believe anything 😉

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  8. Ah...so there we are...problem solved! :)

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  9. I replied to your palm query, too, Andrew. But don't quote me...re what palms they are...just a stab in the dark! :)

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    1. Lee, another poor attempt at humour by me.

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    2. I'm confused, Andrew...I don't know what you mean. I thought you asked a genuine question re what type of palm it was. My fault, not yours! :)

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    3. I have replied too now Lee and I think you are correct. I was being silly and as someone tells me, I am not as funny as I think.

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  10. P s the palms look very much like the date palms here, but ours have thicker trunks, so still a date palm but a different variety.

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