Friday, December 06, 2019

Countryside?

The quiet peacefulness of a country railway line cutting, and yes, I have used this photo before.


What is this coming? It isn't a train. It is light rail vehicle, or tram. We don't have those in the country.



Nor do we have highrise buildings in the country like the one visible through the trees to the left. It is the old inner suburban St Kilda railway line converted for tram use in the 1980s, along with the Port Melbourne train line. Both now so busy, even with these route 96 trams around 60 metres long running every few minutes in the peak and the conversion turned out to be a  poor decision.


The apartment tower closer up. It's called Park Towers in Park Street, South Melbourne and is state government owned public housing with rent adjusted to income. We have a number of these around Melbourne and they are often but not always places of social unrest and trouble. Park Street is one of the better ones I think. They are often the first home for new immigrants and refugees from areas of conflict. Some are three bedroom and quite spacious and some are well looked after.

24 comments:

  1. I am always wondering how people feel living so close to so many. The largest apartment complex I lived in had 36 units per building. Mostly I did not know anyone else in the building. Sort of sad, really.
    I imagine one day I will live in a condo complex, but I hope to be in a detached or semi-detached home then.

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    1. Maribeth, there are 128 apartments in our building, mostly three bedroom, so that is a lot of people but it works fine, but then there are not the social problems here that would be in the government housing. You do have a better sense of community in a smaller place though.

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  2. It does look like a peaceful and lovely place. Our public housing areas are also often fraught with problems. The current government is trying to push them out into the suburbs which is causing fear and anger, both from the public housing tenants and their potential neighbours.

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    1. EC, is that gentrification or developer profits, or perhaps both.

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  3. It's good that the trams are able to go on railway tracks. It would give more flexibility for their use.

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    1. Cheryl, the tracks did have to be altered and they have been fully relaid since. I think our trains are broad gauge and our trams standard gauge.

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  4. Often that type of social housing can be very depressing, and almost encourages the residents to become 'anti-social'. To me, it looks like a nightmare, but I imagine to a fleeing refugee it probably is heaven (for a while).

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    1. Cro, I would not want to live in such a large block. All over the world such housing for the poor and immigrants has been found unsatisfactory, including on the outskirts of Paris and Brussels. Many have been demolished in the UK.

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  5. It looks fun to ride on.

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    1. They are Dora, not as smooth as a train, but much smoother than a bus.

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  6. Love the pics of the tram making it's way along there Andrew, not so much Park Towers, but then again if you are fleeing from a dreadful situation, a roof over your head would be the best place in the world ✨

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    1. Grace, many people have lived there for decades. R knows some, especially an old Russian couple.

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  7. Imagine a quiet older person like me being put right in the middle of Park Towers with noise and trouble all around. I'd be a quivering mess of nerves in no time at all. Candidate for a straight jacket I'd be. it's bad enough here now that the rougher elements are getting housed, with one very close breaking a door down to get in, getting the door fixed, then accidentally locking him/herself out and breaking the door to get in.....

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    1. River, while such places can be difficult, I am not sure that they are so bad as you go about your business. Once inside with your door locked, you are on your own with nothing to bother you.

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  8. Gee, can only imagine the housing of the public in that building, but better than them living on the street and being homeless. When we've stayed in decent hotels with two to 3 floors it's not always quite and nice, of course some places are. One can here footsteps, water running and all kinds of things, not my cup of tea to live in - so wonder if you can hear the same in your nice building?

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    1. Margaret, we hear little from anywhere in the building. I think I can at times hear the shower of the woman next door running when I am in my bathroom. Not sure. At the max we would have no more than five metres of common wall with anyone. Our walls are thick. Thicker than the places you are talking about I think. We have the constant white noise of traffic and trams, but we don't really hear either.

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  9. We call this kind of high buildings rapid hutches or habitation machines. We have them here too in Brussels for social cases but not so high, maybe 10 floors and also along the railway !

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    1. Gattina, I think some of yours in Brussels have been very troublesome.

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  10. I live in a building with 250 apartments, one of four buildings in the community. We are about 80% owner occupied. I love it here. The challenges are not the building, the challenges are behaviours. When there are challenges in people's lives we need to offer more than housing, we need to offer options to help people develop and live well.

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    1. Travel, I guess you are not talking about where you live. Having secure housing is a start to helping people with whatever challenges them.

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    2. It was early, a lot of the “failures “ in public housing, or income based housing are a lack of supports beyond four walls.

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    3. We probably do better here with external support but of course it could always be better.

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  11. High rise public housing was popular in the USA for a while, but were eventually decried as "ghettos in the sky", but of course it's the poverty and not the actual building that's the cause of the social problems.

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    1. Kirk, as been discovered all over the world.

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