Tuesday, December 03, 2019

Bits

I am sure I have been guilty of the misuse of apostrophe's and I don't mind if you correct me when I do. Mostly it will be a typo but at times I have to think carefully, especially with plural possessive, such as we have the Princess' Theatre. Someone once tried to tell the theatre that the apostrophe was wrong but research turned up that it was named after two princesses.

This is sad news but still the argument about few or fewer items at the English supermarket checkouts goes on.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/apostrophe-society-shuts-down-because-ignorance-has-won-a4301391.html

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Little Jo at 12 and half has entered her sullen teenage years, although after asking Sister on the way to yesterday's birthday if I would have an Advent Calendar for her, she was so pleased when I gave her the paper bag containing the calendar. I used to buy them from Germany and they were beautiful but the postage was costing more than the calendar.

Sister pushes her to be communicative, Little Jo, speak more loudly for Nanny (Mother), push your hair away from your face. Speak clearly. Tell the uncles what you did Friday night. She performed in a band. I connected with her a bit in that she sang a Billy Idol song. It was like extracting teeth and I thought Sister should just lay off her and let her be in her sullen teenage years.

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A benefit of using public transport is hearing snippets of conversations. I find the most interesting conversations to eavesdrop on are private school boys, because they speak so well and they talk about interesting things. Private school girls are the opposite, horrible nonsense, shrieking, and overly loud talk. I hate it when a large group of them are on my tram.

The other interesting people to overhear is older women chatting together, as was the case today. 'It needed some sweetening. Maybe some jam or strawberries'. I think they were talking about stewed rhubarb but I am not sure. Stewed rhubarb was mentioned, 'great on your breakfast cereal, but not too much'. 'My brother finds marmalade too sweet so he puts it in a pot on the stove and mixes in some bitter oranges then puts it back in jars'.

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I like how older women speak to strangers on public transport. I used to hate it. 'Hey, don't you realise I have earphones in and don't want to talk?' Now I am happy to talk to anyone. Today on the route 30 tram along Latrobe Street, I noted a tourist looking couple, the man taking photos with his serious camera of what I think is the oldest house Central Business District. I moved seats and plonked opposite them and asked them if they knew about the house. I didn't realise until after I spoke to them their English was not great, but they understood a little about the history of the house as I told them. I felt sorry for them as they left the tram at the Docklands terminus and faced a cold and biting wind. I felt sorry for myself, so after taking a couple of photos, I was back on a tram with nowhere to go in mind. I left the tram at So Cross Station and et some tucker and thought I will catch the first VLocity country train leaving to somewhere. I ended up at a rather uninteresting place called Deer Park and I was back at So Cross Station within an hour. As soon as I left the train at Deer Park I realised it was not a place for me to linger and a return train was due in two minutes. I correctly predicted what would happen. I touched off my public transport card and tried to touch on again to return, but the display said, you have already touched off. Once back at So Cross Station I couldn't go through the gates as they indicated I had not touched on for the trip. I went to the gate with staff in attendance and I was let through without showing anything.

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At yesterday's lunch, I was talking to Sister across R, who was also nagging me to help Mother who was on the other side of me with her meal, like arrange it so it would be easy for her to eat, while Mother was nagging in my other ear about her son, Tradie Brother's meal getting cold while he was outside smoking. Fed up with her carry on, I called TB to tell him his meal was served. I am of fairly even temperament, but truly, had R had said anything later about not helping my mother with her food, I would have punched him on the nose.

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While R was volunteer driving the oldies (as he calls them when many of them are younger than him) around yesterday, he came across a woman's purse dropped on the street. He took it to the local police station and he and the boy copper (R's words) jointly counted out the 15 dollars in the purse, full of credit and other cards. R filled in a brief form and the boy copper asked him if the purse had not been collected within the required time because the person's identity could not be discovered, would he like the item, including the $15. Perhaps it is a question that has to be asked, but given the purse was full of cards with ID, it was a pointless question by the boy copper.

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As bushranger Ned Kelly said before being hanged to death, Such is Life. As the once dreamingly gorgeous footballer Ben Cousins tattoo says, Such is Life.


A better photo of Ben in less drug fucked years.


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More, what is the style of writing on a body called? A font? What a hot font you have, badboy Ben.

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You think I am done yet? No. A few days ago from the balcony ago I counted 19 cranes within sight. They were all all angled. Tonight in the cold stillness they are all standing vertically. Off duty, they angle against the wind. No wind, no angle.

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Not finished yet. Ex Sis in Law, Oldest Niece and her two daughters and son were coming to visit today. They would park here and we would all catch the tram to town and see the (boring) Myer Christmas window display, then see the decorations at Crown Casino and have lunch. It was on, and then off, then on and then off, and then on and now off. 

C'est la vie. I amused myself. 

30 comments:

  1. Lots of this post hit home.
    While I like the cold, I did NOT like being sleeted on as I headed for the bus yesterday. It was a lazy wind and went through me definitely not round me.
    I eavesdrop on conversations on the bus all the time, and am often fascinated/horrified by the things people share in public.
    I was very, very lucky yesterday. Going through a crowded and noisy bus interchange the seam to the pocket on my granny trolley gave way. The first I knew of it was when a stranger tapped me on the shoulder and handed me my wallet. I am so very grateful - and glad that I don't have to go through the extreme pain of replacing all of my cards (not to mention losing the money).

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    1. EC, sleet in December is truly amazing. I find most people are pretty honest, as was that person.

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  2. I've never seen anything gorgeous about Ben Cousins. He doesn't do it for me; never has. He's still a waste of space.

    I talk to anyone. It's kind of a friendly, happy space up here on the plateau...and people willingly share a word or two and smiles. I was chatting with a couple of men a few weeks ago, and one said he was visiting from the city, and wasn't used to the friendliness being shown between the locals, known or unknown to each other.

    I don't recall ever going through "sullen teen years". Our Nana and Mum wouldn't have allowed us to behave that way. They wouldn't have stood for it. My brother and I weren't perfect, but "sullen" was not allowed. We were told to speak up; answer with clarity when spoken to, and look others straight in the eye...when we were little kids through to our teen years.

    I do not like tattoos...I never have. I don't understand the mindset of wanting tattoos. There is nothing attractive about them...to my eye, and in my opinion. And why would someone want artwork all over their back and the back of their legs etc., when it can't be seen unless standing in front of a mirror peering over their shoulder. It doesn't make any sense to me.

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    1. Lee, I doubt we would have been allowed to be sullen either. Times have changed. I don't like huge tattoos that cover large parts of bodies. I've never thought about the back of leg tattoos. Yes, they wouldn't really see them.

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  3. We were in WA last year and a very loud group of Asian (Chinese) youths played cards on the ferry all the way to Rottnest Island from Perth. They seemed unaware that they were on public transport. Usually I like chatting to fellow travellers and overhearing other people chatting doesn't bother me but omg the noise they made including screaming when they won. Maybe I'm just a grumpy old woman.

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    1. Cheryl, yes, we come across people like that. Honestly, playing cards on the wonderful trip to Rottnest Island? Mad.

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  4. Lee, sister!

    I talk to everyone as well. Apparently I am taking over from my late mum's sociable custom :)

    And while tattoos on the bum are private, those in public space are.. public. Keep them hidden and reveal them only for the most intimate friends.

    Andrew
    Two princesses in the possessive would be princesses'.

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    1. Hels, re tattoos, a tease is better.
      I think princess' is a legitimate and less cumbersome way to write it.

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  5. Agree with Hels on the grammar, I'm passionate about grammar. I talk to everyone have had the most interesting and sad and happy and intense conversations with people of all ages. last one was the checkout clerk on Friday night and we got so engrossed talking about Korea she put her "closed" barrier up and we carried on. She was 19. I am 76. Amazing young woman.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, I have a mental image of a queue of furious customers behind you while you were chatting, but I guess it was quiet. It is good when old and young connect.

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  6. Never catch the bus so don't hear people talking, maybe I'm missing out of something.
    Sullen years, oh yes, we have one teenager who comes every second weekend to stay and she is so sullen it's unbelievable, not a word, it's even hard to say hello for her, so sad. Then her sister will follow or has started too - heaven forbid.
    Well you certainly got a lot of your chest, and it seems not much patience at the meal that day...never mind Andrew, you will come through it.

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    1. Margaret, and it is not restricted to girls. Boys can just grunt and say nothing.

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  7. I agree Andrew - it's interesting eaves-dropping on conversations - especially if it's about food / recipes. sometimes have to stop myself from leaning over and saying
    "now what was that again"

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    1. Dianne, perhaps you are close to the age where you don't care and should do just that, lean over and ask.

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  8. I can't stand grunting 13 year olds. State schools no longer have drama departments or debating societies, and children are rarely corrected when it comes to anything to do with speech. Private schools tend to place far more importance on such things. Many children are simply being let down by the system.

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    1. Cro, similar here. Australia is very low on the literacy scale if measured against the world, as I just read this morning. The crowded curriculum is always blamed, but nothing is done about it.

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  9. Your mother can't arrange her own food?
    I agree with sister that Little Jo needs to speak up and speak clearly and be polite, sullen teenage years be damned. She's out in the company of family, all older than her and deserving of respectful treatment. Let her be sullen at home and hide away in her room if that's what she wants.
    Apostrophes is plural and needs no apostrophe.

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    1. River, is she shut up and concentrated on her meal, yes she could. It was a schnitzel sitting on top of chips and a separate small bowl on the plate with salad and then another smaller bowl with a dressing. Maybe sullen is unfair. She is a quiet child generally.

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  10. You should do more of these posts Andrew, they are informative, entertaining and an amusing insight into family life.. you do have a lovely, if somewhat annoying..to you not we, family 💜

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    1. Grace, no, too many comments to reply to, haha.

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  11. What a fun post. Loved the bits. I feel like I'm all caught up on what's been going on in your life. And yes I used an apostrophe:)

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    1. Sandra, it is quite pointless me ever emailing anyone who reads this to tell them what I have been doing. Thanks.

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  12. Another one here who enjoyed this post Andrew. We see the other side of you by your recollections of events and how they affected you.
    When The Golfer used to pull our 'sullen teens' up I often said, ignore them, leave them alone, they'll get out of it soon enough. Often youngsters don't know what they want, they are often self conscious and lacking confidence- hence the displays of what we think of as bad manners.

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    1. Cathy, I agree with your thoughts on teens. It is easy to forget what it was like. Thanks.

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  13. I think you may be right about sullen teenage Jo. Leave her alone. I like listening in to conversations too.

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    1. Diane, yes, I agree. I am sure where you are you hear plenty of snippets of conversations.

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  14. These stories are terrific, just everyday life, your life. Poor sullen Little Jo, I think, she has years of the sullen outlook and depressed rebellion, and oh my, pity those near, touched by the teenage hormonal outbursts.

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    1. Strayer, she starts secondary school next year and maybe that will help.

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  15. As a very sullen teenager I understand. My mother would say she'd rather tell people I wasn't home when she had company!
    We are at the stage now with J's grandkids and I just say leave them alone.

    Listening to other people's conversations is the best pastime.

    I agree, I love these newsy posts from you.

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    1. Jackie, I think you right and good that you have a personal memory.

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